Google Los Angeles

Located in the Frank Gehry-designed Binoculars Building just two blocks from the beach, Google Los Angeles offers some of the most fascinating engineering and sales work in the world. We’re helping the second largest city in the United States become a veritable tech center.

Accomplishments

We’re leading the way in machine learning, and our engineers have made contributions across Ads, Google+, Chrome, YouTube and Search.

L.A. Googlers have won National Sudoku Championships and Academy Awards, worked as rocket scientists and inventors, climbed mountains and played in Swedish metal bands (and that’s just for starters).

We’re large enough to do a lot and make Google-wide impact, but small enough that we can still build great relationships and collaborate amongst teams.

Stats

Number of Los Angeles Googlers: Fewer than Nikola Tesla's birth year divided by three

Some of our conference rooms are named: Blade Runner, Griffith Park, Frank Lloyd Wright

Number of minutes it takes to Venice Beach, on foot: 5

Address

Google Los Angeles
340 Main Street
Venice, CA 90291
Phone: (310) 310-6000

Inside Google Los Angeles

Who needs Silicon Valley when you can have Silicon Beach? Whether churning out high impact products or working on barrier-busting ad campaigns, Google L.A. is a central player in Los Angeles’ growing tech community.

At Google L.A., our engineers have worked on many forward-thinking technology projects, from our advertising platforms to Chrome, from YouTube to Google+. And our sales teams get to work with everything from entertainment to automotive clients, pushing the limits of what digital advertising can do. We’re introducing brand new ad formats that help L.A. businesses grow and connect with their customers.

We’re located two blocks from Venice Beach, in the Binoculars Building, a space designed by Frank Gehry. The binoculars, which house two of the coolest conference rooms in the building, were designed by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen. We have a climbing wall, an outdoor movie theater, a rooftop deck with views of Venice Beach and a Michael Mina-trained chef.

Prefer the sand and surf over a mountain view? Want 300 days of sun a year? Forget the Valley – pack your bags for Google L.A.

There’s a natural sense of buoyancy here. The people are bright, upbeat and professional. The space makes visitors ‘ooh’ and ‘ahh.’ And the beach is a block and a half away.

- Tommy McGloin, Head of Industry, Media & Entertainment

Google Los Angeles: Frequently Asked Questions

What makes Google L.A. unique?

It starts with our location in Venice, long home to the edgy and offbeat, from Beat poets in the 1950s and the Z-Boys skateboarders of the 1970s to Jim Morrison, George Carlin and Jean-Michel Basquiat. It continues with our offices in the Frank Gehry-designed Binoculars Building, for which we commissioned an amazing mural by local artist Mungo Thomson. All that creativity is inspiring, helping us push the needle on innovation in technology development as well as in helping clients develop exciting new approaches to engaging customers. We also enjoy 300 days of sunshine a year and our two-block commute to Venice Beach. ;)

What kind of development work comes out of Google L.A.?

We’re home to hundreds of engineers who’ve contributed to products and projects including Advertising, Google+, Mobile Photos, Chrome, YouTube, Search Quality, Video Ads, Multimedia Search, computer vision, cloud infrastructure, site reliability and core infrastructure.

Have any L.A. Googlers done any cool stuff outside of Google?

We’re proud to have Tammy McLeod, the 2009 National Sudoku Champion, as part of our team. When software engineer Evan Stade isn’t churning out code, he’s a pretty solid cyclist: he was part of a team that raced an airplane – and won. And our senior engineering director and site director Thomas Williams has won a couple of Oscars – the Scientific and Engineering Award and the Technical Achievement Award in 1996, for software he developed while at Industrial Light & Magic.

Do you do anything to make getting to work easier for L.A. Googlers?

We have free parking, but offer credits to encourage our Googlers to use more environmentally friendly means of getting to work. We also provide WiFi-enabled shuttle service, offering Googlers living as far away as Pasadena a better way to commute. Fully a third of our Googlers don’t drive to work. Not many employers in Los Angeles can say the same.

What does fun, Google L.A.-style, look like?

When we’re not watching a movie screening in the courtyard, or enjoying a Thursday TGIAF (Thank Goodness It’s Almost Friday) on the rooftop deck, you might find us on offsites to Catalina Island or tossing tennis balls to four-legged friends at our on-site dog park. We’ve got surf boards for Googlers that want to hit the beach and an outdoor climbing wall for those that prefer mountains to waves. We also showcase local artists’ works, which Googlers can (and do) purchase, in our espresso bar. And all kinds of fascinating celebrities swing by to check out our space. So far our visitors have included Penn Jillette, Stan Lee, Molly Ringwald and (fittingly, given our proximity to Muscle Beach) Jesse Ventura.

How does Google L.A. build ties with Venice and the broader Los Angeles community?

This is hugely important to us. We have an annual week-long program focused on a variety of causes, from Habitat for Humanity to Heal the Bay. In education, we’ve helped the Environmental Charter School build a science lab and the Westminster School District build a computer lab, and donated Chromebooks to The Partnership for Los Angeles Schools and laptops to 826 Valencia. Our Googlers’ generosity shines during our holiday toy drive. We support Homeboy Industries, a charity devoted to rehabilitating gang members. We go to a Girl Scouts event called Girltopia to talk about opportunities for girls in science and engineering.

Life at Google Los Angeles

Google to open campus in Los Angeles

Google to open campus in Los Angeles

We arrived at the Binoculars Building toward the end of 2011, and the L.A. Times ...

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