McClure's Magazine, Volume 26 (Google eBook)

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S.S. McClure Company, 1906
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Page 385 - Cast me not off in the time of old age; forsake me not when my strength faileth.
Page 224 - God, give us men! A time like this demands Strong minds, great hearts, true faith and ready hands; Men whom the lust of office does not kill; Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy; Men who possess opinions and a will; Men who have honor; men who will not lie; Men who can stand before a demagogue And damn his treacherous flatteries without winking! Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog In public duty and in private thinking...
Page 315 - With rue my heart is laden For golden friends I had, For many a rose-lipt maiden And many a lightfoot lad. By brooks too broad for leaping The lightfoot boys are laid; The rose-lipt girls are sleeping In fields where roses fade.
Page 250 - No spirit feels waste, Not a muscle is stopped in its playing nor sinew unbraced. Oh, the wild joys of living ! the leaping from rock up to rock, The strong rending of boughs from the fir-tree, the cool silver shock Of the plunge in a pool's living water, the hunt of the bear, And the sultriness showing the lion is couched in his lair.
Page 562 - White in the moon the long road lies, The moon stands blank above; White in the moon the long road lies That leads me from my love. Still hangs the hedge without a gust, Still, still the shadows stay: My feet upon the moonlit dust Pursue the ceaseless way. The world is round, so travellers tell, And straight though reach the track, Trudge on, trudge on, 'twill all be well, The way will guide one back. But ere the circle homeward hies Far, far must it remove: White in the moon the long road lies That...
Page 224 - ... whom the lust of office does not kill; Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy; Men who possess opinions and a will; Men who have Honor; men who will not lie; Men who can stand before a demagogue And Damn his treacherous flatteries without winking! Tall men, sun-crowned, who live above the fog in public duty and in private thinking; For while the rabble, with their thumb-worn creeds, Their large professions and their little deeds, Mingle in selfish strife, Lo! freedom weeps, Wrong rules the...
Page 387 - Thy way is in the sea, and thy path in the great waters, and thy footsteps are not known.
Page 250 - How good is man's life, the mere living! how fit to employ All the heart and the soul and the senses forever in joy!
Page 396 - Why, as men do a-land ; the great ones eat up the little ones. I can compare our rich misers to nothing so fitly as to a whale ; 'a plays and tumbles, driving the poor fry before him, and at last devours them all at a mouthful. Such whales have I heard on o' the land, who never leave gaping, till they've swallowed the whole parish, church, steeple, bells and all.
Page 324 - Take away from him the pound, and give it unto him that hath the ten pounds. And they said unto him, Lord, he hath ten pounds. I say unto you, that unto every one that hath shall be given ; but from him that hath not, even that which he hath shall be taken away from him.

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