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Books Books 1 - 10 of 153 on True, I talk of dreams ; Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing....  
" True, I talk of dreams ; Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air, And more inconstant than the wind... "
Titus Andronicus. Romeo and Juliet - Page 146
by William Shakespeare, Henry Norman Hudson - 1880
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The Works of Mr. William Shakespear: In Eight Volumes. Adorn'd ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1709
...good Carriage: This is (he- »— J Rom. Peace, peace, Mtfcutio, peace; Thou talk'ft of nothing. Mer. True, I talk of Dreams; Which are the Children of an idle Brain, Begot of nothing, but vain PJiantafie, Which is as thin of fubfhnce as the Air, And more unconftme tlun the Wind; who wooes Even...
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The Works of Shakespeare in Seven Volumes, Volume 7

William Shakespeare, Mr. Theobald (Lewis) - 1733
...almojl lojl the ufe of bis Legs. Rom. Peace, pea :e, Mercutio, peace } • Thou talk'ft of nothing. Mer. True, I talk of dreams •, Which are the children of an idle brain, '• Begot of nothing, but vain phantafie ; Which is as thin of fubftance as the air, And more unconftant than the wind ; who wooes...
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The Works of Shakespear: In Six Volumes, Volume 6

William Shakespeare, Alexander Pope, Sir Thomas Hanmer, Nicholas Rowe - 1745
...carriage : 5 "This, this is fhe .x Rom. Peace, peace, Mercutlo^ peace ; Thou talk'ft of nothing. Mer. True, I talk of dreams ; Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing, but vain phantafie, Which is as thin of fubftance as the air, And more unconftant than the wind, who wooes Ev'n...
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The beauties of Shakespear: regularly selected from each play, with ...

William Shakespeare - 1752
...of good carriage : This is me Rom. Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace «, Thou talk'ft of nothing, Mer. True, I talk of dreams ,Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing, but vain phantafy, Which is as thin of fubftance as the air»i And more unconftant than the wind ; who woces...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare in Eight Volumes: With the ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson - Drama - 1765
...of good carriage. This is flie— Rom. Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace ; Thou talk'ft of nothing. Mer. True, I talk of dreams, Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing, but vain phantafy, Which is as thin of fubftance as the air, And more unconftant than the wind ; who wooes Ev'n...
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The plays of william shakespeare.

William Shakespeare - 1765
...thin of fubftance as the air, And more unconftant than the wind 5 who wooes Ev'n now the frozen bofom of the north, And, being anger'd, puffs away from thence, Turning his face to the dew-dropping fouth. Ben. This wind, you talk of, blows us from ourfelves; Supper is done, and we fhall Come too...
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The Works of Shakespeare: in Eight Volumes, Volume 8

William Shakespeare, Mr. Theobald (Lewis) - 1767
...thin of fubllance as the air, And more unconfrant than the wind ; who wooes Ev'n now the frozen bofom of the north, And, being anger'd, puffs away from thence, Turning his face to the dew-dropping fouth. Ben. This wind, you talk of, blows us from ourfelves ; Supper is done, and we (hall come too...
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The Works of Shakespear: Troilus and Cressida. Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare, Alexander Pope - 1768
...thin of fubftance as the air, And moreunconftant than the wind ; who woos Ev'n now the frozen bofom of the north, And, being anger'd, puffs away from thence, Turning his face to the dew-dropping fouth. Rom. I fear, too early ; for my mind mifgives, Some confequence, yet hanging in the Stars, Shall...
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The Lady's magazine: or, Entertaining companion for the fair sex

...—True ! I talk of dreami, Which arc the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain phantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air, And more inconstant than the wind — i Who wooes Even now the frozen bosom of the north, And, being anger'd, puffs away from thence,...
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The works of Shakespear [ed. by H. Blair], in which the beauties observed by ...

William Shakespeare - 1771
...thin of fubftance as the air, And more unconftant than the wind ; who wooes Ev'n row the froien bofom of the north, And being anger'd, puffs away from thence, Turning his face to the dew-dropping fouth. Ben. 1'his wind you talk of, blows us from oui felves ; Supper is done, and we fhall come too...
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