The Family Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes; in which Nothing is Added to the Original Text; But Those Words and Expressions are Omitted which Cannot with Propriety be Read Aloud in a Family, Volume 9 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1818
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 327 - The weight of this sad time we must obey ; Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most : we, that are young, Shall never see so much, nor live so long.
Page 271 - Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these ? O, I have ta'en Too little care of this ! Take physic, pomp ; Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel, That thou mayst shake the superflux to them, And show the heavens more just.
Page 309 - Lear Be your tears wet? Yes, faith. I pray, weep not: If you have poison for me, I will drink it. I know you do not love me/ for your sisters Have, as I do remember, done me wrong: YOU have some cause, they have not. Cordelia No cause, no cause.
Page 221 - Thou, Nature, art my goddess ; to thy law My services are bound. Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom, and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, For that I am some twelve or fourteen moonshines Lag of a brother ? Why bastard...
Page 235 - Lear. — Does any here know me ? — This is not Lear : does Lear walk thus? speak thus? Where are his eyes? Either his notion weakens, or his discernings are lethargied. — Sleeping or waking? — Ha! sure 'tis not so. — Who is it that can tell me who I am ? — Fool.
Page 55 - tis slander, Whose edge is sharper than the sword ; whose tongue Outvenoms all the worms of Nile ; whose breath Rides on the posting winds, and doth belie All corners of the world : kings, queens, and states, Maids, matrons, nay, the secrets of the grave This viperous slander enters.
Page 221 - Thou, nature, art my goddess ; to thy law My services are bound : Wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custom ; and permit The curiosity of nations to deprive me, For that I am some twelve or fourteen moon-shines Lag of a brother? Why bastard?
Page 241 - Lear. O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven ! Keep me in temper : I would not be mad ! — Enter Gentleman.
Page 82 - Fear no more the frown o' the great: Thou art past the tyrant's stroke. Care no more to clothe and eat; To thee the reed is as the oak: The sceptre, learning, physic, must All follow this, and come to dust.
Page 214 - The mysteries of Hecate, and the night ; By all the operations of the orbs, From whom we do exist, and cease to be ; Here I disclaim all my paternal care, Propinquity, and property of blood, And as a stranger to my heart and me Hold thee, from this, for ever.

References from web pages

sciencedirect - The Lancet : Thomas Bowdler: censor ...
Quick Search: within. All Full-text Sources. Quick Search searches abstracts, titles, keywords, and authors. Click here for more ...
linkinghub.elsevier.com/ retrieve/ pii/ S0140673601061876

Lynch, "What's in a Name?"
And so in 1807 there appeared a four-volume set of Shakespeare's plays called The Family Shakspeare: In Which Nothing Is Added to the Original Text, ...
andromeda.rutgers.edu/ ~jlynch/ Papers/ acting.html

Bibliographic information