New Facts Regarding the Life of Shakespeare: In a Letter to Thomas Amyot, Esq., F.R.S., Treasurer of the Society of Antiquaries, from J. Payne Collier, F.S.A. (Google eBook)

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Thomas Rodd, 1835 - Dramatists, English - 55 pages
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Page 5 - Steevens, the most acute, and perhaps the most learned, of his commentators, stated, long before, that " all that is known with any degree of certainty concerning Shakspeare is — that he was born at Stratford upon Avon— married and had children there-— went to London, where he commenced actor, and wrote poems and plays — returned to Stratford, made his will, died, and was buried.
Page 34 - London, for, if one man were dead, they will have much need of such as thou art. There would be none, in my opinion, fitter than thyself to play his parts : my conceit is such of thee, that I durst all the money in my purse on thy head, to play Hamlet with him for a wager.
Page 5 - ALL that is known with any degree of certainty concerning Shakespeare, is — that he was born at Stratfordupon-Avon — married and had children there — went to London, where he commenced actor, and wrote poems and plays — returned to Stratford, made his will, died, and was buried.
Page 33 - James alsoe, since his coming to the crowne, hath extended his royal favour to the companie in divers waies, and at sundrie tymes. This other hath to name William Shakespeare, and they are both of one countie, and indeede allmost of one towne : both are right famous in their qualityes, though it longeth not to your Lo.
Page 30 - ... promise ; and, when thou feelest thy purse well lined, buy thee some place of lordship in the country; that, growing weary of playing, thy money may there bring thee to dignity and reputation : then thou needest care for no man ; no, not for them that before made thee proud with speaking their words on the stage.
Page 17 - when, however, they saw that the whole court had left town, they persisted in acting it ; nay, they brought upon the stage the Queen of France and Mile, de Verneuil. The former having first accosted the latter with very hard words, gave her a box on the ear. At my suit three of them were arrested ; but the principal person, the author, escaped.
Page 52 - Amongst all the great workes of your worthynes it will not be the least that you have donnefor me in the preferment of my brother, with whome yet now sometimes I may eat whilst I write, and so go on with the worke I have in hand, which God knowes had long since bene ended, and your Honor had had that which in my harte I have prepared for you, could I have but sustayned my self and made truce within, and peace with the world. But such hath...
Page 44 - It hath little or no furniture for a playhouse, saving an old tottered curten, some decayed benches, and a few worne out properties and peeces of Arras for hangings to the stage and tire house. The raine hath made its way in and if it bee not repaired, it must soone be plucked downe, or it will fall.
Page 33 - Lordships kinde helpe, for that he is a man famous as our English Roscius, one who fitteth the action to the word and the word to the action most admirably.
Page 23 - This, you will own at once, is a very singular, as well as a very valuable document, considering how scanty has hitherto been all our information regarding the pecuniary circumstances of our great Poet.

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