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Search Education

Lesson Plan Map

Lesson 1: How can appropriate search terms and queries guide targeted searches?

Level Essential Understanding Unit Guiding Question Lesson Guiding Question Knowledge Skills
Beginner Using the right search terms to develop a query facilitates collection of sources so researchers can target their searches for a specific task. How can appropriate search terms and queries guide targeted searches?
  • How can I figure out the right search terms to develop a query?
  • How are my search terms interpreted to gather information for me?
  • Search terms
  • Query
  • Methods to assist with developing queries: (1) parsing, (2) web, (3) word list
  • Determine key search terms
  • Create query for task
  • Connect how search tools work to what results come up
  • Use academic and domain specific words and phrases
Intermediate
  • What unique terms can I use that will help me search effectively?
  • What are context terms?
  • How can context terms help me target my search for what I need?
  • Unique terms
  • Context terms
  • Classify terms as unique or common
  • Generate context terms
  • Identify domain appropriate context terms
Advanced
  • What is the difference between firm and soft search terms?
  • Why I do need to utilize the deep web? How do I find deep web resources?
  • How can context terms help me target my search for what I need?
  • Firm and soft search terms
  • Deep web vs. visible
  • Context terms
  • Special subject collections
  • Create query
  • Determine appropriate context terms
  • Discern between deep and visible web
  • Search the deep web
  • Discover special subject collections

Standards
Common Core (CC) Standards: CCR W 1, CCR W 2, CRR W 7, CRR W 8, CRR L 6, CRR R 4, RI.3.5
AASL: 1.1.2, 1.1.4, 1.1.8
ISTE NETS•S: 3.a, 3.b, 6.a

Lesson 2: How and why do researchers evaluate search results?

Level Essential Understanding Unit Guiding Question Lesson Guiding Question Knowledge Skills
Beginner Keenly evaluating search results and thinking creatively lead researchers to make wise decisions in selecting appropriate strategies and sources that ultimately satisfy the task. How and why do researchers evaluate search results?
  • What appears on my search screen?
  • Are there problems with the results, or are they on target with my task?
  • What do I need to know to help me choose the right links?
  • Full screen shot elements: search bar, ads, natural results, filters
  • Individual search results: title, web address, snippet, bolded words, ellipses
  • Homepage
  • Researchers carefully look at their results to make educated decisions about where to click.
  • Locate parts on a search screen
  • Identify main parts on individual search result
  • Read and decode web addresses
  • Anticipate expected results
Intermediate
  • What can search results tell me about the quality of my question?
  • What are some strategies effective searchers use to find what they need?
  • Researchers carefully look at their results to make educated decisions about the questions they are asking.
  • Strategies: Pre-search or plan-to-learn, alternate phrasing, chaining, comparing sources
  • Skim full results page
  • Assess research need to identify appropriate strategy
Advanced
  • What are some strategies effective searchers use to find what they need?
  • Strategies: Pre-search or plan-to-learn, alternate phrasing, chaining, specialization, generalization, comparing sources
  • Assess research need to identify appropriate strategy

Standards
Common Core (CC) Standards: CCR W 1, CCR W 2, CRR W 7, CRR W 8, CRR L 6, RI.3.5
AASL: 1.1.2, 1.1.3, 1.1.4, 1.1.5, 1.1.8, 1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.4.1, 2.2.1, 2.2.3, 3.3.3, 3.3.5, 4.4.3
ISTE NETS•S: 3.a, 3.b, 3.c, 4.c, 6.a

Lesson 3: How can I narrow my search to get the best results?

Level Essential Understanding Unit Guiding Question Lesson Guiding Question Knowledge Skills
Beginner Applying the appropriate strategies to narrow a search yields more targeted and effective results that support searchers in their task. How can I narrow my search to get the best results?
  • What is the best type of source to use to collect evidence I need?
  • What filtering strategies help me find accessible sources from the Web?
  • What are operators and how can I use them to narrow my search?
  • Filters: sites with images, related searches, dictionary, reading level
  • Images search: any size, any color, any type, etc.
  • Common factors
  • Operators: OR, quotation marks, minus sign
  • Apply filtering strategies according to research task
  • Employ operators to achieve targeted results
  • Identify problems with search results and utilize strategies to correct them
Intermediate
  • What filtering strategies help me find accessible sources from the Web?
  • How can I use operators to narrow my search?
  • Filters: time filtering, translated foreign pages, verbatim
  • Operators: OR, quotation marks, site:, minus sign, tilde (~)
Advanced
  • How do I use operators to fix a search gone wrong?
  • Advanced search
  • Identify problems with search results and utilize strategies to correct them

Standards
Common Core (CC) Standards: CCR W 1, CCR W 2, CRR L 4, RI.3.5, RI.5.7 , W.9-10.8, W.11-12.8
AASL: 1.1.8, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.4.1, 2.2.1, 2.3.2
ISTE NETS•S: 3.b, 6.a, 6.c

Lesson 4: How and why do researchers evaluate search results?

Level Essential Understanding Unit Guiding Question Lesson Guiding Question Knowledge Skills
Beginner
  • Keenly evaluating search results and thinking creatively lead researchers to make wise decisions in selecting appropriate links that ultimately satisfy the task.
  • Search results can direct researchers in new and complementary directions that can enhance the original search.
  • The purpose of the task dictates the kind of research one conducts, the technology tool used, and the evidence that is collected and ultimately used.
How can I search for the best evidence to satisfy my task?
  • What new words have I learned through my search?
  • How do I use my search results to help me find new and more information?
  • What is evidence?
  • How do I find the most appropriate sources and gather evidence for my task?
  • Vocabulary development
  • Evidence: facts, statistics, data, anecdotes, examples, definitions, quotes
  • Stepping stones; iterative search
  • Left panel (multi-media sources): images, videos, maps, book
  • Sources: letter, journal, article, images, maps, videos, graphs, etc.
  • Define unknown words
  • Learn and use new terms from search results
  • Define and identify types of evidence
  • Cite examples of evidence
  • Search for new information
  • Stay on topic
  • Evaluate research
  • Select better search terms
  • Revise query
  • Conduct new searches
  • Select best source tool for task
Intermediate
  • What are different formats of web pages?
  • What evidence do I need to support my task?
  • What web pages are best to access evidence I need?
  • Formats of web pages (sources): blog, wiki, Q&A sites, discussion lists, scholarly works, search engines, news/article sites, databases/archives, reference sources, documents, informational pages
  • Define and identify types of formats
  • Determine which formats to use to collect evidence
  • Compare and contrast different types of formats and the evidence they contain
Advanced
  • What is Google scholar? How can it help me satisfy my search need?
  • What is scoping? What piece of the web am I zeroing in on that will help me satisfy my search need? Where’s my answer going to likely exist? (What’s the forest that’s going to help me find my tree?)
  • Google scholar
  • Scoping (forest and trees analogy)
  • Other Google tools (e.g., google fusion tables, public data finder, google maps, google art project, etc.)
  • Stepping stones
  • When to stop searching
  • Recognize when a search is complete; determine when to stop searching

Standards
Common Core (CC) Standards: CCR.R.4, CCR.R.7, CCR.W.1, CCR.W.2, CRR.W.7, CRR.W.8, CCR.W.9, CRR.L.6
AASL: 1.1.2, 1.1.4, 1.1.6, 1.1.8, 1.2.2., 1.2.3, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.3.4, 1.4.1, 1.4.3, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.5, 2.1.6, 2.2.1, 2.2.3, 2.4.3, 3.1.2, 3.1.4, 4.1.4, 4.1.7, 4.2.1, 4.2.2, 4.3.2
ISTE NETS•S: 1.a, 1.c, 1.d, 3.a, 3.b, 3.c, 3.d, 4.c, 4.d, 5.b, 6.a, 6.b

Lesson 5: How do I evaluate and decide which credible sources to use for a specific task?

Level Essential Understanding Unit Guiding Question Lesson Guiding Question Knowledge Skills
Beginner

INFORMATIONAL PROJECT: Evaluating and choosing credible sources enables writers to gather relevant information about a topic to convey ideas accurately and clearly.

ARGUMENT WRITING: Evaluating and choosing credible sources enables writers to identify effective reasons and supporting evidence to effectively persuade readers.

How do I evaluate the credibility of sources and determine which ones to use for a specific task?
  • 5A: What do I need to consider about the sources that I use?
  • 5B: How do I decide which sources to use for an assignment?
  • What is evidence?
  • 5C: How might the tone or style of the writing impact its credibility?
  • Sources
  • If it’s too good to be true, it probably is.
  • Don’t believe everything you read.
  • Authorship: Who wrote the information? When was it written? Can it be verified?
  • Tone and style
  • Audience and purpose
  • Validate sources
  • Examine authorship
  • Determine credibility of sources
Intermediate
Advanced
  • How can I recognize bias?
  • Why might I use biased information?
  • What are indicators of misquotes or falsified images?
  • How might I check the facts of a source?
  • Authorship: point of view, position, production source (author, organization, company)
  • Bias; degree of bias; reason for bias
  • Internet sites: which to use to verify accuracy and which to avoid
  • Recognize bias
  • Identify what triggers skepticism among source credibility
  • Verify sources
  • Check facts

Standards
Common Core (CC) Standards: CCR W 1, CCR W 2, CRR W 8, RI.3.5, RI.5.7, W.6.1b, W.7.1b, W.8.1b
AASL: 1.1.2, 1.1.4, 1.1.5, 1.1.7, 1.2.4, 1.2.6, 1.2.7, 2.1.1, 2.2.3, 2.3.3., 2.4.1, 4.1.5, 4.2.3, 4.3.2, 4.4.6
ISTE NETS•S: 3.b, 3.c