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Publication numberUS1000172 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 8, 1911
Filing dateAug 20, 1910
Priority dateAug 20, 1910
Publication numberUS 1000172 A, US 1000172A, US-A-1000172, US1000172 A, US1000172A
InventorsJohn S Hopkins
Original AssigneeLewis G Andrews, John S Hopkins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat-insulated receptacle.
US 1000172 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. S. HOPKINS.

HEAT INSULATED REGEPTAOLE.

APPLICATION FILED AUG. 20, 1910.

Patented Aug. 8, 1911.

Ira/anions Ji 6J6.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JOHN S. HOPKINS, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK ASSIGNOR OF TWO-FIFTHS TO LEWIS G.

ANDREWS, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

HEAT-INSULATED RECEPTACLE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Aug. 8, 1911.

Application filed August 2 0,1910. Serial No. 578,241.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JOHN S. HoPnrNs, a citizen of the United States, residing at- Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State .5 of New York, have invented certain new temperature for practically an indefinite period.

It has for its objects among others to provide an improved receptacle which shall be simple, yet possessing great durability and tion and thus protect the jointures between the inner and outer vessels; Thejreceptacles are preferably constructed entirely of metal,

thus being exceedingly durable and possess- 5 ing great stability, rendering them, in a sense, practically indestructible.

I aim also at improvements in the cap which enhances the durability and desirability of the receptacle, said cap being placed over the completed vessel and the outer and inner edges crimped inwardly to fit tightly to the retainer.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will hereinafter appear and the 5 novel features thereof will be particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

The invention is clearly illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which, with the numerals of reference marked thereon, form a part of this specification, and in which- Figure 1 is a substantially central vertical section through the receptacle. Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the receptacle with an outer jacket and an outer cap or cup. Fig. 5 3 is a similar view through the oval receptacle with the cap and bottom plug removed. Fig. 4 is a section similar to Fi 2 of the receptacle shown in Fig. 3 provi ed with an outer jacket and the outer cap or cup in position. Fig. 5 is a horizontal section on the line. 55 of Fig. 2. Fig. 6 is a horizontal section on the line 66 0 Fig. 7 is an enlarged detail of the turned seam at the junction of the bottom of the 5 outer vessel. Fig. 8 is an enlarged detail of which will prevent excesslve vertical vibra-v Fig. 4.-

the non-heat conducting pad showing the recess therein for the reception of the inner vessel.

Like numerals of reference indicate like parts throughout the several views.

The receptacles may be manufactured in the form of refrigerators, flasks, pots, bottles, iceboxes, pans, siphons, tanks, coolers, refrigeratingcars, grips, satchels, carryingcases and any and all other forms or shapes orsizes, according to the purpose for which said receptacles may be desired or by or through which it is desired to retain liquids or other substances or space at a desired temperature for an indefinite period of time.

In the present instance I have shown receptacles of substantially cylindrical and oval form, merely as examples of some ways in which the invention may be utilized. The cylindrical receptacles I preferably construct of plain or smooth surfaced sheet metals, while flator oval receptacles, are preferably constructed in part of corrugated sheet metals in the form of a double walled vessel embodying a vacuum.

In the course of construction of the receptacles, the metals are, by preference, coated with an a ate or enameling solution, to make the. meta impervious, although it is evident that the essentials of the invention are not affected by the rendering of the materials impervious.

Referringto the drawings, in carrying out the invention, the preferable mode of procedure is as follows. Referring first to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, I take an inner vessel 1 of sheet metal, copper, brass, zinc or other pliable metallic material, made substantially cylindrical in form and somewhat restricted at the neck, as seen at 2, 3 being the neck. The outer vessel 4 is cylindrical in form, conforming in its general shape to that of the inner vessel 1, restricted at the neck, as at 5, '6 being the neck. These two vessels are suitably joined or united at the top, as seen at 7 by seaming, brazing, soldering, welding or otherwise, the outer vessel being constructed of sheet metal, such as copper, brass, zinc or the like.

8 is the bottom of the inner vessel secured thereto in any suitable manner, as by suitto which the sides or Walls of said outer vessel are secured in any suitable manner, as for instance by a turned seam, as seen at 1.2 in Fig. 1, and in the enlarged detail Fig. 7. Between these two bottoms 8 and 11 is placed a suitable heat non-conducting substance 13 which also serves to assist in arresting the. vertical vibration.

'Between the inner and outer Vessels is a space 14: and between the inner and outer bottoms is a smaller space 15, from which spaces the air is designed to be expelled, so as to create a vacuum. This may be accomplished in any suitable manner. In the present instance, I have shown the outer bottom 11 as provided with a suitable aperture 16 which is internally threaded, as at 1?, for the reception of a suitable plug 18 which, when secured in place, forms an airtight seal. This plug is shown as tapered but, of course, this is not essential. The plug is provided with a slot19 in its outer end for the reception of a screw driver or other implement by which it may be removed or screwed tightly into place.

20 is a wire secured to the bottom of the inner vessel and preferably retained in the seam or jointure of the walls or sides and bottom thereof. This wire is seen best in Fig. 5. It is designed to rest in notches or seats 2i in the stays 29 which are supported on the supplemental bottom 10, being preferablyformed integral with said bottom by being stamped or cut therefrom and turned up at right angles so as to form the said stays or supports. The wire 20 rests within these notches in these stays, as seen in Figs. 1 to 6.

23 is the cap for use on the vessels or re ceptacles without the outer covering or jacket. it. extends over the jointure between the inner and outer vessels at the top and is internally threaded, as seen at 24-, to receive the serew-threaded stopper or plug :25, 20 being a gaslni-t of any suitable material, such as pressed paper, india rubber, cork or any other pliable material placed around the upper end of the plug or stopper 25 beneath the peripheral edge 27 thereof, to prevent leakage at the mouth or neck of the bottle or retainer. This cap is provided with the depending skirt or flange 28 between which and the neck of the outer vessel there is a space 29 designed to be filled with a plastic composition suitable for binding the cap to the top and around the neck of the structure.

30-is an indentation which may extend. entirely around the neck of the outer vessel or for a portion only of the same, which is designed to be filled with a suitable plas is com 'iositiou, so as to secure the skirt of the cap to the neck oi the outer vessel and this aids also in strengthening the structure. At

31. the lower edge of the skirt is turned or crimped in toward the neck of the outer vessel, so as to tit tightly thereto.

The oval or flat vessels or receptacles are substantially identical with those just described eXcept as to shape, as will be clearly understood upon reference to Figs. 8, 4: and G.

The vessels hereinbefore described may sometimes be provided with an outer cover ing or jacket, shown at 32, constructed to conform to the general shape of the vessels being, of course, of greater dimensions and constructed of any desirable suitable material. Between this outer jacket and the outer vessel 4 is a space 33 which is designed to be tilled with suitable plastic or nonconducting material or composition, so as to bind the outer jacket and the outer vessel 4: together. the outer jacket or covering of a suitable non-metallic material, in which instance this space 33 may be-omitted, or it may be pres cut and the non-conductive material 34 omitted.

tcferring to Fig. 2, there will be seen a tri-eipiidistant indentation 35 at the neck of the outer jacket or covering 32 for the purpose of holding in place when adjusted the outer cap or cup 36. This indentation is disposed below the indentation in the neck of the outer vessel 1-, as seen in Fig. 2, and the outer cup or cap serves to strengthen and reinforce the structure at this point. This cap serves also as a protection or guard for the inner stopper, and when removed may be used as a drinking cup. The top edge or" the said cup or cap, that is what constitutes the top edge when usedas a drinking vessel, is preferably beaded, as shown at 37, by means of a wire in the usual manner. 38 a flange extending inward at the upper end o1 the outer covering or jacket 32, which when fittedin place rests snugly on the bonding joint or jointure of the two vessels 1 and 4; at the upper end of the neck.

in some instances I may employ in lieu of the screw-threaded cap or plug 25, an ordinary stopper 39, as seen in Figs. 2 and t.

From the above, it will be seen that l have devised a simple and etlicient durable receptacle capable of manufacture at nominal cost and which in use will be found serviceable, possessing stability and not liable to breakage or injury in use or transportation; and while the structural embodiment of the invention as hereinbefore disclosed is what i at the present time consider preferable, it is obvious that the same is subject to changes, modifications and variations in the details, shape, proportion of parts etc. ll, therefore, do not intend to re strict myse f to the particular cmistruction herein disclosed, but reserve the right to make such changes, variations and modiii I sometimes propose to make cations as come properly within the scope of the protection prayed.

What is claimed as new is I 1. A heat insulated receptacle comprising inner and outer vessels, a supplemental bottom on the bottom of the outer vessel, stays integral with the supplemental bottom and rising therefrom, the stays having notches in which the bottom of the inner vessel is received, and a wire retained in the joint at the bottom of the inner vessel and engaged in said notches.

2. A heat insulated receptacle comprising inner and outer vessels, a supplemental bottom on the bottom of the outer vessel, stays integral with the supplemental bottom for supporting the inner vessel, a cap secured to the neck of the outer vessel with an interposed plastic composition and engaging the top edge of the inner vessel, and a stopper for the inner vessel.

3. A heat insulated receptacle comprising inner and outer vessels, a supplemental bottom on the bottom of the outer vessel, stays integral with the supplemental bottom for supporting the inner vessel, the neck of the outer vessel having a circumferential indentation, a cap extending below said indentation and secured to the' neck" of the outer vessel with an interposed plastic composition, and a stopper forthe inner vessel, t

4. A heat insulated receptacle comprising inner and outer vessels, a supplemental bottom on the bottom of the outer vessel, stays integral with the supplemental bottom for supporting the inner vessel, the neck of the outer v'essel having a circumferential indentation, 'a cap extending below said indentation and secured to the neck of the outer vessel with an interposed plastic composition, the cap having an inner downwardly extending flange, and a stopper fitting into said flange for closing the inner vessel.

5. A heat insulated receptacle comprising inner and outer vessels, a supplemental bottom on the bottom of the outer vessel,

vessel, a jacket inclosing the outer vessel and having a circumferential groove in its neck, and a drinking cup provided with a bead adapted to fit into said groove, whereby the cup is removably attached to the neck of the jacket.

6. A heat insulated receptacle comprising inner 'and outer vessels, a supplemental bottom below the bottom of the inner vessel, a non-conducting material interposed between the supplemental bottom and the bottom of the outer vessel, stays integral with the supplemental bottom and rising therefrom, the stays having notches in which the bottom of inner vessel is received, a wire retained in the joint at the bottom of the inner vessel and engaged in said notches, the neck of the outer vessel having a circumferential indentation, a cap extending below said indentation and secured to the neck of the outer vessel with an interposed plastic composition, the cap having an inner downwardly extending flange, a stopper fitting into said flange for closing the inner vessel, a jacket inclosing the outer vessel and having a circumferential groove in its neck, and a drinking cup provided with abead adapted to fit into said grooveywhereby the cup is removably attached to the neck of the jacket,

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

JOHN S. HOPKINS.- [L. 5.]

Witnesses:

WILLIAM W. J EBB, MARIE B. HOPKINS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2481664 *Mar 19, 1945Sep 13, 1949Hemp Joseph LInsulated container
US3015403 *Apr 8, 1959Jan 2, 1962American Thermos Products CompThreaded stopper expanding pouring lip combination for vacuum bottle
US3017047 *Apr 8, 1959Jan 16, 1962American Thermos Products CompCombination vacuum bottle and closure means therefor
US3110408 *Sep 20, 1960Nov 12, 1963Aladdin Ind IncEconomy vacuum bottle with plastic jacket
US3837330 *Mar 28, 1973Sep 24, 1974American Hospital Supply CorpHeat-retaining server
US4653469 *Aug 7, 1985Mar 31, 1987Nippon Sanso Kabushiki KaishaVacuum-heat-insulated cooking utensil and method of manufacturing same
US4865014 *Feb 16, 1989Sep 12, 1989Nelson Thomas EWater heater and method of fabricating same
US4974551 *Aug 3, 1989Dec 4, 1990Nelson Thomas EWater heater and method of fabricating same
WO1990009546A1 *Jan 16, 1990Aug 23, 1990Thomas E NelsonWater heater and method of fabricating same
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/592.26, 220/215, 220/592.27
Cooperative ClassificationF25D23/062