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Publication numberUS1002910 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 12, 1911
Filing dateJan 21, 1911
Priority dateJan 21, 1911
Publication numberUS 1002910 A, US 1002910A, US-A-1002910, US1002910 A, US1002910A
InventorsWarren M Foote
Original AssigneeFoote Mineral Co, Albert E Foote, Warren M Foote
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display-mount.
US 1002910 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. M. FOOTE.

DISPLAY MOUNT.

APPLICATION FILED JAN. 21, 1911.

Patented Sept. 12, 1911.

UNITED srATns PATENT OFFICE. I

.WABREN M. FOOTE, OF LANSDOWNE, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGN OR TO WARREN M.

FOOTE, TRUSTEE UNDER THE WILL F ALBERT E. FOOTE, TRADING AS FOOTE MINERAL COMPANY.

- DISPLAY-MOUN T.

Patented Sept. 12, 1911.

Application flled' -Tanuary 21,v 1911. Serial No. 608,840.

. To all whom it may concerns Be it known-that I, WARREN Foo'rn, a citizen of the United States, residing at Lansdowne, in the county of Delaware and State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Display Mounts, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to a device for mounting specimens and objects of interest for the purpose of exhibition, and in such connection it has particular relation to a device for mounting entomological, botanical mineralogical and other natural history specimens and the like. Two main types of mounts are at presentin common use for the display of natural history specimens, one of which consists of a glass cover plate under'which is secured, in any suit-able manner, a rigid tablet of plaster orother material having formed therein depressions for the reception of all Or a portion of the object to be exhibited. This form of mount while of considerable usefulness in some respects is objectionable principally on account of its lack of adaptability to variations in the size and shape of the specimens or objects to be mounted. The other form of mount "re ferred to consists of a similar glass cover plate under which is carried a bed of cotton batting or similar yieldable material in which the specimen or object will embed itself. This form of mount while also having a considerable field of usefulness on account of its adaptability to various shapes and sizes of objects has been found in practice to be unsuitable for mounting the heavier objects such as minerals,'n1etals and the like.

The principal object therefore of my invention is toprovide a device for mounting specimens which will overcome the obj ections to the other forms of mounts referred to, which will be adaptable to various shapes and sizes of specimens and objects to be exhibited, and which will be particularly valuable for the mounting of heavier specimens such as minerals, metals, etc., as aforesaid.

The nature and characteristic features of my invention will be more readily understood from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming part hereof, in which Figure 1 is a perspective vlew of a display mount embodying the main features of my present invention, the various parts being shown 1n detach-ed relationship; Fig. 2 is a transverse section of the device shown in Flg. 1, the parts being assembled and a specimen being shown in place therein; and Fig. 3 1s a view similar to Fig 2, but of a modified form of my invention.

Referring to the drawings, in the particular embodiment of my invention there shown, 4 is a transparent cover plate, preferably glass, which is surrounded by a cardboard frame 5, making in effect a boxlid 6. The preferred manner of constructing the boxlid 6 consists in surrounding the edges of the glass 4 with a stri of cardboard 7 havinga portion 17 exten ing over the top of the glass 4, and a strip of thicker cardboard 8 is lnclosed within the outerstrip 7 and supports the glass cover 'plate' l from beneath. The cardboard frame of the lid 6 may be covered by a suitable finishing paper 9.

10 is a pliable sheet, of any suitable material such as cloth, canton flannel, velvet, or even paper, which is adapted to maintain the object to-be exhibited against the under surface ofthe glass 4 as will hereinafter be morefully set forth.

11 is a box tray of any preferred construction; as shown consisting of the tray portion proper 12, the outside dimensions, the vertical walls l3,"of which are slightly less than the inside dimensions of the lid 6. The tray 11 may be provided with a flange 14;, formed by securing a larger piece of cardboard 15 to the underside of the tray portion proper 12, and the structure may be suitably covered by a finishing paper 16.

In mounting the specimen 19 to be exhibited inthe device the same is placed on the pliable sheet 10 which is held more'or less taut over the tray 11. In the preferred form of the invention as shown the sheet 10 is somewhat larger than the subjacent tray 11 so that the lid 6 will encounter a projecting portion of the pliable sheet 10 sides as Well asthc top of the specimen will be exposed to view and that the conformation assumed by the sheet 10 will greatly enhance the appearance of the specimen to be exhibited. The sloping of the sheet to the edges of the cover plate will also serve to reflect the light around the sides of the specimen. Furthermore the portion of the sheet which is held between the lid 6 and the vertical walls 13 of the tray 11 will efi'ectually prevent dust, etc., from reaching the specimen, as well as acting as a frictional means for preventing undesired separation of the parts while permitting ready access to the specimen when desired. It will also be seen that the specimen will be held quite firmly against the glass so that specimens mounted in the device may be readily shipped without danger of damage or shifting about. In some cases it may be found desirable to place a wadding of cotton batting or similar yieldable material 18 in the tray 11 beneath the sheet 10 as clearly shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings.

Having thus described the nature and characteristic features of my invention, What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a device for exhibiting specimens, a transparent cover plate, and a pliable sheet adapted to hold the specimen against the cover plate.

2. In a device for exhibiting specimens, a transparent cover plate, a pliable sheet a pliable sheet adapted to hold the specimen against the cover plate, and means for securing the sheet adjacent the edges of the cover plate.

3. In a device for exhibiting specimens, a transparent cover plate and a surroundin frame comprising a cover or lid, a tray, and adapted to hold the speci men against the cover plate, the edges of said sheet being held between said cover or lid and tray.

4. In a device for exhibiting specimens, a transparent cover plate and a surrounding frame com rising a cover or lid, a tray having vertica side walls, and a pliable sheet for holding the specimen against the cover plate, the edges of said sheet being frictionally held between the vertical walls of the tray and the'frame surrounding the cover plate.

5. In a device for exhibiting specimens, a transparent cover plate and a surrounding frame comprising a cover or lid, a tray, apliable sheet for holding the specimen against the cover plate, the edges of said sheet being held between the cover or lid and the tray, and a filling of yieldable material in the tray beneath the sheet.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto signed my name in the presence of two witnesses.

WARREN M. FOOTE. Witnesses:

WILLIAM S. A'roHIsoN, ELIZABETH J. BLOOMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2619225 *Sep 26, 1950Nov 25, 1952A L Siegel Co IncMothproof garment bag
US3450458 *May 27, 1966Jun 17, 1969Potrzuski Stanley GField specimen microscope
US3620596 *Sep 18, 1970Nov 16, 1971Aerojet General CoMicroscope slides
US4158266 *Oct 29, 1976Jun 19, 1979Gilmour Richard LShock absorbent display mounting apparatus and method
US4431276 *Nov 12, 1980Feb 14, 1984Carl-Zeiss-Stiftung, Heidenheim/BrenzSpecimen-holder system for upright microscopes
US6856458 *Oct 9, 2001Feb 15, 2005Lucid, Inc.Tissue specimen holder
US7146759 *Feb 14, 2005Dec 12, 2006John Louis BellTwo-faced optional mat picture frames
US8875430 *Jun 11, 2010Nov 4, 2014Lynn Elizabeth LeboffDisplay frame
US9052523 *Mar 19, 2012Jun 9, 2015Caliber Imaging & Diagnostics, Inc.Cassette for facilitating optical sectioning of a retained tissue specimen
US9128024Dec 22, 2004Sep 8, 2015Caliber Imaging & Diagnostics, Inc.Tissue specimen holder
US9229210Feb 26, 2013Jan 5, 2016Caliber Imaging And Diagnostics, Inc.Tissue specimen stage for an optical sectioning microscope
US20050157386 *Dec 22, 2004Jul 21, 2005Greenwald Roger J.Tissue specimen holder
US20060070286 *Feb 14, 2005Apr 6, 2006Bell John LTwo faced optional mat picture frames
US20110305854 *Jun 11, 2010Dec 15, 2011Lynn Elizabeth LeboffDisplay frame
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/297, 359/398, 40/800, 206/583, 434/299
Cooperative ClassificationG09B23/36