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Publication numberUS1004740 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1911
Filing dateSep 22, 1908
Priority dateSep 22, 1908
Publication numberUS 1004740 A, US 1004740A, US-A-1004740, US1004740 A, US1004740A
InventorsPeabody A Brown
Original AssigneePeabody A Brown
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric alarm.
US 1004740 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. A. BROWN. ELECTRIC ALARM. APPLICATION FILED 31:21. 22, 1908.

1,004,740. Patented 0011.3,1911.

4 SHEETB-BHEET a 1 m d 4 a w 3 :IIIJ W r 7 Q o COLUMBIA PLANDCIRAPH Cm. WASHINGTON, D. C.

P. A. BROWN. ELECTRIC ALARM. APILIUATION FILED BBPT.22,190B.

Patented Oct. 3, 1911.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

P. A. BROWN.

ELECTRIC ALARM.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 22,190B.

Patented Oct. 3, 1911.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

COLUMBIA PMNOORAPH cm. WASHINGTON, n c.

P. A, BROWN. ELECTRIC ALARM.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 22, 1908. 1,004,740.

4 BHEETS-BHEET 4.

COLUMBIA FLANOGRAPH cu Patented Oct. 3, 1911.

PEABODY A. BROW'N, 0F DENVER, COLORADO.

ELECTRIC All-ABET.

oomao.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed September 22, 1908.

Patented Get. 3, 1911.

Serial No. 454,273.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, PEABODY A. BROWN, a citizen of the United States, residing in the city and county of Denver and State of Colorado, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Electric Alarms; and I do declare the following to be a full, clear, and exactdescription of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters and figures of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

My invention relates to improvements in electrically operated alarms, being more especially intended for use in small cities or. towns having no regular fire department, and which are therefore obliged to rely upon volunteer service.

An important feature of my improved construction consists in providing a maga-' zine containing cartridges adapted to be exploded through the instrumentality of a spark coil, through which the electric current is passed, by operating a call-box either through human agency or automatically, as may be desired. In my improved construction as disclosed in the drawing, no means are illustrated for automatically operating the alarm. It is evident, however, that this may be done thermostatically, if desired. Furthermore, in my improved construction, provision is made whereby any desired number of cartridges may be exploded at one operation of the alarm mechanism. Moreover, the explosions are so arranged and timed as to indicate the number of the callbox from which the alarm is given, or where the initial operation takes place. Hence, in a town or small city, assuming that the magazine of cartridges is centrally located, the entire population may be apprised, not only of the fire but of its location.

Having briefly outlined my improved construction, I will proceed to describe the same in detail, reference being made to the accompanying drawing in which is illustrated an embodiment thereof.

In this drawing, Figure 1 is a diagrammatic View illustrating my improved firealarm system. Fig. 2 illustrates the operating mechanism which may be located in a box suitably mounted in any desired location. Fig. 3 is a view showing one side of the mechanism, also the circuit wires connecting the various contacts with the cartridges of the magazine, the latter, however, not being shown in this view. Fig. 6 is a top plan View of the magazine shown mounted upon a pole, the latter being shown in section taken on the line 6-6 Fig. 2. Fig. 7 isan edge view of the same, or a view looking in the direction of arrow 7 Fig. 6. Fig. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View taken through the magazine cutting one of the cartridges longitudinally. Fig. 9 is a similar view showing the parts in difierent relative positions. Fig. 10 is a detail view on a larger scale illustrating a disk and metallic brush which, it may be assumed, forms a part of the mechanism in the callboxes 25. This construction is simply conventional for the purpose of explaining the manner of producing a predetermined number of explosions by the operation of any callbox, whereby the number of the box may be indicated by the variation of intervals between explosions. Fig. 11 is a detail View of the induction coil 45.

The same reference characters indicate the same parts in all the views.

Let the numeral 5 designate a disk composed of insulating material, and provided with an opening 6 in which is located operating mechanism of the clock-works orcer. This mechanism comprises a rectangular frame 7, and a train of wheels 8 actuated by a spring 9. One of these wheels is a pinion 10 carrying an arm 12. The spring 9 is normally under tension and has a tendency to actuate the arm 12 which is normally locked against movement by a hook-shaped armature 13 of an electromagnet 14, mounted upon the disk 5 and whose terminals are respectively connected with conductors 15 and 16. The conductor 15 leads to a contact 17 located adjacent the armature 18 of an electro-magnet 19 whose terminals are respectively connected by means of conductors 20 and 21 with the poles 22 and 23 of an electrical source 24. The conductors 20 and 21, together with the source 24, constitute the main circuit of the system in which are located any desired number of call-boxes 25. This main circuit is normally closed and the armature 18 is therefore normally held in contact with the magnet 19 being thereby separated from the contact 17. The armature 18 is connected by means of a conductor 26 with a pole 27 of an electrical source 28. The conductor 16 leads from one terminal of the magnet 14 to a magnet 29 having an armature 30 normally in engagement with a contact 31 from which leads a conductor 32, its extremity remote from the contact 31 being connected with the metallic part of the clock mechanism 33 as shown at 34. A conductor 35 leads from the armature 30 to the pole 27 of the electrical source 28. From the terminal of the magnet 29 0pposite that with which the conductor 16 is connected, leads a conductor 36 to a magnet 37 whose armature 38 is normally disengaged from the magnet and also separated from a contact 39 connected with a conductor 40 one extremity of which is connected with a pole 41 of an electrical source 42, while its opposite extremity leads to the brush A which is mounted on the insulated disk 5 and held in electrical contact with the sleeve B of the arm 84.

From the armature 38 leads a conductor 44 to aspark coil 45 which is connected by a conductor 46 with a pole 47 of the elect-rical source 42. Also leading from the spark coil 45 is a conductor 48 whose extremity remote from the said coil is connected with the frame 49 of the magazine 64, as shown at 50.

From the terminal of the magnet 37 opposite that with which the conductor 36 is connected, leads a conductor 51 to one extremity of a magnet 52 from whose opposite extremity leads a conductor 53 to a conductor 54. From the armature 55 of the magnet 52, leads a conductor 56 whose extremity remote from the armature 55 is connected as shown at 57 ,with. the conductor35.

Located adjacent the armature 55, is a contact 58 from which leads a conductor 59 to a binding post 60 of an electric bell 61. From a post 62 of the bell, the conductor 54 leads to a pole 63 of the electrical source 28. As shown in the drawing, the magazine 64 is composed of a frame-work or body part 49 and a cover 65 hinged to the body part as shown at 66, the latter being provided with upwardly projecting cars 67 for the purpose. The extremity of the cover remote from the hinging axis, is provided with depending lugs 4 through which screws 68 are passed and threaded into the body of the magazine whereby the cover is held securely in place in operative relation with the body of the magazine. The body of the magazine is provided wit-h openings 69 adapted to receive cartridges 70 having shells or cases 71, containing powder 72, held in place by a plug 73. The upper extremity of the cartridge is surrounded by a metal rim 74 having a pin 75 whose upper extremity is exposedat the top of the cartridge. This pin passes through the reinforced top part of the case, its lower extremity projecting into a quantity 76 of smokeless powder. It is preferred that the upper portion of the contents of the cartridge where the spark is produced, should contain smokeless powder, since it is found by experiment to facilitate the ignition of thepowder contents 72 which forms the principal portion of the explosive material. From the metallic rim 74 a wire 77 leads through the top of the cartridge, its inner extremity being hook-shaped, as shown at 78, and occupying a position close to the inner extremity 7 9 of the pin 75. The wire and the pin, however, are separated by a narrow space resulting in a spark, when the electrical circuit in which they are located is otherwise closed. It must be understood that the body 49 of the magazine is composed of metal and it will be remembered that the conductor 48 leads thereto from the sparking plug.

Embedded in the cover 65 of the magazine is a wire coil 80 which is separated from the metallic part of the cover by insulating material 81. hen the cover is closed the lower extremity of this coil 80 forms a good contact with the top of the pin 75. The upper extremity of the said coil merges into a conductor 82 which leads to a metallic contact 83 mounted upon the insulating disk 5. There is a contact 83 upon this disk for each cartridge in the magazine 64, and these contacts are arranged upon the disk in a circle and at regular intervals, all of the said contacts lying in the path of the upper extremity of an arm 84 whose inner extremity is connected with the main arbor 43 of the clock mechanism. This clock mechanism, so-called in this specification, consists simply of a spring actuated train of gears which when the spring is wound up, would be in mot-ion unless locked against movement. In the mechanism shown the armature 13 of the magnet 14 normally forms a stop which locks the gears against movement through the instrumentality of the arm 12, which being made fast to the spindle of one of the gears, rotates therewith. \Vhen this arm 12 is released by'the movement of the armature 13 toward the magnet 14 due to the energizing of the latter, the arm 12 moves until it reaches an armature 85 of a magnet 86 also mounted upon the insulating disk 5. From one extremity of this armature a conductor 87 leads to one terminal of the magnet 86, while from the opposite terminal leads a conductor 88 to the conductor 54.

In the operation of the mechanism the armature 13 is first actuated to release the arm 12 when the clock mechanism moves under the influence of its spring until the arm 12 engages the armature 85 which forms a temporary check to the movement of the clock mechanism and consequently to the movement of the arm or hand 84, which it is assumed travels about half the distance between the two contacts 83 while the arm 12 is moving from one armature to the other. Practically as soon as the arm 12 comes in contact with the armature 85 the magnet 86 is energized and acts upon the armature 85 to move the latter sufficiently to allow the arm 12 to continue its movement until it makes a complete rotation and again encounters the armature 13 which has returned to its normal position by virtue of the deenergizing of the magnet 14. During this circuit the arm 84 moves from one contact 83 to another.

By virtue of my improved mechanism, any desired number of cartridges may be exploded at a single operation and these eX plosions will indicate to the surrounding inhabitants, the location of the fire, since the explosions indicate the number of the callboX, the latter presumably being in the vicinity of the conflagration.

As heretofore explained, all of the callboXes 25 are connected in operative relation with the main circuit or that composed of the conductors 20 and 21 and the electrical source 241. The mechanism of each call-box is of ordinary character, but it may be assumed, for the purposes of this specification, that as the lever 89 of the call-boX is-pulled, a disk 90 (see Fig. 10) is moved to break the contact between the disk and a metallic brush 91, the said disk being provided with recesses 92 and parts 93, 94 and 95 between these recesses.

From what has been stated heretofore, it will be understood that the main circuit composed of the conductors 20 and 21 and the source 24, is normally closed, whereby the magnet 19 is energized and its armature 18 held away from the cont-act l7. Assuming that the arm 89 of the call-box is moved and a corresponding movement imparted to the disk 90, whereby the brush 91 becomes disengaged from the disk, it will be understood that the main circuit is broken, and the magnet 19 deenergized allowing the armature 18 to drop from engagement with the contact 17, and in this event the current passes from the poles 27 of the electrical source 28 through the conductor 26, the armature 18, the contact 17 and the conductor 15 to the magnet 14, which, being energized, actuates the armature 13 sufficiently to disengage the arm 12 allowing the latter to move from the armature 13 to the armature 85. At. the same time the current passes through the conductor 16 to the magnet 29 energizing the latter and moving the armature 30 away from the contact 31. The current also passes simultaneously through the conductor 36 to the magnet 37 whereby the latter is energized and its armature 38 moves sufficiently to bring it into engagement with the contact 39, thus closing the circuit in which the spark coil 45 is located. From the magnet 37 the current passes simultaneously with its passage to the magnets 141, 29 and 37, to the magnet 52 which, being energized, acts upon its armature 55 to bring the latter into engagement with the contact 58, thus closing the circuit in which the bell 61 is located.

From what has been already said, it will be understood that during the break in the main circuit due to the movement of the lever 89 of the call-box 25, all of the magnets 1-1, 29, 37 and 52 will be energized while the magnet 86 will be denergized, since the armature 30 is a part of the circuit in which the last named magnet is located and this armature is separated from the contact 31. It may be stated that, in order to complete the circuit of the magnet 86, the current may be said to pass from the pole 27 of the source 28, through the conductor 35, the armature 30, the conductor 32, to the clock mechanism, and from the arm 12 when in the dotted line position (see Fig. 1) through the armature 85 and the conductor 87 to the magnet, and thence through the conductor 88 to the conductor 51 and finally to the opposite pole 63 of the source 28, thus the arm 81 will be caused to travel by virtue of the clock mechanism to an intermediate position between the two contacts 83. As soon, however, as the main circuit has been closed, due to the bringing of one of the metallic parts 93, 94, or 95 into engagement with the brush 91, the armature 18 is moved away from the contact 17, thus breaking the circuit through all of the magnets 14, 29, 37 and 52, but closing it through the magnet 86 since as soon as the magnet 29 is deenergized, its armature 30 returns to its normal position (presumably under the influence of a spring not shown), in engagement with the contact 31. Hence the magnet 86 being energized, its armature 85 is moved sufliciently to release the arm 12 which, being in the dotted line position, (see Fig. 1) is allowed to continue its circuit or until it comes in contact with the armature l3. During this movement of the arm 12 from the armature 85 to the armature 13, it is assumed that the clock mechanism has moved 'sutficiently to cause the arm 84: to travel broken, and during this last break the operation hereto-fore described is repeated, al lowing the arm 84 to engage the next contact 83. The sparking circuit is then completed through one of the cartridges, and the latter exploded. This circuit may be indicated as follows: Starting from the pole 47 of the battery 42, the current may be said to pass through the spark coil 45 and the conductor 48 to the body 49 of the magazine 64 and from this body part through the wire 77 into the powder contents of the cartridge, a spark being produced as the current is passing from the extremity 76 of the wire to the pin 75. The circuit is completed from this pin through the wire coil 80, the conductor 82, the contact 83 the arm 84, its sleeve B, the bush A, and the conductor 40 which leads to the opposite pole of the source 42. The circuit of the primary coil is completed through conductor 46, leading from pole 47 of the battery 42, spark coil 45, conductor 44, armature 38, contact 39, and conductor 40, to the opposite pole 41 of the battery 42, the induced current being produced in harmony with the primary current during the make-andbreak of the primary circuit by the motion of the armature'38.

If it is necessary, or if the number of the particular call-box 25 is such as to require it, there may be several cartridges exploded for every movement of the arm 89 of the call-box; and in this event, it will be understood from what has just been explained, that the arm 84 will be moved by the clock mechanism during the periods that the main circuit in which the magnet is located, is interrupted or broken, the said arm 84 being interrupted in its movement every time the continuity of the main circuit is restored.

In order that all of the cartridges c011- tained in the magazine may not be exploded before the magazine is replenished, provision is made for indicating the fact that the magazine is approaehng depletion, the said mechanism serving to announce this fact by operating a buzzer, or other electric alarm, located within the hearing of the person whose business it is to replenish the magazine, when the arm 84 has completed any predetermined portion of its circuit. In order to accomplish this object, an electrical source 96 (see Figs. 3 and 4) is provided. The pole 97 of this source is con nected by means of a conductor 98 with a part 99 of the clock mechanism, the said part being stationary but in electrical contact with a movable part 100 of the mechanism, the last named part carrying a spring 101 adapted to engage a metal part 102 which is connected by means of a conductor 103 with an alarm 104 from which leads a conductor 105 to the opposite pole 106 of the electrical source 96. It must be understood that the spring arm 101 is so connected with the clock mechanism that it travels with the arbor 43 upon which the arm 84 is mounted. Hence, it will be understood that the parts 101 and 102 may be so arranged as to close the circuit through the alarm 104 when the arm 84 has reached any predetermined part of its circuit.

As illustrated in the drawing, the operating parts of the mechanism may be mounted in a box or casing 107, which may be mounted upon a pole 108 at any desired distance from the ground. The cartridge magazine 4 as shown in the drawing, is rigidly secured to the said pole, the body of the magazine being provided with a bracket 109 which is preferably shaped to fit the curved surface of the pole. Bolts 110 are passed through registering openings formed in the pole and bracket, whereby the magazine is securely held in place. It is important to have the magazine well secured, in order that the vibrations due to the explosion of the cartridges may not loosen the magazine or shake it from its support.

In order to prevent possible injury from concussion to persons who may be standing in the vicinity of the magazine when the explosion takes place, an inclined plate 111 is secured at one extremity to the pole, the plate passing underneath the magazine, whereby the vibrations of the atmosphere, due to the explosion, are deflected and their force dissipated. This inclined plate also serves as a deflecting device for the debris resulting from the explosion of the cartridges, to prevent their accumulation directly underneath the magazine.

The disk carrying the clock mechanism, together with the magnets 19, 29, 37 and 52, together with the spark coil and the sources of electricity designated 28 and 42, are mounted in a casing 112 supported within the box 107 by means of springs 113 whichconnect the said casing to upper and lower cross-pieces 114 and 115 of the box. These springs are employed to relieve the mechanism from the vibrations due to the explosion of the cartridges. This construction and arrangement makes it practicable to confine the entire apparatus within a comparatively small space. Furthermore, it is fully protected from the weather and also from injury by evilly disposed or unauthorized persons.

The reason for interrupting the movement of the spring-actuated arm 84 between two contacts 83, is to prevent the possible movement of the arm by virtue of its inertia or momentum, farther than is necessary. In other words, if it were not for the interruption produced by the armature 85 to the movement of the arm 12, the arm or hand 84 might move a sufficient distance to cause it to engage a number of contacts 83, whereby a corresponding number of explosions would be produced, the said number being greater than is desired or intended as a result of the operation of a given call-box.

For the purposes of this application it is assumed that the armatures of the various electro magnets are normally spring held in a position away from the magnets, and that their movement under the influence of the spring is limited. It is not considered necessary to illustrate these features in the drawing since these characteristics of the element in question are common in electrical appliances.

After the cartridges have been exploded, or whenever it may be necessary to replenish the magazine, the screws 68 are removed, and the lid is lifted. The body of the magazine is thus exposed at the top, and the cartridge openings may be readily supplied.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. In an alarm mechanism, the combination of a magazine cartridge located therein, a spark coil and a plurality of spark coil circuits in which the cartridges are respectively located, the said circuits being adapted to be electrically connected with the spark coil, and a spring-actuated device for closing the spark coil circuits through the cartridges of the magazines successively, substantially as described.

2. Alarm mechanism, comprising a cartridge magazine, a spark coil, a plurality of spark coil circuits in which the cartridges of the magazine are respectively located, the said circuits being adapted to be electrically connected with the spark coil, a spring-actuated device for closing the said circuits through the cartridges of the magazine successively, and means for normally locking the said device against movement.

3. Alarm mechanism, comprising a magazine containing powder cartridges, a spark coil, a plurality of spark coil circuits in which the cartridges are respectively located, the said circuits being adapted to be electrically connected with the spark coil, a spring-actuated device for closing the said circuits through the said cartridges respectively, means for locking the said device against movement, and electro-magnetic means for releasing the locking mechanism, substantially as described.

4:. Alarm mechanism comprising a main circuit, call-boxes located therein, a magazine containing cartridges, a plurality of electric circuits in which the cartridges are respectively located, the circuits being interrupted within each cartridge to produce a spark for ignition purposes when the circuit is closed therethrough, and a suitable connection between the call-box and the spark circuits whereby as the former is broken, the latter is closed.

5. The combination with a normally closed main circuit having call boxes located therein, of a magazine containing cartridges, a spark coil, a plurality of spark coil circuits in which the cartridges are respectively located, the said circuits being adapted to be electrically connected with the spark coil, and a suitable connection between the call box circuit and the spark coil circuits, whereby as the call box circuit is broken one of the spark coil circuits is closed, substan tially as described.

6. The combination of a call-box circuit, of a spark-coil, a magazine containing cartridges, each cartridge being located in a distinct circuit connected with the spark coil, and electro-magnetic means interposed between the call-box circuit and the sparkcoil circuits whereby as the call-box is operated, the spark coil circuits may be closed and broken.

7. The combination with a call-box circuit, of a spark-coil, a magazine containing cart-ridges, each magazine having a distinct circuit in which a spark-coil is located, spring-actuated means for successively closing the magazine circuits, means for normally locking the springactuated means against movement, an electro-magnet for releasing the said locking means, and a suitable connection between the said magnet, the call-box circuit and the spark-coil circuit,

whereby as the call-box circuit is broken, theelectromagnet circuit and the spark-coil circuit are both closed, whereby the magnet is energized and acts to release the said lookingdevice, simultaneously with the closing of the cartridge circuits through the sparkcoil, the spring-actuated device serving to complete the cartridge circuits successively, substantially as described.

8. Alarm mechanism comprising a cartridge magazine, a spark coil, a distinct circuit connected with the spark coil for each cart-ridge of the magazine, and a motoractuated device located in the spark coil circuits for successively closing the circuits in which the cartridges are located, substantially as described.

9. In alarm mechanism, the combination of a magazine containing cartridges, a spark coil, circuits in which the cartridges are respectively located, each circuit being connected with the spark coil, a motor-actuated device for successively closing the circuits in which the cartridges are located, and means for controlling the said motor whereby one or more cartridge circuits may be closed at a single operation of the motor, substantially as described.

10. The combination of a magazine containing powder-filled cartridges, electrical circuits in which the cart-ridges are located, each circuit being arranged to produce a t spark in contact with the powder of its cartridge, a motor-actuated device for successsively closing the cartridge circuits, means for controlling the motor whereby apredetermined number of cartridge circuits may be closed during a single cycle of the motor, and means for temporarily interrupting the motor, during a single cycle.

11. The combination with a magazine containing cartridges, electrical circuits in which the cartridges are respectively located, a disk having insulated contacts located in the respective cartridge circuits, a spring-actuated motor, an arm connected with the said motor and located in each cartridge circuit, the aforesaid contacts being so arranged as to be engaged by the said arm while the latter is making a single cycle,

whereby the cart-ridge circuits are successively closed, substantially as described.

12. The combination of a cartridge-holding magazine, electrical circuits in which the cartridges of the magazine are respectively located, and an electromagnetic relay adapted to successively close a number of said circuits only corresponding with the number of times its magnetic coil is energized and denergized.

sively closing the cartridge circuits, and an 1;

elect-ro-magnetic relay adapted to control said motor, the motor being locked against movement when the magnet coil is deenergized and released when the magnet coil is energized, substantially as described.

- In testimony whereof I afiiX my signature in presence of two witnesses.

PEABODY A. BROWN.

Witnesses A. J. OBRIEN, A. EBERT OBRIEN.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.

CII

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WO1994025204A1 *Apr 25, 1994Nov 10, 1994Burkhard LabodArrangement for connecting a stopper rod for a metallurgical vessel with a lifting device, suitable stopper rod for the arrangement and process for producing the arrangement
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/287, 340/385.1
Cooperative ClassificationG08B25/00