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Publication numberUS1009945 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1911
Filing dateMay 25, 1910
Priority dateMay 25, 1910
Publication numberUS 1009945 A, US 1009945A, US-A-1009945, US1009945 A, US1009945A
InventorsThomas Veitch
Original AssigneeWalter S Thomson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal-combustion engine.
US 1009945 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. VBITGH.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE. APPLICATION FILED MAY 25,1910.

1,009,945. Patented Nov. 28, 1911.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 WITNESSES: INVENTOR T. VEITGH. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

AYPLIUATIOH FILED MAY 25,1910.

1,009,945.. I Patented Nov. 28, 1911.

I an Ex I: "V

M a w Q w Q M/ITAIESSES: ENTOR MAM/WV iii UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

IHOHAS VEI'ICK, OI D'O'HOIIT, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOB TO WALTER S. THOMSON, OF

' NEW YORK, N. Y.

INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE.

Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Nov, 23, 1911, Application filed ma as, 1910. Serial in. 683,374.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Tnonas Vnrron, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Dumont, in the county of Bergen and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Internal- Combustion Engines, of which the following is a specification.

The present invention relates to improvements in internal combustion engines, and more particularly to means for admitting one or more of the constituents of the combustible charge to the compression chamber of the engine.

'One of the objects of the invention is to provide a valve construction for controlling, while the engine is running, the admission of the combustible charge, or of one or more of its constituents,-to the crank-case in such a manner that the point of admission and the point of the cutoff of the charge entering the compression chamber of the engine may he predetermined and varied at will, so as to control thereby the speed and power of the engine.

Another object of the invention is to construct a valve mechanism for a reversible two cycle engine which is very simple in construction, eflicient and reliable in operation, consisting of very few parts of simple design and possessing the features above mentioned.

With these and other objects in view, which will-more fully appear as the nature of the invention is better understood, the same consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the several parts hereinafter fully described, pointed out in the appended claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, it being understood that various changes may be made in the size, proportion and construction of parts without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

One of the many possible embodiments of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a side elevation of an engine constructed in accordance with the present invention, the supply pipe being removed to more clearly show the interior parts; Fig. 2 is a section taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view of the valve construction, showing the parts in the positions indicated in Fig. 1 of the drawings;

Figs. 4 and 5 are dis rammatic views of the Valve mechanism s owing the parts in.

difierent positions from that shown in Fig.

3; 6 and 7 are dia rammatic views of modi ed constructions o the valve showing he parts in two different positions, and

t Fi 8 is a section taken on line 8, 8 of Fig. 6.

eferring now more particularly to Figs.

1 to 5,-inclusive, the numeral 10 designates the cylinder of the engine, having, in the case shown; the usual water-jacket l1, and being mounted upon the crank-case 12, which is rod 18 with the piston 19, which is provided with the usual deflector 20. A transfer passage 21 connects the interior of the crankcase with the inlet port. 22 of the cylinder,

opposite to which is arranged the exhaust port, from which the exhaust pipe 23 leads in the usual manner. Upon the crankshaft is mounted a fly-wheel 2 for well known reasons. Thus far the construction and operation of the engine do not differ in any essential way from the engine heretofore in use.

Upon the side 25 of the crank-case 12 is arranged a chamber 26, to which leads a supply pipe 27 conducting to the said chamber either the combustible charge, or air, if the engine is provided with a fuel injection device. This chamber communicates with the interior of the crankcase through an arc-shaped opening 28, which extends over an angular distance of about 180 for a purpose to be hereinafter described. The communication between the chamber 26 and the interior of the crank-case is controlled by a rotary valve 29, which comprises a opening and closing edges, respectively, of the valve, as will be hereinafter more fully described.

In the inner surface of the side of the crank-case is provided an annular groove 35, which is arranged concentrically with the opening-28 in the crank-case side. In thisgroove are shiftably mounted two independent ring segments 36 and 37, which are provided upon their outer peripheral portions with teeth 38 and 39, respectively, meshing with pinions 40 and 41, respectively, which pinions are mounted upon shafts 4:2 and 43,

adapted to be operated from the outer side of the crank-case. The ring segment 36 serves to determine the point of admission of the charge or one of its constituents to the crank-case, while the ring segment 37 is of the fuel should be always near the lower dead center of the crank. The segment 37 is of greater angular length than the segment 36 and is arranged to move through a greater angular distance, whereby the entering charge may be cut off very shortly after its point of admission, or may be allowed to enter the crank-case throughout the entire upward stroke of the piston and for some distance over the upper dead center of the crank, or in other words throughout the entire time through which vacuum is present in the crank-case, or the charge may enter the crank-case for any time between these two limits. I

The operation of the device is as follows: As the crankshaft rotates, the combustible charge or one of its constituents will be admitted into the crank-case as soon as the opening edge 33 of the rotary valve 29 passes the edge 36 of the segment 36, and such admission will last until the closing edge 34 of the segment 37, if the engine is running in the direction of the arrow indicated in Fig. 1 of the drawings. If the segments 36 and 37 are shifted by the pinions 40 and 41 into the positions shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings, the combustible'charge or one of its constituents will be admitted into the crankcase during the entire upward stroke of the piston. The rotary valve begins to open at the point marked by the line I and the cutoif occurs at the line marked II. The angular distance between the lines I and II .plus the angular distance betweenthe edges 33 and 34 of the rotary valve is equal to about 180 and corresponds to the upward travel of the piston. The. opening edge 33 of the rotary valve passes the edge 36 of the segment 36 when the crank is in its lower dead center and the closing edge 34 of the rotary valve passes the edge 37 of the segment. 37 when the crank is about in its upper dead center. The position shown in Flg. 3 may be termed ithe normal or central position of the valve mechanism.

In shifting the segment 37 almost into contact with the segment 36,as shown in Fig. ,4 of the drawings, the admission wi'l'l begin when the crank has. just passed its lower dead center andis in the position III, and 'will cease-"at position IV, that is at a point before vacuum in the crank-case has been sufliciently formed, whereby only a very small charge will be admitted into the crank-case. In moving the segment 37v so that its edge 37 contacts with the edge 36 of the segment 36, the opening 28 is entirely closed and the engine will come to rest. In shifting, however, the segment 37 so that it uncovers the opening 28 in the crank-case side to a large extent, for instance, as shown in Fig. 5 of the drawings, the admission will begin after the crank has passed the lower dead center, after reaching the position shown by the dotted line marked V, and the communication betweenthe supply of fuel or one of its constituents and the crank-case will be closed when the crank center passes dotted line marked VI, that is after it has passed considerably the upper dead center. Obviously a full opening of the valve is thus obtained during the time of the most effective vacuum in thecrank-case. If the segments 36 and 37 are shifted so that their edges 36 and 37 coincide with straight edges 28 and 28 of the opening 28, the communication between the supply of fuel or air and the crank-case will remain open during almost three-fourths of a revolution of the crankshaft.

It is obvious that .for every given load and speed of the engine, a particular charge of course, "if the point of admission and the point of cut-off of the charge can be varied relative to the crank while the engine is running. With the device herein described, the admission to and cut-off of the charge or one of its constituents in two cycle engines can be governed so that the engine can be throttled and run quietly on light loads, and a greater charge can be admitted for full loads and high speeds.

While in Figs. 3, 4 and 5 three positions of the device have been shown, it will be easily seen that the segments may be set to any intermediate positions, which may be required for the change in speed and load. The ring segments 'may be set by. hand, or they may be shifted by a governor into the most effective position necessary to the'most satisfactory operation'of the engine both for speed and power.

A modification of the device is shown in Figs. 6 to 8, inclusive, which controls the admission of the charge to the crank-case, and is adapted at the same time to reverse the direction of rotation of the engine by a very simple operation. The crank-case side is provided in this case with a recess 46, to which leads a cylindrical opening 47 in communication with the supply of fuel or with the air, as the case, may be. A groove l8 is formed concentrically with the recess 46, and in this groove are arranged the ring segment 49 for controlling the point of admission of the charge and the ring segment 50 tor controlling the point of cut-oil of the charge. A projection 51 is formed on the inner face of the ring segment 49, fitting snugly the recess 46 and dividing thus the same into two non-communicating sections.

If it is intended to run the engine in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig. 6 ol' the drawings, the projection 51 upon the segment 49 is shifted together with the segment 4L9 so that the projection comes to lie on the right-hand side of the opening 47. The edge 49 terms then the opening edge or the cut-off valve and the edge 50 of the segment 50 the closing edge. In order to reverse the direction of rotation of the engine, the projection 51 is brought to the lefthand side of the opening 47, as shown in Fig. it of the drawings, when-the edge 49 of the segment will form the opening edge of the catch valve. The segment 50 is then set so that its edge 50 occupies the desired position, that is to say either an advance or throttle position, or any other intermediate position.

While herein certain relations between the size of the opening in the crank-case and the distance between the straight edges of the rotary valve have been specified, and a particular arrangement, sizes and forms of the cut-ofl' valve portions have been shown and described, it will be easily seen that the relations, sizes and forms mentioned may be varied according to the requirements, and the device will still come within the scope of the appended claims, as the invention lies mainly in the combination of a rotary valve with a cut-ofi' valve comprising a structure, whereby the point of admission and the point of the cut-01f of the charge may be predetermined and varied according to the conditions at hand. The rotary valve may, ofvcourse, be operated by means connected directly or indirectly with the crankshaft. Obviously instead ,of the horseshoe-shaped rotary disk a slotted rotary disk may be made use of.

What I claim is:-

1.. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary valve adapted to control the communication between said. opemng and the interior of said chamber, and means varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of opening and closin of said communication relative to the eye e of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

2. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compressionchamber of the enginehaving an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary valve adapted to control the communication between said opening and the interior of said chamber, and means interposed between said opening and said valve varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of opening and closing of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

3. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an openin in one of its'walls, of a rotary disk'adapte to control :the communication between said opening and the interior of said chamber, and means for varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of opening and closing of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

4. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary disk adapted to control the communication tetween said opening and the interior of said chamber, and means interposed between said opening and said disk for varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of'opening and closing of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

5. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the crank-case of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a crankshaft arranged in said crank-case, a rotary valve attached to said crankshaft adapted to control the communication between said opening and the interior of said crank-case, and means varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of opening and closing of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine. 7

6. In an internal combustion en 'ne, the combination with the crank-case o the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a crankshaft arranged in said crank-case, a rotary valve attached to said crankshaft adapted to control the communication between said opening andthe interior of said crank-case, and means interposed between said opening and said valve varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of opening and-closin ofsaid communication relative to the eye e of operation within the cylinder of the engine. 7

7. Inian internal combustion engine, the

combination with the crank-case of the en-.

gine having an opening in one of its walls, of

a crankshaft arranged in said crank-case, a.

rotary disk attached to said crankshaft adapted to control the communication between said. opening andthe interior of said crank-case, and means for varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of opening and closing of said communica tion relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

8. In an internal combustion en 'ne, the

combination with the crank-case o the en-' of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary valve adapted to control the communication between. 'said opening and the interior of said chamber, and means independent of said valve for predetermining and varying the size of said opening and the angular relation of the opening and closing points of said communication relative .to the crank of the engine.

10. In an internal combustion engine, the combination With the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary valve adapted to control the communication between said open ing and the interior of said chamber, and means interposed between said opening and said valve for predetermining and varying the size of said opening and the angular relation of the opening and closing points of said communication relative to the crank of the engine;

11. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its Walls, of a rotary disk adapted to control the-communication between said open-' ing and the interior of said chamber, and means for predetermining and varying the size of said opening and the angular relation of the opening and closing points of said communication relative to the crank of the engine.

12. In an internal combustion engine, the combination" with the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary disk adapted to control the communication between said opening and the interior of said chamber, and means interposed between said opening and said disk for 'predeterminin and varying the size of said opening an the angular relation ofthe opening and closing points ofsaid communication relative to the crank of the engine.

13. 'In an internal combustion engine, the

gine having an opening in one of, its walls,

combination with the crank-case of the en- 7 of a crank shaft arranged in'said crankcase, a rotary valve attached to said crank shaft adapted to control thecommunication between said opening. and the interior of said crank-case, and means for p'redet'erminbetween said opening and the interior of said crank-case, and means interposed between said opening and said valve for predetermining and varying the size of said opening and the angular relation of the opening and closing points of said communication relative to the crank of the engine.

15. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the crank-case of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a crankshaft arranged in said crankcase, a rotary-disk attached to said crankshaft adapted to control the communication between said opening and the interior of said crank-case, and means for predetermining and varying the size of said opening and the angular relation of the opening and closing points of said communication relative to the crank of the engine.

16. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the crank-case of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a crankshaft arranged in said crankcase. a rotary disk attached to said crankshaft and adapted to control the communication between said opening and the interior of said crank-case, and means interposed between said opening and said disk for predetermining and Varying the size of said opening and the angular relation of the opening and closing points of said communication relative to. the crank of the engine.

17. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an-opening in one of its walls, of a rotary valve adapted to control the communication between said opening and the interior'ot said chamber, means for varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of opening and closing of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

18. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary disk adapted to control the communication between said open ing and the interior of said chamber, means for varying, at will, independently of each other both the points of opening and closing of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

19. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with-the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary valve adapted to con trol the communication between said opening and the interior of said chamber, and means for varying at will the point of opening only of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

20. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary valve adapted to control the communication between said opening and the interior of said chamber, and

means interposed between said opening and said valve for varying at will the point of opening only of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

21. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its Walls, of a rotary disk adapted to control the communication between said opening and the interior of said chamber, and means for varying at will the point of opening only of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine.

22. In an internal combustion engine, the combination with the compression chamber of the engine having an opening in one of its walls, of a rotary disk adapted to control the communication between said opening-and the interior of said chamber, and

means interposed between said opening and said disk for varying at will the point of opening only of said communication relative to the cycle of operation within the cylinder of the engine. v

Signed at New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, this 27th day of May, A. D. 1910.

THOMAS VEITCH.

Witnesses SIGMUND HERZOG, O. R. RADoLmFE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2489150 *Dec 10, 1945Nov 22, 1949Damon L MccoyTwo-cycle engine, crankcase compression, valve control
US3016050 *Jan 9, 1961Jan 9, 1962Garelli Mecc SpaTwo-stroke engines having automatic suction timing device
US5257601 *Feb 1, 1993Nov 2, 1993Coffin David FAdjustable rotary valve assembly for a combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/348, 123/73.00D, 123/190.3, 123/41.00R
Cooperative ClassificationF02D2041/001