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Publication numberUS1010694 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 5, 1911
Filing dateMay 6, 1909
Priority dateMay 6, 1909
Publication numberUS 1010694 A, US 1010694A, US-A-1010694, US1010694 A, US1010694A
InventorsOscar M Shannon
Original AssigneeOscar M Shannon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drier-cabinet.
US 1010694 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0. M. SHANNON.

DRIER CABINET.

APPLIOATION FILED my 6. 1909,

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DRIER. CABINET.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 6, 1909.

1,010,694. I Patented Dec. 5, 1911.

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i tvwaoeo I A 3 W00 m ter, a @w. fit. r1 aw/W UNITED STATES PATENT orrrcn OSCAR M. SHANNON, NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK.

DRIERFGAIBINET.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed Kay 6; 1909. Serial No. 494,259.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, OSCAR M. SHANNON, a citizen of the United States, residing at New Rochelle, in the county of Westchester and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Drier- Cabinet, of which the following is a full,-

clear, and exact description;

This invention relates to laundry or clothes driers adapted for use in residences, apartment buildings, hotels, laundries, fire engine houses, hospitals, sanatoriums and similar institutions; Primarily their use is for drying washed linen, garments and clothing, but 1t will be evident that the present invention is not limited to use with driers, being adapted for use in filing cases or cabinets for architects drawings, and other storage receptacles.

In a certain type of apparatus for the foregoing purposes, a plurality of rack frames have been guided or suspended to move into and out of a cabinet in vertical and parallel relation. A particular construction has made use of rack frames having horizontal rack bars which join vertical parallel uprights, the front uprights being adapted to register closely with one another in their side by side relation, so that the hot air may circulate around the rack bars, but without having an opportunity to escape from between the front uprights ofthe rack frames. The rack frames havebeen hung from overhanging tracks by means of grooved rollers,v

whereby each can be drawn out through such a range of movement as to expose the rack bars, at the same time causing the rear upright of the.rack frame to approach and partially fill the space between the front uprights of adjacent frames, in this way preventing to some degree the undue escape of the heated air when such one of the rack frames was drawn out. It has been found in this prior construction, that the suspension method of supporting the rack frames is unsightly, is liable to collect dust which drops on the clean laundry, and is uncertain in its guiding action on the racks, so that the rear uprights cannot be made wide enough to fit or re 'ster closely together with the front uprig ts when drawn out, Moreover the foregoing arrangement prevents the rack -frames from being drawn forward far enough for the rear upright to exactly. register with the adjacent ront uprights and thus prevent escape of heat. And finally the heavy rack frames, rolling in and out on the overhanging trackways, cause undesirable noise and vibration, which is transmitted to the ceiling and thence through the entire building.

' It is the object of the present invention to provide a construction having the general purposes which were first above set forth, and which overcomes these various objections and difiiculties incident to the use 0 suspended rack frames.

With this object in view, my invention consists-in the features of construction and combination as hereinafter set forth and claimed.

In the drawings: Figure lvisv a vertical vertical sectional view of the same with the drier or rack frames pushed fully in; Fig. 3 is a sectional view on the line IIIIII of Fig. 2; Fig. 4: is a perspective view of the complete drier cabinet, and Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view. 7

Referring to the drawings in which like parts are designated by the same reference sign, 1 designates a cabinet preferably formed of sheet metal, of suflicient height and width and depth to receive a series of rack frames or drier frames, as later described, and furnish a chamber or cavity therebeneath in which the heater is contained to originate the su ply of hot air. The cabinet 1 is "prefera ly constructed of sheet metal, with one side entirely open or cutaway above a certain plane 2. The space or chamber 3 below this lane is occupied by the heater, which may e of any suitable or approved construction.

4 denotes a rack or drier frame of which as many as desired may be provided, so as to substantially fill the entire cabinet when positioned vertically side by side therein. Each of these drier frames has a front vertical upright 6 and a rear vertical upright 7 both uprights having a width equal to the desired width of the rack frame and athickness and construction suflicient to give them the requisite strength and rigidity. These uprights are securely joined together by the Patented Dec. 5, 1911-.

rack bars 8, and by horizontal frame bars 9 and 10, the latter being located at the top and bottom ends of the rear upright, and

extending forwardly therefrom to the front upright. The front upright is considerably longer than the rear upright, the extra length being extended downward below the lower horizontal frame bar 10 and forming a leg 11. In this way the complete rack frame has a rectangular outline with a front side or leg extended downward through a sufilcient distance to about reach to the floor on which the cabinet rests. The rack bars 8, are of course, arranged parallel to and vertically over one another throughout the available space of the rectangular rack frame 4:. The lower frame bar 10 extends in, or just above the plane 2 previously mentioned, and which confines the upper limit of the chamber 3 in which the heating appliance or apparatus is located. Disposed in this plane 2 or perhaps slightly below the same, are a plurality of horizontal track rails -12, extending .parallel to one another, and to the direction of movement of the rack frames.

I have illustrated each rack frame provided with a casting 13 at the lower end of its rear upright 7 and on the rear face thereof, and this casting serves as a journal or bearing for two grooved rollers 15, which project slightly below the plane of the lower horizontal frame bar 10 and are located in close proximity to the two side edges thereof. With the foregoing arrangement two running rails are required for each rack frame, and I provide these by the use of channel bars 16 inverted so that their side edges or flanges form parallel running rails for the grooved rollers 15 of two adjacent track rails. The extreme outside or end track rails are simply formed of angle bars, which have a single flange forming the single track rails required at these locations. 17 designates another casting fixed to the lower end of each of the front uprights 6 and therefore closely adjacent to the floor A on which the cabinet rests. Each of these castings 17, has journals or bearing for a pair of rollers 18, which are provided with rubber tires. All of the foregoing rollers are preferably made with ball bearings, so as to secure anti-friction running qualities.

The various rack frames 4 as above described, are run into the cabinet with their grooved rollers on the channel and angle bars, and their front rubber tired. rollers on the floor A. In this relation the horizontal frame bars 9 and 10 of the respective rack frames slide against one another, thereby guiding each rack frame in an exact recti-- linear movement, strictly parallel to the planes or directions of movement of the remaining rack frames. Also in view of this guiding action of the horizontal frame bars,

1t is impossible for the rack frames to get out of adjustment or registry in such a manner that their front uprights and rear uprights interfere when they are drawn into and out of the cabinet. The latter are accordingly made closely fitting without looseness, and fit tightly together whenever they are adjacently disposed. When the rack frames 4 are pushed fully into the cabinet, the lower extensions of the front uprights are brought into abutting engagement with the front wall 20 of the cabinet at the lower portion where this wall or face has not been cut-away as above described. In this relation the main body of each rack frame is located within the cabinet and above the space or chamber 3 in which the heating ap paratus is contained. Heat is therefore free to pass up around the rack bars where it dries the clothes, the escape of the heated air being prevented by the walls of the cabinet and by the front uprights, which fit so closely adjacent to one another that there is no appreciable space or crevice between the adjacent frames.

In order to permit the free passage of the heat from the space below into the body or main portion of the cabinet, I make the lower horizontal frame bars 10 of skeleton formation. A preferred construction is that illustrated in Fig. 5, in which angle bars -21 are welded or secured together to form a rectangle having the outline of the lower horizontal frame bars 10. This construction is particularly advantageous because it provides fiat side faces on these frame bars which slide together and guide the rack frames 4, at the same time providing a recess or space in which a screen 22 may be dropped. This screen permits a free flow of heated air therethrough, and at the same time catches any clothes, linen or articles which happen to drop off the rack bars during the drying process. Furthermore the location of this screen is such as to prevent any loose hanging articles, such as a shirt sleeve for example, being caught on any projecting part or guide when the rack frames are drawn out in a manner which has been found objectionable in the prior suspended construction previously mentioned. When the rack frames are drawn out, the drying articles will be readily accessible, and furthermore will' not have come in contact with any dust or dirt which may be present in the lower chamber 3 of the cabinet. The upper horizontal frame bar 9 may be made in a like manner if desired, or may be solid, the only essential requisite being the straight side edges or faces which slide against the corresponding faces of the adjacent rack frame for guiding purposes. The position of each rack frame when drawn out is fixed by a stop 23 on its upper frame bar 9 which abuts against the upper front wall of the cabinet. In this relation the rear'upright 7 is in registry or fact that the weight is entirely supported h of any linen or clothes which happen to drop from the rack bars.

- changes in the relative dimensions of the the front walls of said frames for supportwhich the cabinet rests.

be mentioned the more certain and accurate "cabinet from an exterior stove or furnace.

of the other rack frames and fits closely so that no space is left for the escape of the heated air.

It will be observedthat each rack frame is supported Wholly from below; all the frames are guided in perfectly parallel relation in their movement into and out of the cabinet by the engagement of the horizontal frame bars 9 and 10 at the top and bottom which fit or slide closely together, but without appreciable friction, on account of the from below. With this construction the overhanging suspension which was found objectionable for various reasons above enumerated, is entirely done away witlf, and in its place a support is. provided which is not only free from all of the various objections mentioned, but has some special advantages of its own besides; Among the lattermay' guiding of the rack frames, and the catching Any sort of heater or heating medium may be employed, for example, steam, hot water, gas, electricity, or flue gases led through suitable drums or coils of th'e chamher 3. In thedrawings I have shown steam or hot water pipes 24: which extend into the It is obvious that the source ofheat may or may not be used, and that various walls 6 and 7 may be made.

The embodiment of my invention illustrated in the accompanying drawings merely illustrates one ap llcation thereof; since the structure in addi 'ion to being used as a drying cabinet, is also admirably adapted for pp: in filing architectural drawings, and the What I claim, is

1. In a drier and storage cabinet of the class described, a plurality of juxtaposed rack frames positioned formutual lateral support and guidance, whereby one or more of said frames may be freely moved into and out of the casing in-parallelism to the remaining frame or frames, and rotatablemeans directed inwardly from the front wall of said frames for supporting said wall,

2. In a drier and storage cabinetof the class described, a plurality of juxtaposed rack frames positioned for mutual lateral support and guidance, whereby one or more of said frames may be freely moved into and out of the casing in parallelism to the remaining frame or frames, and pivoted floor engaging means directed inwardly from ing said walls directly from the floor on 3. In a drier and storage cabinet of the class described, -a' plurality of juxtaposed rack frames positioned for mutual lateral support and guidance, whereby one or more of, said frames may be freely moved into and outof the casing in parallelism-to the remaining frame or frames, and rearwardly directed rollers for supporting said frames wholly from below.

4. In a drying and storage cabinet of the class described, a plurality of rack frames, rollers for supporting the'front sides of said frames from the floor on which the cabinet rests, rollers for supportinglthe rear sides of said frames from below within the cabinet,

and means forming part of each frame and guide the rack frames in their movements into and out of the cabinet.

6. In a drier and storage cabinet of the class described, apluralit of movable rack frames eachcomprising ront andrear uprights and top and bottom frame bars having a skeleton formation, a removable reticulated member .carried by said bottom frame bars, and means for ap lying heat directly beneath said:reticulatefmemben- 7. In a drying and storage cabinet of the class described, a plurality of rack frames each having front and rear uprights and top and bottom horizontal frame bars, rollers for supporting said front uprights from the floor on which the cabinet .rests, and means "Within the cabinet for supporting said rear uprights, said horizontal frame bars sliding against one another to guide the frames in movements into and out of the cabinet. I

8. In a drying and storage cabinet of the class described,- a plurality of rack frames eachcomprising front and rear vertical uprights and top and bottom horizontal frame. bars, said bottom frame bar's having a skeleton formation, and means for supporting the weight of said frames in their movement into and out of the cabinet, said frames sliding against one another along said horizontal frame bars.

9. Ina drying and storage cabinet of the class described, a plurality of rack frames each having front and rearuprights and top and bottom frame bars, the lower bar being constructed of angle irons in, a rectangular outline, a screen received between said angle irons, and means for sup said. rack frame in its movement into and out of the cabinet.

10. -In,a drying and storage cabinet of sliding against one another along their 10 the class described, a plurality of rack horizontal frame bars. frames each having front and rear uprights It witness whereof, I subscribe my signaand top and bottom frame bars, the lower ture, in the presence of two Witnesses.

5 bar being constructed of angle irons in a rectangular outline, a screen received be- OSCAR SHANNON tween said angle irons, and means for sup- Witnesses: porting said rack frame in its movement ALFRED WATERS PROCTOR,

into and out of the cabinet, said frames WALDO M. CHAPIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2473823 *Mar 12, 1945Jun 21, 1949Sands Robert EMethod of and apparatus for finishing garments
US2532041 *Aug 11, 1949Nov 28, 1950Anderson Coach CompanyExtendible counter assembly
US2644737 *Jul 21, 1947Jul 7, 1953Davis Harold GWaste receptacle
US4854656 *Apr 26, 1988Aug 8, 1989Keefe Ellen OJewelry storage apparatus
US6595606Mar 1, 2002Jul 22, 2003De La Rue Cash Systems Inc.Cash dispenser with roll-out drawer assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/233, 312/317.1, 312/291, 34/234, 34/664
Cooperative ClassificationF26B9/06