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Publication numberUS1011423 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 12, 1911
Filing dateMar 27, 1908
Publication numberUS 1011423 A, US 1011423A, US-A-1011423, US1011423 A, US1011423A
InventorsOtis Elevator Com- pany
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Belt-drive elevator.
US 1011423 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. L. GALE, s3. BELT DRIVE ELEVATOR.

APPLIUATIOH FILED MAKET, 1908.

Patented Dec. 12, 1911.

iwi/[menses E. L. GALE, Sn.

BELT DRIVE BLEYATOR. APPLICATION FILED 111111.27, 190a.

Patented D60. 12,1911.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

q/vvlmcmca guns :1 [506 E. L. GALE, Sn. BELT DRIVE ELEVATOR.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 21. 1908.

1,01 1,423. Patented Dec. 12, 1911.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 3,

13W 1 name; (June/Mo:

B. L. GALE, Sn. BELT DRIVE ELEVATOR.

APPLIOATIOR FILED MAR. 27, 1908.

1,01 1,423,. Patented Dec. 12, 1911.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

UNITED STATES OFFICE.

ERNEST L. GALE, 513., OF YONKERS, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO OTIS ELEVATOR COM PANY, OF JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

BELT-DRIVE ELEVATOR.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dem 12, 1911.

Application filed March 27, 1908. Serial No. 423,766.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known thatl, Enxits'r L. GALE. Sn, a citizen of the United States, residing at Yonkers. in the county of \Vestchestcr and State of New York. have invented a new and useful Improvement in Belt-Drive Etc vators, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to hoisting mechanism particularly adapted for use in traction elevator systems, although it may have a much more general application.

In the use of present traction elevators, great ditliculty has been experienced on acount of the slipping between the cables and driving pulleys. .The use of flat belts in place of the rouud'stccl cables ordinarily used is unsatisfactory for various reasons. The great strain on the steel cables when the weight of the elevator car and counter "ing advantages not found in the use of either one alone.

Other objects of the invention will appear hereinafter, the novel combinations of' elements being set forth in the appended claims.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is an elevational view, largely diagrammatic, of a traction elevator system embodying my invention, the motor and drive sheaves being located at the bottom of the elevator shaft; Fig. 1" is a detail view showing the gears 7 and 8 in mesh with each otheryFig. 2 is a similar view of a modification in which the motor and drive sheaves are located overhead; Figs. 3 and 4 are respectively a side and rear elevation of a further modification in which the driving sheave is mounted on the motor shaft; and Fig. 5 isayiew similar to Fig. 3, but showing a modification of the traction, belts. Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 2 but showing the form of driving belt employed in Figs. 3 and 42. Fig.

7 shows an arrangement similar to that in Fig. 1 but employing the drive sheave mounted on the motor shaft.

leferring particularly to Fig. 1, the elevator car C is here shown as connected for operation to an electric motor M, supplied with current from the positive and negative mains (designated and respectively) connected to a sourceof current supply. The operation of the motor is controlled from the elevator car by means of a switch S connected by the wires 0., b, a to the controller D which may contain the usual reversing switches, starting resistance, etc. The lnotor in itself forms no part of the present invention and may be replaced by any suitable form of motor or prime mover.

an electromagnetic brake B of a well known form has its magnet winding connected to receive current whenevercurrent is supplied to the motor. The brake magnet, when energized, lifts the brake shoe 1 oil from the brake pulley 52 mounted on the motor shaft 3. and when the brake magnet is dcenergized the spring 4 applies the brake shoe.

The motor shaft. 3 carries right and lefthand worms 5 and 6 which drive respectively the worm gear wheels 7 and 8 secured to the shafts 9 and-10. Keyed to the shafts 9 and 10 are drive pulleys 11 and 12 adaptcd to drive the belt or belts 13. The belts may be made of leather or any other suitable material or composition found best suited for the requirements or conditions found in practice in any particular case. The drive pulleys may be made of wood, metal, fiber, or other material, and may, if desired, be faced with leather or other material to secure proper adhesion between the belts and pulleys. The belt 13 has one end secured at 14, to the bottom of the car and extends downwardly beneath the pulley 12, up over the pulley 11, thence horizontally to the direction sheave 15, and upwardly to the over-balance counterweight 16, to which the other end of the belt is con nee-ted. A steel cable 17 connected at one end to the top of the car, extends over the dircction'sheavs 18 and is connected atits other end to the weight 16. A car coom'rrbalance weight 19, connected to the ca r bv means of a cable 20, is adapted to support the dead weight of the car. The OYLP'lLJ' lot] ance weight 16 may be adjusted to balance the average load carried by the car. A certain amount of tension on the driving belt is necessary to prevent slippin when the during pulleys are at rest, an to secure suffcient tractive friction between the belt and )ulleys when running. The tension on the belt when running will be at least that needed to support the unbalanced load and to overcome inertia and friction of parts, but as this is small compared with the tension on the'counterweight cable the wear and strain on the belts are correspondingly reduced.

Fig. 2 shows an arrangement. in which the motor and driving mechanism are located at the to of the elevator shaft. In this instance tie driving belt 13 is connected to the top of the elevator car, and extends upwardly to the overhead drivin pulleys 11 and 12, to the idler pulley 15 and thence down to the -over-balance counterweight 1G. The tension on the belt 13 is in this case due to the weight 16'.

Fi 3 and 4 show another modification, in w ichthe drive pulley 25 is keyed directly to the motor shaft 3. The driving belt in this case is doubled to form a lurality of belt sections 13 and 13'? exten ing between the car and the over-balance weight 16. The weight 16 is provided with -a pulley 26 which serves toequalize the tension on tlii belt sections 13' and 13 which may be made smaller than when .a single belt is used. These belt sections are superposed, so that only one section is in contact with the drive ulley.

Fig. 5- s ows an arrangement similar to Fig. 3, except that the weight 16" and pulls 26 are re laced by independent weig ts 16" and 16 on the free ends of the belts 13? and 13. The weight 16 constitutes an adjustable over-balance wei ht, and the weight 16 a tension device for the driving belt 13. The frictional drivin contact, however, between the drive pul ey 25 and the belt 13 is -'the combined result of the two weights 16 and 16 as the belts are su erposed. The use of the two so arate be ts 13' and 13 constitutes a safety evice, as in case either belt giveaway, the other operates to In Fig. 6 is shown an arrangement substantially like that of Fig. 2 except that a drivin belt is doubled as in Fig. 3 to form This figure that of Fi 1 except that a drive sheave 25 mounted irectly on'the motor shaft is emplo ed to drive the bolt 13.

arious changes in details of construction and arrangement of parts, other than revent the car from dropping independent y of the drive pulleys 25.

those herein set forth, might be made by those skilled in the art without departing from. the spirit or scope of the/invention, and I wish therefore not to be limited to the exact constructions disclosed.

\Vhat I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is 1 1. In a traction elevator, the combination of a car, a cable and counterweight, a belt connected at one end to the -car, a drive pulley engaging the belt, and a weight at the other end of the belt and supported thereby.

2. In a traction elevator, the combination with a car, of a cable and counterweight, an overhead friction drive pulley, a belt attached to the car and engaging said pulley, and a weight suspended by the belt.

3. In an elevator, the combination of a car, a friction drive element, a plurality of superposed belt sections directed and driven by said drive element, and means for placing tension on the belt sections.

1. In an elevator, the combination with a car, of a cable and counterweight, a plurality of superposed belt sections, means for placing tension on the belt sections, and a drive pulley in contact with one of the belt ections.

5. In a traction elevator, the combination ith a car,'of a plurality of superposed belt sections, a tension device for the belt sections, and friction driving means.

6. In a traction elevator, the combination with a car, of a plurality of superposed belt sections, a tension-device, means for equalizing the tension on the belt sections, and friction drivin means for the belt sections.

'7. Ina traction elevator, the combination of a car, a plurality of belt sections connected to the car, a wei ht suspended by said belt sections, means or equalizin the tension on the belt sections, and frictional belt driving means enga 'ng one of the belt sections, said sections in superposed at the point of engagement of t e sa'id drivmg means.

8. In a traction elevator, the combination with a car, of a plurality of superposed belt sections connected to the car, means for placing tension on the belt sections, and a friction drive pulley engaging one 0f the belt sections. y

In a traction elevator, the combination with a car, of a belt doubled to form two supc rpdsed belt sections and having the free ends connected to the car, an overhead friction drive pulley over which the belt sections pass, an equalizing pulleysuspended in the bend formed by doubling the belt, and a weight supported by said equalizing pulley. 10. In atraction elevator, the combination with a. car, of a counterweight and cable, a plurality .of superposed flat belt sections,

a weight suspended-from said belt sections, means for equalizing the tension on the belt sections; a friction drive pulley engaging one of the belt sections, and a motor to which the pulley is connected.

' ed to the ear,.a plurality of driving members associated with said belt, intermeshing gears having a fixedconnection with said memburs, and means for driving said gears to effect movement of the car. A

123. In an elevator, the ebmbination of a (:u r, intermeshiu Y gears, means to rotate the gears, drive pa leys fixed to and rotating with said gears, a flexible driving member engagin said pulleys, and means to connect said flexible driving member to the car.

14. An elevator comprising in combination a car, intermeshing worm gears, pulleys connected to and rotatable with the gears, a flexible member operated by said pulleys, and means to connect said flexible member to the car.

15. An elevator comprising in combination a car,'dri\'ing pulleys, worm Wheels meshing with each other and connected respectively to the pulleys, worms meshing with said worm wheels, :1 driving shaft carrying said worms, and a flexible member in engagement with the driving pulleys and connected to the car. 4

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification two subscribing witnesses.

- ERNEST l'l. GALE, SR.

\Vitnesses CHAS. M. NISSEN,

ERNEST L. GALE, Jr.

in the presence of

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4193311 *Apr 12, 1976Mar 18, 1980Greifzug Gesellschaft Fur Hebezeugbau M.B.H.Driving pulley mechanism
US4345741 *May 14, 1979Aug 24, 1982Rinio Johannes ADriving pulley mechanism
US5433294 *May 18, 1994Jul 18, 1995Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Geared elevator system
US6256841 *Dec 31, 1998Jul 10, 2001Otis Elevator CompanyWedge clamp type termination for elevator tension member
US6295799Sep 27, 1999Oct 2, 2001Otis Elevator CompanyTension member for an elevator
US6345419Jan 19, 2000Feb 12, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyTermination for flat flexible tension member
US6357085Apr 30, 2001Mar 19, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyWedge clamp type termination for elevator tension member
US6364063 *Jun 22, 1999Apr 2, 2002Kone CorporationElevator rope arrangement
US6401871Feb 26, 1998Jun 11, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyTension member for an elevator
US6419208Apr 1, 1999Jul 16, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyElevator sheave for use with flat ropes
US6484368Jan 11, 2000Nov 26, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyFlexible flat tension member termination device
US6513204Dec 18, 2001Feb 4, 2003Otis Elevator CompanyFlexible flat tension member termination device
US6739433Dec 22, 1998May 25, 2004Otis Elevator CompanyTension member for an elevator
US6742769Jul 1, 2002Jun 1, 2004Otis Elevator CompanyElevator sheave for use with flat ropes
US6860367 *Sep 29, 1998Mar 1, 2005Otis Elevator CompanyElevator system having drive motor located below the elevator car
US6868661Feb 27, 2002Mar 22, 2005Kone CorporationElevator rope arrangement
US7874404 *Sep 29, 1998Jan 25, 2011Otis Elevator CompanyElevator system having drive motor located between elevator car and hoistway sidewall
US7946390 *May 30, 2003May 24, 2011Otis Elevator CompanyTie-down compensation for an elevator system
US8210320 *May 20, 2004Jul 3, 2012Inventio AgElevator with belt-like transmission means, particularly with wedge-ribbed belt, as support means and/or drive means
EP1591403A2 *Feb 26, 1999Nov 2, 2005Otis Elevator CompanyTraction elevator system having multiple machines
EP2492232A1 *Feb 24, 2011Aug 29, 2012Inventio AGTensioning device in a lift assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification187/256, 74/427, 187/264, 187/254
Cooperative ClassificationB66B11/009
European ClassificationB66B11/00R8B