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Publication numberUS1012197 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1911
Filing dateJul 15, 1910
Priority dateJul 15, 1910
Publication numberUS 1012197 A, US 1012197A, US-A-1012197, US1012197 A, US1012197A
InventorsDaniel J Golden
Original AssigneeWalter T Stall, Charles H Dean, Daniel J Golden
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sporting-shoe.
US 1012197 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. J. GOLDEN.

SPORTING SHOE.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 15,1910.

l 1,012, 1 97. Patented Dec.19,1911.

COLUMBIA PLANOGRAPH cO..wAsmNa'raN. n. c.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

DANIEL J. GOLDEN, OF RANDOLPH, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO WALTER T. STALL,

CHARLES I-I. DEAN, AND DANIEL J. GOLDEN, COPARTNERS, ALL OF BROCKTON, MAS- SACHUSETTS.

I SPORTING-SHOE.

Patented Dec. 19, 1911. Serial No. 572,122.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, DANIEL J. GOLDEN, of Randolph, in the county of Norfolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain .new and useful Improvements in Sporting-Shoes, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to shoes such as are worn by base-ball players, the bottom of the shoe being provided with spurs adapted to afford a secure foothold.

The object of the invention is to provide a sporting shoe, the spur-engaging portion or portions of which shall be of suitable strength to afford a proper anchorage for the spurs while the shank portion possesses a desirable degree of flexibility permitting free muscular play of the wearers foot.

.The invention consists in the improvements which I will now proceed to describe and claim.

Of the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specication, Figure 1 represents a bottom plan view of a sporting shoe embodyingmy invention. Fig. 2 represents a section on line 2 2 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 represents a section on line 3 3 of Fig. 2. Fig. 4 represents a section on line 4 4 of Fig. 2. Fig. 5 represents a view similar to a portion of Fig. 2, the heel lift shown in Fig. 2 being omitted.

Similar reference characters indicate the same or similar parts in all the figures.

In the drawings, 12 represents the outer sole of my improved shoe which extends continuously from the toe to the heel.

13 represents a forepart inner sole and 14 a heel-part inner sole, said inner soles being separated from each other by an intermediate space which is bridged by the shank portion of the outer sole. The upper of the shoe includes a vamp portion 15 and a heel or counter portion 16. Said upper has a continuous inwardly turned lower edge 17. The vamp or forepart portion of said edge is interposed between the forepart inner sole 13 and the corresponding portion of the outer sole and is secured thereto by suitable means. As shown by Fig. 2 a welt 18 is secured by inseam stitches 19 to the forepart inner sole and by fair stitches 20 to the corresponding portion of the outer sole. The heel portion of the inturned edge 17 is interposed between and secured to the heel-part inner sole 14 and the corresponding portion of the outer sole, the attaching means here shown being metallic fasteners 21, such as tacks or short nails, the heads of which are seated on the outer surface of the outer sole while their points are clenched uron the inner surface of the heel part inner so e.

The intermediate portions of the inturned edge 17 lie upon the inner surface of the shank portion of the outer sole and are secured thereto by means such as longitudinal rows of stitches 22.

In lasting the shoe the inner soles 13 and 14 are placed upon the bottom of the last and the inturned edge of the upper is secured to the said inner soles by lasting tacks,l

the intermediate portions of the said edge being temporarily secured to the last by additional lasting tacks. The outer sole is then applied and its heel portion is attached to the heel-part inner sole by the fastenings 21. If a welt is employed this is attached to the upper and the forepart inner sole in usual manner prior to the application of the outer sole, the latter being then stitched in the usual manner to the welt. The forward portion of the outer sole may, however, be attached to the upper and the forepart inner sole by a McKay machine in which case the lasted upper and the fore and heel part inner soles will be removed from the last before the attachment of the forward portion of the outer sole to the upper and the forepart inner sole.

After the described attachment of the outer sole to the upper and the fore and heel-part inner soles, the portions of the inturned edge 17 of the upper between the fore and heel-part inner soles are attached independently to the shank portion of the outer sole by the stitches 22, this operation being performed after' the removal of the shoe from the last.

Transverse rows of stitches 23, 24, are preferably formed, the stitches 23 extending through the rear portion of the forepart inner sole.

The heel portion of the outer sole is preferably reinforced by a heel lift 25 which covers the fastenings 21 and may be secured to the outer sole by a row of marginal stitches 26 and by the row of transverse stitches 24.

The shoe thus constructed is relatively thick and stili at the fore and heel parts of its bottom, and has a relatively flexible shank portion formed by the shank portion of the outer sole and by the portions of the inturned edge 17 attached thereto.

The relatively thick fore and heel parts are adapted to support plates Q'Tvattached thereto by rivets 28, and provided with outwardly projecting spurs 29. A sheet metal stitfening plate 30 may be interposed between the forepart inner sole and the corresponding portion of the outer sole, said plate being apertured to receive the rivets 2S. The rivets which pass through the heel lift 25 and the spur plate secured thereby to the heel lift, assist materially in firmly connecting the heelpart inner sole and the heel lift to the heel portion of the outer sole.

The heel lift 25 may be omitted, as shown by Fig. 5, although l do not recommend this.

It will be seen that the described construction affords the desired strength and durability at the fore and heel parts, and a suitable degree of flexibility at the shank part.

It will also be seen that while the described construction of the fore part and heel parts of the shoe bottom including the spur plates 27, and the interposed plate 30, renders said parts practically rigid or inflexible, this rigidity and the attending strength, durability and freedom from liability to slip required in a base ball shoe, is compensated for by the flexibility of the shank portion, which acts as a hinge, flexibly connecting the inflexible fore and heel parts.

In a sporting shoe used by participants in the game of base ball and other athletic contests the greatest possible freedom ofV` upward movement of the heel part of the shoe, relatively to the fore part, is verydesirable, and the foot supporting surface of the bottom of the shoe at the shank portion should be entirely free to be flexed upwardly without obstruction and without being caused to press or bulge upwardly against the bottom of the foot. This is provided for in my improved shoe by the single thickness of the shoe bottom at the shank portion, and by the rows of stitches 22, 23 and 24;, the upper surface of the shank portion of the outer sole being unstiffened and unobstructed between the forepart and heel part. Hence there is nothing in the shoe above the said shank portion to obstruct the upward flexure of the latter, or to press upwardly against the bottom of the foot when the shank portion is upwardly flexed. V

I claim:

A shoe comprising an outer sole extending continuously from the toe to the heel of the shoe, a fore part inner sole, a heel part inner sole separated from the fore part inner sole by a space which is bridged solely by the shank portion of said outer sole, an upper including a vamp portion and a heel portion and provided with a continuous in* turned edge, the vamp portion of said upper being interposed between and secured to the forward portion of the outer sole and the fore part inner sole, the heel portion of the vamp being interposed between and secured to the heel portion of the outer sole and the heel part inner sole, the intermediate portions of said edge being secured independently to the shank portion of the outer sole and forming with the latter' a flexible shank, and transverse stitches uniting the rear edge of the fore part inner sole and the forward edge of the heel part inner sole with the outer sole to prevent creeping of said edges.

In testimony whereof I have aliixed my signature, in presence of two witnesses.

DANIEL J. GOLDEN.

Vitnesses C. F. BROWN, A. lV. HARRISON.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6178667Apr 22, 1999Jan 30, 2001Mizuno CorporationSole of baseball spiked shoe and method of measuring shearing stress distribution of baseball spiked shoe
US6182381 *Nov 4, 1996Feb 6, 2001Mizuno CorporationSole of baseball spiked shoe and method of measuring shearing stress distribution of baseball spiked shoe
US6186000Apr 22, 1999Feb 13, 2001Mizuno CorporationApparatus and method for measuring shearing stress distribution on the sole of a spiked shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/126, 36/43
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/0042