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Publication numberUS1016346 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1912
Filing dateJun 4, 1909
Priority dateJun 4, 1909
Publication numberUS 1016346 A, US 1016346A, US-A-1016346, US1016346 A, US1016346A
InventorsReuel T Markee
Original AssigneeReuel T Markee
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat-conserving apparatus.
US 1016346 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. T; MARKER.

HEAT GONSERVING APPRATUS. APPLIOATION FILED JUNE 4, 1909.

1,01 6,346. Patented Feb. 6, 1912.

3 SHEETS-SHEET l.

INVENTORl wlrlvsssss I BY i ATTORNEY R. T. MARKER. HEAT GONSBRVING APPARATUS. APPLOATION FILED JUNE 4, 1909.

1,016,346. n Patented Feb. 6, 1912.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

vngi' INVENTOR w/'rlvsssss f av /VW/ WSL ATTORNEY R. T. MARKBE. HEAT GONSBRVING APPARATUS. APPLICATION FILED .TUNE 4, 1909.

1,016,346. Petented Feb.6,1912.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

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WTNESSES ATTORNEY UNITED sTATEs PATENT oFFIcE.

BRUEL` T. MARKET., or rHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLATANIA.l

HEAT-CGNSERVING APPARATUS.

To all lwhom, 'it may concern 4,

Be it known that I, REUEL T. MARKEE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city and county of Philadelphia, State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful :Improvements in Heat- Conserving Apparatus, of which the following is a full, clear, and complete disclosure.

This invention relates to that class of receptacles which are provided with an inner chamber insulated from its surroundings in such a way that the temperature of the same is conserved and kept substantially constant for a long period of time. They may, therefore, be used to keep hot articles hot and likewise, to keep cold articles cold. Among such receptacles are included vfireless cookers, refrigerators, including refriglerlttor cars, coolers, vacuum cans and the This invention more particularly relates to that species of receptacles enumerated in which 'a vacuum is mainly relied upon to form the heat insulating medium.

Among the improvements which are hereinafter described may be mentioned the use of a lining'of material such as porcelain. for the inner chamber and the surrounding of the vacuum chamber by a dead air space.

'There are various other improvements disclosed herein, such as in the valve of the vacuum chamber and the means for sealing the same, the manner of strengthening the walls of the device and insulating the same from each other, and the manner of keeping the cover on the inner chamber.

Further improvements involved in this invention, will be carefully pointed out in the following description and specifically referred to in the appended claims,

In the drawings Figure 1 is a vertical section through a vacuum receptacle showing one embodiment of this invention; Fig. 2 is a horizontal cross section on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a plan view of the same with the cover partly broken away; Fig. 4 is a plan view of a refrigerator showing another embodiment of this inventlon; Fig. 5 is ahorizontal cross section through the same; Fig. 6 is a view partly 1n front elevation and partly in vertical section of the same; Fig. 7 .is a horizontal. section through the wall of a large refrigerator such as a refrigerator car or buildlng.

Specicationlof Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 21912.

Application filed June 4,' 1909. Serial No. 500,132.

The vacuum can l, shown in Figs. l, 2 and 3 consists of a double walled inner receptacle 2 and a container 3, completely inclosing the receptacle 1.

The receptacle 2 comprises an inner wall 4, having a bottom port-ion 5 and a side portion 6 and an outer wall 7, having a bottom portion 8 and a side portion 9 parallel respectively to the bottom portion 5 and t-he side portion 6 of the inner wall 4. The side portions 6 and 9 are joined air tight in any suitable manner. In the present instance, the side portion 6 is shown formed with an outwardly projecting per-v pendicular flange 10at its upper end, which is connected to the end of the side portion 9 by soldering or welding.

In order to give greater stability to the inner wall 4, the side portion 6 thereof is extended at the bottom, as shown at 11 to meet the bottom portion 8 of the outer wall 7, thereby forming a rest for the inner wall. Adjacent to the point of contact of the extension 11 with the bottom 8 and on the inner Vside thereof, an annular rib 12 is struck up from the bottom to form a firm support for the extension 11. The latter is also provided with perforations 13 in order not to interrupt the space between the inner wall 4 and the outer wall 7.

As the air is exhausted from the space 14 between the inner wall 4 and the outer wall 7, it has been found desirable to reinforce these walls. For this purpose the circumferential rib 15 is struck outwardly from the inner wall 4 and a similar rib 16 is struck inwardly from'the outer wall l7. In addition to this, bosses 17 may be struck up at various points from these walls and project beyond the ribs 15 and 16. vThese bosses may be struck up on the line of the ribs as shown, or at otherplaces. They are arranged to register with each other and a washer 18 of asbestos or like heat insulating material, may be inserted between their.

inner wall 4, or outer wall 7. In the present embodiment the valve is located in the bottom portion 8 of the outer wall 7.. A hole 23 is provided in the bottom 8 and over this hole is placed a cup-shaped device or boss 24 forming a valve chamber 25. The boss 24 may be made separate from the bottom 8 andr secured thereto in any well known manner, as shown at the top of Fig. 1, or it may be made integral with the same, as shown at the bottom of Fig. 1. At its inner end, it is provided with a hole 26 closed by the ball 27. Various means may be used for permanently closing the valve 22 after the air is exhausted from the space 14. In the present instance? there is shown a plate 30 arranged to slide on the bottom 8, in guides 31. The plate 30 is provided with a hole 32 whichv registers with the hole 23 while the air is being exhausted from the space 14. It 4is then moved soy that theholes 32 and 23 arel out of register with veach other, and the plate is then attached to the bottom, as by soldering.

It has been found that there is a tendency 'for the bottom portions 5 and 8 to come together, both because of the weight of material in the interior of the receptacle pressing down on the bottom 5 and because of pressure applied upwardly on the bottom 8 when the vacuum chamber is being exhausted. These pressures are exerted in addition to the unbalanced pressure of the atmosphere which tends to press these'portions together. In order to obviate this diiculty, a ring 35 may be inserted around the valve 22, between the bottoms 5 and 8; this ring is provided with perforations 36 for providing communication with the remaining portion of the vacuum space 14.`

The receptacle 2 is provided with a cover or stopper 40 and a valve 42, similar except as noted above, to the valve 22. It also has a ring 43 similar to the ring 35, and bosses 45, for the purpose of reinforcing the same. It comprises a portion 46 which fits snugly within the side portion 6 at the top and a surrounding portion 47, which is seated upon the tops of the side-portions 6 an 9, Whereby an air tight connection is formed between the stopper 40 and the receptacle 2.

For the purpose of still further insulating the receptacle 2, itis provided with a lining 44 of refractory material, such as porcelain. This lining is particularly desirable in this connection as it forms a smooth unbroken surface for the receptacle and covers over the indentations formed by the ribs and bosses.

The receptacle 2 is wholly enveloped by the container 3. This container is provided with a rib 55 and bosses -50 on. its bottom and sides whichare struck inwardly and serve to space the receptacle from the container 3,

andthus form a dead air space between the same. If desired, these bosses may be per- Ymanently secured to the outer wall of the 'inner receptacle as by soldering. or gas or electric welding. A cover 51 is hmged atthe top of the container y3 andy is adapted to be locked into positionby the locking lever 52 coperating with the projection or catch 53. At the center ofthe cover 51 there is a downwardly extending boss 54 which bears against the stopper 40 when the cover 51 is in closed position and operates to bindthe stopper 40 tightly in closed position.

The refrigerator 60, shown in Figs. 4 5 and 6, discloses another embodiment of this invention. It comprises a double-wall inner receptacle 61, provided with a vacuum chamber 62, similar in construction to the vacuum can described above. Unlike the vacuum can, it has'two Stoppers 63 and 64 on top,

which are each similar in construction to the stopper 40 and the side door 65, which differs from the Stoppers, in that the outer wall 66 which surrounds the dead air chamber is attached .to the walls forming the vacuum chamber. Another difference that will be noted is that the wall ,of the vacuum chamber adjacent to thev wall 66, is provided V'with bosses struck out on both sides, theinwardly extending bosses operating to reinforce the Walls of the vacuum chamber, and the outwardly extending bosses serving to s ace the wall of the vacuum chamber from t e outer wall 66. The door may be provided with an ordinary latch 67. It will also be noted that the continuity' of the dead air space is interrupted at the side door and between the Stoppers 63 and 64. The top doors 68 and 69 of the container are provided with hinges of the refrigerator 60. The ice chest is provided with a spigot 76 and a drain pipe 77 having a water seal 78 to prevent the access of air to the ice chest.

The walls of the refrigerator have brackets 79 struck outv from the same at suitable points'to provide supports for shelves. It is obvious, however, that any other means might be used for supporting the shelves. A porcelain lining similar to thatshown in the vacuum can may also be used in the refrigerator.

Fig. .7 shows the application of my invention to a section of a wall of a refrigerator car or building. The vacuum chamber 80 is formed of two parallel walls 81 and 82,

which are provided with strengthen-ing ribs A heat 1nsupporting studs 86 which may be T-irons as shown, and are spaced from the outer wall 87 so that a dead air chamber may be formed between the vacuum chamber and the wall 87. The chambers 86 may also be insulated from the outer wall 87 by av layer of mineral wool, or similar material, as shown at 88, and wooden studs 89, may be inserted be tween the ends of thevacuum chambers and the T-irons.

I preferably make my heat conserving apparatus out ofsheet metal or similar material, but I may use different materials in the construction of certain of the parts, such as wood in the outer wall, at the same time retaining the essential elements of this invention.

yIt will be understood that the invention disclosed herein is not limited to the precise details of construction described, but many changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the same.

Having thus described my invention, I claim and desire to protect by Letters Iatent of the United States 1. In an article of the class described, an inclosure forming a vacuum chamber having the walls thereof provided with inwardly extending stiiiening ribs and bosses projecting from said ribs and holding said walls spaced apart.

2. In an article of the class described, an inclosure forming a vacuum chamber having the walls thereof provided with in- Wardly extending stiffening ribs, bosses projecting from said ribs and holding said walls spaced apart and heat insulating material inserted between the ends of said bosses and the contacting portion of the opposite wall.

3. In an article of the class described, an inclosure forming a vacuum chamber having the walls thereof provided with inwardly extending stiifening ribs, bosses projecting from said ribs and holding said walls spaced apart, and washers of heat insulating material concaved to fit on the ends of said bosses inserted between said ends and the contacting part of the opposite wall.

4 In an article of the class described, an inclosure forming a vacuum chamber having the walls thereof provided with inwardly extending stiifening ribs and registering bosses projecting from said ribs and holding said walls spaced apart.

5. In an article of the class described, an inclosure forming a vacuum chamber having the walls thereof provided with inwardly extending stiffening ribs, registering bosses projecting from said ribs and holding said walls spaced apart and heat insulating washers having concaved surfaces to fit on the ends of said bosses inserted between the ends of said registering bosses.

6. In a heat insulating receptacle a double walled receptacle, having the air exhausted from between the walls of the same, a double walled stopper hermetically sealing said receptacle, and a container surrounding said receptacle and spaced apart from the same, said container being provided with a cover having a substantiallv spherical boss for engaging and holding said"A stopper in position when said cover is closed, said stopper and boss on said cover having a minimum degree of contact and said cover inclosing a dead air space adjacent to said stopper and surrounding said boss.

7. In a heat insulating receptacle, a double walled receptacle having the air exhausted from between the walls of the same, a double walled stopper hermetically sealing said receptacle, and a container surrounding said receptacle and spaced apart from the same, said container being provided with a pivoted cover having a boss extending inwardly therefrom for engaging and holding said stopper in closed position when said cover is closed.

8. In a receptacle, an inner vessel and a container surrounding said inner vessel, said container being provided with inwardly projecting bosses for spacing 'apart said vessel and said container, and said bosses being permanently secured to said inner vessel.

9. In an article of the class described, an inclosure forming a vacuum chamber having its walls provided with a port and abushing surrounding said port for holding the walls of said chamber apart. j

10. In an article of the class described, an inclosure forming a vacuum chamber having parallel walls, one of said walls being provided with va port for exhausting said chamber and a ring located in said chamber surrounding said port and bracing said walls apart.

11. In an article of the class described, an inclosure forming a vacuum chamber having parallel walls, one of said walls being provided with a port for exhausting said chamber and a perforated ring located in said chamber surrounding said port, and bracing said walls apart.

12. A temperature conserving device comprising a receptacle provided with double walls inclosing a vacuum, a container surrounding said receptacle and forming a dead air space around the same, and a lining of refractory material for said receptacle.

13. A temperature conserving device comprising a receptacle provided with double walls inclosing a vacuum, an outer wall surrounding said receptacle and forming a.

In Witness whereof, I have `hereunto set my dead arfspace around said receptacle, and a, hand this 26th day of May, A. D., 1909.

closure or said device provided with a. vacuum. chamber and an outer dead air REUEL T' MARKEE chamber, the Walls of said dead air cham- Witnesses: ber contacting, to prevent collapsing, at l ALsToN B. MoUmoN, spaced points only. M. J. WALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2546166 *Jun 4, 1945Mar 27, 1951Pfefferkorn Frederick FFood container
US2550804 *Apr 27, 1946May 1, 1951Gordon James MContainer
US3603107 *Apr 28, 1970Sep 7, 1971Adelbert J ElliottTemperature-control system
US5597086 *Mar 18, 1996Jan 28, 1997King-Shui; TsaiMoistureproof tea container and food thermos
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/592.27, 105/357, 220/203.1
Cooperative ClassificationA47J41/022