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Publication numberUS1017318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 13, 1912
Filing dateJan 3, 1911
Priority dateJan 3, 1911
Publication numberUS 1017318 A, US 1017318A, US-A-1017318, US1017318 A, US1017318A
InventorsOtto George Rieske
Original AssigneeMonitor Drill Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grain-drill.
US 1017318 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0. G. RIBS KB.

GRAIN DRILL.

APPLICATION FILED JAN.3, 1911.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

Patented Feb. 13, 1912.

0. G. RIESKE.

GRAIN DRILL.

APPLIOATION FILED 1111.3, 1911.

1,017,318. Patented Feb. 13, 1912.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

c01--.\nm PLANOURAFH 60-. WASHINGTON, D. c.

0. G. RIESKE.

GRAIN DRILL.

APPLICATION FILED 1111.3, 1911.

Patented Feb. 13, 1912.

INVENTOR 3 8HEETS-SHEET 3.

coutuum PLANOGRAPH CO" WASHINGTON u. C

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

OTTO GEORGE RIESKE, 0F MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA, ASSIGNOR TO THE MONITOR DRILL COMPANY, A OORPORATION OF MINNESOTA.

GRAIN-DRILL.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 13, 1912.

Application filed January 3, 1911. Serial No. 600,554. I

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known .that I, Orro GEORGE RIESKE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Minneapolis, in the county of Hennepin and State of Minnesota, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Grain- Drills, of which the following is a specification.

My present invent-ion relates particularly to grain drills of the general type which include two disks suitably attached to astandard and other mechanism for drawing them through the soil.

This invention is directed more particularly toward the construction of the boot and standard, although, as will presently appear, it is also directed toward certain other features and elements whose construction and operation are particularly influenced by the arrangement of the boot and standard.

In the construct-ion of double disk grain drills provision should be made for holding the disks at a suitable angle with respectto each other, in order to bring them toget-her on their edges at a proper point with respect toother parts of the mechanism, and provision should be made for maintaining them flexibly in contact at such point as they decrease in diameter owing to wear. This has heretofore been accomplished by the provision of a spring pressed hub, or the equivalent, or by means of a resilient standard as is illustrated, for example, in

. my pending application, Serial No. 571,917.

It will be understood that in order to cause a pressure between the two disks at their edges, a suitable force should also be applied to them at some point other than the hubs. In previous constructions with which I am familiar, these additional forces have been so applied to the disks as to greatly increase their friction, thus increasing the work necessary to draw them through the ground and increasing their wear.

One of the objects of the present invention is to so arrange and support the disks with respect to the standard and other parts as to reduce the friction and consequent wear to a minimum.

Another object of the present invention is to form the main elements of the grain drill from the minimum number of parts thus decreasing the cost of manufacture and increasin their stren th and ermanenc a: 2: p

Also and at the same time to so relate the parts that the stresses will be. transmitted from the draw bar to the disks in the most direct manner possible, thus enabling me to secure the necessary strength with a minimum amount of material.

Other objects are to so arrange the parts that the grain will be delivered in the most direct manner at the proper point in the furrow, whether the grain delivery be through a spout of the ordinary construction or through the standard in accordance with one of the features of my invention; to provide an improved support for the inside scrapers, when such are used; to provide a novel form of hub support for the disks; and also to so relate and form the main portions of the frame that they can be made integral and particularly to so relate and form them that they can be suitably made from pressed steel.

Other objects and uses will appear from a detailed description of the invention which consists in the features ofconstruction and combination of parts hereinafter described and claimed.

Referring now to the drawings in Figure 1, I show a side view of my improved grain drill, a portion of the spout being broken away and the members hidden. by the forward disk being shown by means of dotted lines; Fig. 2 shows a View looking toward the rear of the grain drill of the construction shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 shows a modified form of grain drill in which the standard extends down more nearly in a vertical direction and in which the grain delivery is made at a point in advance of the standard in such manner that the latter prevents the grain from striking the disks at a point where they are rising in their rotation. Fig. 1 shows a construction similar to that of Fig. 1 with the exception that the grain delivery is made through the standard; Fig. 5 is a cross section taken on line 55 of Fig. 1 looking upward in the direction of the arrows and showing particularly how the forces which balance the edge pressure of the disks are transmitted into the standard at a point near the hub bearing; Fig. 6 is a bottom view similar to Fig. 5; Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6, showing a modified arrangement of the standard and Fig. 8 is a cross-section taken on the line 88 of Fig. 4, looking in the direction of the arrows.

In the embodiment of my invention, I provide a boot of pressed steel or other suitable material and form a standard on the end thereof opposite to that which is attached to the drawbar. This standard. should preferably be formed integral with the boot, and this is especially desirable when a pressed steel construction is used. By thus forming the standard on the end of the boot, both elements may be pressed from a single piece of metal, thus reducing the cost of manufacture to a minimum and providing a construction of maximum strength, durability, and simplicity. The preferred construction is one in which the standard and boot are of channel shaped cross section. This construction presents the advantages of great stiffness and rigidity combined with the fact that when desired the open side of the standard may be closed in and used as a grain delivery chute. As will be described in one of the modifications the disks are attached to the lower end of the standard and the latter is peculiarly formed so as to support the disks with sufficient resiliency to take up all ordinary wear which will come upon them. formed in a peculiar manner with respect to the disk supports so as to bring a point of contact between the disk and the side of the standard close to the hubs thus reducing friction and wear to a minimum.

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, the boot 8 is arched over from its front portion 9 to its rear portion 10 on an arc conforming in a general way to the curve of the disk. Also the width of the boot is varied from front to rear in a general way to conform to the distance between the disks. The forward portion 9 of the boot is bent at substantially right angles to present an arm 11 to which may be suitably attached a drawbar. I do not concern myself in this application particularly with the form of the drawbar as this forms no essential part of my invention. The rear end of the boot is bent in at substantially right angles to present a standard 12 to the lower end of which the disks 13 and 14 are attached. In the preferred construction a telescopic spout 15 is provided for delivering the grain down into the furrow between the disks although in a modification I shall show that this result may be accomplished by delivering the grain directly through the standard.

Referring now particularly to Figs. 3, 4t. and 5, I will describe the preferred form of attachment of the disks to the standard. There the end portion of each flange of the standard is flattened out to present a bearing member 16 (see Figs. 3 and 1). These flattened parts are then recessed on their outer faces to provide countersunk recesses 17, and a rectangular hole 18 is provided The standard is furthermore near the middle of each recess. A cup shaped hub 19 is rigidly attached to each of the flanges at 16. Each of these hubs is provided with a shouldered portion 20 which sets within the recess 17 and the middle part I of each shouldered portion continues as a square neck 21 of proper size to set snugly within the corresponding hole 18 but of lesser elevation than the thickness of the standard flange. A hole 22 extending through each hub receives a bolt 23 having an enlarged and flattened head 24, a nut 25 serving to draw the hub tightly against the standard flange. Each disk is provided in its center with a hole 26 of proper size to receive the shouldered portion 20 of the corresponding hub. A cap 27 sets down over the flange 28 of the corresponding hub. By making the flange 28 circular it is evident that the disk may rotate on the cup shaped hub, but it cannot draw away from the same by reason of the relative positions of the hub and disk.

By forming the shoulder 20 of the 'hub deep enough a slight space 29 is left between the outer face of the standard flange and the inner face of the disk so that under normal conditions the disk does not rub against the standard at this point and consequently there is no friction between the parts near the hub.

The web of the boot channel is preferably slotted at 30 back a suitable distance beyond the hubs so that the ends of the standard flanges will have a proper amount of resiliency with respect to each other. The parts are so formed that the outer edges of the disks come together substantially at a point 31 with thenecessary amount of pressure. In order to relieve the hubs of a certain amount of twisting force which would otherwise come upon them I provide a bulged portion 32 on each side of the standard a slight distance inward from the hub and of proper elevation to contact the disk, thus resisting the twisting force which comes upon the latter. Under these conditions the only force which the hubs have to overcome is substantially at right angles to the disks, that is, a practically straight inward pull on the central part of each disk. By forming these bulges only a small distance from the hubs the radii at which they contact the disks is short and consequently the distance through which the point of contact on the disk travels during each rotation of the same is small and the amount of energy wasted in friction at this point is thus reduced to a minimum. Also the wear of the disk due to this friction is near its center, where the wear from scraping through the ground is a minimum and where this friction wear can best be afforded. Also the wear which comes upon the flanges of the standard is least objectionable at this point, because the strains on the standard are probably smallest at substantially this point.

The preferred construction of the bearing end of the standard is substantially as shown in Figs. 3-7 inclusive. In this case the flange portions 16 are merely continuations of the flanges of the channel. The end portions 33 of the web, however, extend out to a point substantially in line with the hubs. By carrying the web out in this manner so as to form a long narrow slot 30, the stiffness of the web is preserved, but at the same time, resiliency for the disk supports is provided.

In the preferred construction the grain is delivered down through a spout substantially in the manner illustrated in Fig. 1. This spout forms no feature of my present invention, it being merely a telescopicspout passed down through a suitable hole in the web of the boot. It is desirable, however, that it should be located in such way as to deliver the grain substantially at the point 34, as illustrated in Fig. 1. It will be understood that the forward motion of the grain drill tends to carry the grain forward after it leaves the spout so it will be found that it strikes the bottom of the furrow at a point somewhat in advance of a direct line drawn through the center of the spout.

Then a construction similar to that of Fig. 3 is used, in which the standard is substantially vertical, it is, desirable to bring the spout down close in front of it. It will be understood that if the grain is delivered between the disks at a point where they are descending in their rotation, they will tend to throw the grain down into the furrow, thus insuring more even planting. Therefore, when the construction of Fig. 3 is used the standard in and of itself will serve as a partition or guide-way for preventing the grain from falling backwardly where it might strike the disks in their upward movement, thus interfering with the proper planting. One element of my present invention, however, consists in the fact that when desired, the standard, which is of channel shape, may be used as a medium for delivering the grain. In this case, the open side of the channel would be closed, as illustrated in Fig. 4, by means of a bar 33 of suitable material. The spout from the seed box would then deliver the grain into the upper part of the tube thus formed and the grain would be delivered from the tube at a point near the disk bearings.

In Fig. 3, I show a modified construction in which the standard is more nearly perpendicular than that in Fig. 4. It is understood that this modification is not at all limited to the construction which makes use of a grain delivery in advance of the standard, but that the standard might be used as a inedium of grain delivery, even when the latter is almost perpendicular as in Fig. 3. It is desirable when the standard is nearly perpendicular that the pressure device he applied at a point to the rear of the same as illustrated in Fig. 3, so as to secure the proper balance of forces. -When, however, the standard lies at, a greater angle, as illustrated particularly in Figs. 1 and 4, the pressure device should be attached to a suitable connection 38 at a point forward of the central line of the standard.

In the preferred construction illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 any suitable form of inside scraper 39 may be attached to the web of the standard. The scraper illustrated comprises two wings 40 and 41 pivoted to a common pin 42 and forced apart by means of a spring 43. When the standard is closed over to provide a grain chute, the scraper may be attached to the bar which closes the standard channel, as illustrated in Fig. 4. Outside scrapers 44 of any suitable construction may be attached to the boot 8, the scraper illustrated being that described more particularly in a co-pending application executed by me. In Fig. 7, I show a modified form of standard construction which consists in providing an offset in the same at the points 45 where contact is desired between the standard and the disk. These offsets take the place of the bulges shown in the previous construction and possess in some cases an advantage in reduced cost of manufacture. Examination of the construction shown particularly in Figs. 1, 2, and 4, shows that the stresses are transmitted with great directness from the drawbar through the boot and standard to the disks. This is largely due to the fact that the standard is formed integral with the shoe and also to the fact that the standard lies on a line practically parallel to the resultant of forces necessary to drive the disks through the ground. It will be understood that the forward force on the drawbar is a nearly horizontal one while that of the pressure device is nearly a vertical one, so that their resultant lies substantially along the line of the standard in the construction illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, and 4. Owing to this fact and to the fact that the standard and boot are made from one piece, I am able to produce an extremely light and yet durable and stiff construction, thereby largely reducing the cost of manufacture and improving the wearing qualities of the drill. Furthermore, owing to the fact that the standard is connected to the end of the boot, the main element of the drill can be pressed out of sheet steel or other suitable metal at a greatly reduced cost of manufacture. Owing to the resiliency and elasof my grain drill is formed, other important advantages accrue, to wit, that in case of an excess strain coming on the parts the metal will bend a slight amount without breaking. Thereafter, the grain drill may be straightened out with practically no deterioration.

In previous constructions of pressed steel furrow openers with which I am familiar, as for example, those illustrated in my application for Letters Patent of the United States, Serial Nos. 534,967, 571,917, and 574,477, executed by me on various dates, the standard has always been attached to the boot near the central portion of the latter. Such a construction makes it necessary to join these two members together at this point, thus largely increasing the cost of manufacture besides providing a construction which is comparatively weak and there fore undesirable. In the present case, how ever, I overcome these difficulties by forming the standard on the end of the boot. This results in reduced cost of manufacture, increased stitfness and durability, and a better arrangement of the parts for transmitting the necessary forces to the disks, as has been heretofore pointed out, and it results in other advantages. I wish it to be distinctly understood also that in this construction, in which the standard is formed on the end of the boot, pressed steel may be used to very great advantage, and the parts may be in tegrally formed.

I claim:

1. In a grain drill, the combination of a channel-shaped member, arched in its forward portion to provide a boot and down wardly extending in its rear portion to provide a standard, and a pair of co-acting disks rotatably mounted on the lower end of the standard.

2. In a grain drill, the combination of a channel-shaped member of resilient material, arched in its central portion to provide a boot, forwardly extending in its forward portion to provide a drawbar attachment, and downwardly extending in its rear portion to provide a standard, and a pair of coacting disks rotatably mounted on the lower end of the standard.

3. In a grain drill, the combination of a channel-shaped member, arched in its forward portion to provide a boot and down wardly extending in its rear portion to provide a standard, a pair of disks mounted on the lower end of the standard, and means for maintaining their edges in contact at a suitable point with respect to the boot.

a. In a grain drill, the combination of a member of channel-shaped cross section and arched upwardly and rearwardly to provide a boot, and then extending downwardly in its rear portion to provide a standard, and a disk suitably mounted on the lower end of the standard, the flanges of that portion of the channel which constitutes the boot extending away from the disk, and the flanges of that portion of the channel which con stitutes the standard extending rearwardly.

5. In a grain drill, the combination of a member of channel -shaped cross section arched upwardly and rearwardly in its forward portion to provide a boot and extending downwardly in its rear portion to provide a standard, and a disk suitably mounted on the lower end of the standard, the flanges of that portion of the channel which constitutes the boot extending outwardly from the disk, and the flanges of that portion of the channel which constitutes the standard extending rearwardly, and the flanges being of suitable depth and of material having such resiliency that obstructions cause the standard to flex slightly, whereby the disk is enabled to ride over such obstructions.

6. In a grain drill, the combination of a member of channel-shaped cross section and arched upwardly and rearwardly in its forward portion to provide a boot and extending downwardly in its rear portion to provide a standard, and a pair of disks suitably mounted on the lower end of the standard, the flanges of that portion of the channel which comprises the boot extending outwardly away from the disks, and the flanges of that portion of the channel which comprises the standard extending rearwardly, and the web portion of the lower end of the standard being suitably formed to provide resilient mountings for the disks.

7. In a grain drill, the combination of a channel-shaped member, having its rear portion suitably formed to present a standard, and having the flanges thereof rearwardly extending, the web portion of the lower end of the standard being suitably cut away, disk bearings suitably secured to the flanges of said portion of the standard, and a disk suitably mounted on each hearing, each flange of the standard being suitably formcd at a point adjacent the hearing to provide a support for the inner face of the corresponding disk, and the disk bearings being suitably positioned With respect to said disk face supports to bring the edges of the disk into contact at a suitable point with respect to the standard.

8. In a grain drill, the combination of a channel-shaped member having its rear portion suitably formed to present a standard, and having the flanges of the channel of the standard rearwardly extending, and having the web portion of the lower end of the standard channel cut away and the lower ends of the flanges of the channel suitably member of channel-shaped cross section hav ing its rear portion downwardly extending in the form of a standard, and having the flanges of the channel of said portion rearwardly extending, and having the web portion of the lower end of said standard cut away to free the flanges in said portion, and having said flanges outwardly bulged at a point above the lower ends of the flanges, with a disk suitably mounted on the lower end of each flange, and having its inner face in contact with the corresponding bulge, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.

10. In a grain drill, the combination of a body member arched upwardly and rearwardly in its forward portion to provide a boot and extending downwardly in its rearward portion to provide a standard, and a pair of disks suitably mounted on the lower end of the standard, said lower end of the standard being suitably formed to provide resilient mountings for the disk.

11. In a grain drill, the combination of a body member having its rear portion suitably formed to present a standard of channel-shaped cross-section and having the flanges thereof rearwardly extending, the web portion of the lower end of the standard being suitably cut away, disk bearings suitably secured to the flanges of said portion of the standard and a disk suitably mounted on each bearing, each flange of the standard being suitably formed at a point adjacent the bearing to provide a support for the inner face of the corresponding disk, and the disk bearings being suitably positioned with respect to said disk face supports to bring the edges of the disks into contact at a suitable point with respect to the standard.

OTTO GEORGE RIESKE.

Witnesses:

BERNIGE G. WHEELER, HARRY D. KILGORE.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, I). G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4736803 *Sep 16, 1986Apr 12, 1988J. I. Case CompanySelf-adjusting scrapers for double disk openers
US7290620Feb 27, 2004Nov 6, 2007Cnh America LlcDisk blade scrapers for tillage apparatus
US7753134 *Jul 31, 2009Jul 13, 2010Cnh America LlcCoulter assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification172/575, 172/566
Cooperative ClassificationA01B13/00