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Publication numberUS1027887 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1912
Filing dateMay 11, 1911
Priority dateMay 11, 1911
Publication numberUS 1027887 A, US 1027887A, US-A-1027887, US1027887 A, US1027887A
InventorsHerbert W Owen
Original AssigneeDraper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loose-warp take-up.
US 1027887 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. W. OWEN. LOOSE WARP TAKE-UP. ABPLIOATION FILED MAY 11, 1911.

Patented May 28, 1912.

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UNITED STATES PATENT onnien.

HERBERT W. OWEN, OF DOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE, ASSIGNOR TO DRAPER COMPANY, OF HOPEDALE, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF MAINE.

LOOSE-WARP TAKE-UP.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented May 28,1912.

To all whom it may. concern..-

Be it known that I, HERBERT W. OWEN, of Dover, in the county .of Strafiord and State of New Hampshire, have invented a Loose- Warp Take-Up, (Case B,) of which the fol lowing is a specification.

It frequently occurs that more warp threads are wound on the warp beam of a loom than are required in weaving the intended fabric. This surplus of warp threads on the warp beam is often intentional in order that there shall certainly be enough warp threads available for the fabric. The result of such surplus of extra warp threads is that they are apt to get among the warp threads which are being woven into the fabric and consequently warp breakage occurs and defects in the fabric are caused. Heretofore the looking after of these loose warps has been a source of annoyance and has required frequent attention on the part of the weaver.

The purpose of the present invention is to provide an automatic take-up for these loose warp threads. It is important in connection with such a loose warp take-up that it should be equally etficient irrespective of the location of the loose warp threads on the warp beam and irrespective of the varying rates of the feed of the warp due to differing numbers of picks in a given length of the fabric. It is likewise important that the mechanism should be simple and should require minimum attention and no adjustment on account of varying numbers of picks. The loose warp take up constituting the present invention carries out these objects.

It is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1, is a vertical longitudinal section of so much of a loom as is necessary for an understanding of the present invention, the loom being equipped with the new takeup. Fig. 2, is a rear view of the take-up.

A, is a portion of the framework of the loom; B, is the warp beam C, C, are the harnesses, a simple harness motion being shown comprising only twovertically reciprocating harnesses; and D, D, are the lease rods. The illustrated warp threads 65, a, are those which are utilized in the weaving and which enter the finished fabric. Extra surplus or loose warp threads are shown at 6,

three such loose warps being indicated in Fig. 2. These loose warps pass from the warp beam B, over the usual whip roll R, and thence upwardly and forwardy to the loose warp take-up. This take-up includes a drum E, upon which the loose warps Z), are wound. This drum loosely rotates upon an axle F, which extends horizontally across the loom and parallel with the warp beam. The take-up drum E, can he slid lengthwise of the axle F, so that it be adjusted crosswise of the warp to "any desired position opposite the warp beam, so that the loose warp threads may pass from the warp beam to the take-up through the shortest possible path. Several of the take-up drums can be mounted on the same axle. The axle F, is parallel with the warp beam and it has spindles c, at its opposite ends which rest in open bearings (Z, in brackets G, secured to the loom frame A. Accordingly, the axle can be readily removed at any time from the loom and the drum E, can be then slipped endwise on from the axle for the purpose of removing therefrom the warp threads wound thereon when the drum is full. An empty drum can be at once placed on the axle and the axle replaced on the loom, so that no cessation in the operation of the loom is necessary when a full take-up drum is removed and an empty one put in its place. For rotating the take-up drum it is equipped with a grooved pulley H, fast thereon with which cooperates a flexible driver I. This driver at one end is connected with the rear harness C. It can be readily connected with the harness at any part of the length thereof, so that the driver can cooperate with the drum wherever the drum may be located on the axle F. This driver I, is a band or cord passing over the grooved pulley H, and at its free end a weight J is attached to it.

When the rear harness, to which the driver I, is attached, rises, the weight J, descends, thereby rotating the drum backwardly in a direction to unwind the loose warps. When the rear harness descends it draws upon the driver I, thereby causing the take-up drum to rotate forwardly and hence to wind up the loose warps. If the connection between the driver I, and the drum pulley H, were a tight and uniform one, the drum would simply be oscillated back and forth to equal extents and there would be no winding up of the loose warps. The driving arrangement shown, however, affords a loose drive which is more effective to advance the take-up drumthan to reverse it.

Then the rear harness starts on its ascent, it moves more quickly than does the weight J, dropping by gravity, with the result that the driver I, is slackened during the first portion of the ascent of the rear harness, thereby freeing the pulley H, of the friction of the driver to a substantial extent; and the full frictional effect of the weighted driver as it drops is not realized until the rear harness has ascended part way. The consequence is that the down stroke of the rear harness is more effective in rotating the take-up drum than its Lip-stroke and hence the take-up drum rotates forwardly to a greater extent than it rotates rearwardly. Therefore the loose warps are wound upon the take-up drum. The loose drive of the take-up drum is further important because the driver can slip when the loose warps are drawn taut and hence there is no danger of breaking the loose warps even though there is but a single one being wound on the take-up. Another merit of the loose drive is that it is equally eflicient no matter how fast or how slowly the fabric is advanced as the weaving progresses and, consequently, no adjustment of the loose thread take-up is required. This loose drive constitutes a slipping friction drive which slips sufficiently to avoid breaking the warp threads while effectively winding them up irrespective of their accumulation on the drum and the varying feed of the cloth.

The surplus warp threads on the warp beam which are wound up by the rotary take-up are not governed by the weaving instrumentalities (namely, the harnesses, the cloth take-up and their cooperating devices) nor do they enter the fabric woven by the loom; and, accordingly, the take-up for the surplus loose warp threads is an element separate from the warp beam and the cloth take-up, and it is important that it should perform its oflice of taking care of the surplus warp threads during the normal progress of the weaving, and hence it is power impelled and automatic in its action.

I claim 1. A loom having, in combination, a warp-beam; an axle removably mounted on the loom above the warp and parallel with the warp-beam; a take-up drum for the surplus warp-threads on the warp-beam which do not enter into the fabric woven on the loom, said drum being independent of the cloth take-up, and being slidingly and rota tively mounted on said axle; and means for rotating said take-up drum.

'2. A loom having, in combination, a warp-beam; an axle mounted on the loom parallel with the warp-beam; a take-up drum for the surplus warpthreads' on the warp-beam which do not enter into the fabric woven on the loom, said drum being independent of the cloth take-up, and being sliding'ly and rotatively mounted on said axle; and means for rotating said take-up drum.

3. A loom having, in combination, a warpbeam; an axle removably mounted on the loom; a take-up drum for the surplus warp-threads on the warp-beam which do not enter into the fabric woven on the loom, said drum being independent of the cloth take-up, and being slidingly and rotatively mounted on said axle; and means for rotating said take-up drum.

4. A loom having, in combination, a warp-beam; a take-up for the surplus warpthreads on the warp-beam which do not enter into the fabric woven on the loom, said take-up being'independent of the cloth takeup, and being adjustable crosswise of the warp; and means for automatically moving said take-up.

5. A loom having a warp-beam and weaving instrumentalities, in combination with a take-up for the surplus warp-threads on the warp-beam which do not enter into the fabric woven on the loom, said take-up being independent of the cloth take-up, and being adjustable crosswise of the warp; and means for moving said take-up.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto signed my name in the presence of two sub scribing witnesses.

HERBERT W. OWEN.

Witnesses DWIGHT HALL, ALMrE M. JENNEss.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4691742 *Dec 31, 1985Sep 8, 1987Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.Surplus warp yarn treating device of loom
US5421372 *Jan 21, 1994Jun 6, 1995Am-Mark Label, Inc.Method and apparatus for weaving articles on a loom in a plurality of widths
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/97
Cooperative ClassificationD03D49/06