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Publication numberUS1029627 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1912
Filing dateApr 5, 1909
Priority dateApr 5, 1909
Publication numberUS 1029627 A, US 1029627A, US-A-1029627, US1029627 A, US1029627A
InventorsCharles O Pearson
Original AssigneeCharles O Pearson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Traction-elevator.
US 1029627 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. 0. PEARSON. TRACTION ELEVATOR. APPLICATION I'ILED APR. 5, 1909.

1,029,627, Patented June 18, 1912.

2 BHEETB-SHEET 1.

G. O. PEARSON.

TRACTION ELEVATOR; APPLICATION FILED APR. 5, 1909.

' Patented June 18, 1912.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

' WITNESSES:

ATTORNEY CHARLES O. PEARSON, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

TRACTION-ELEVATOR.

oaacer.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 18, 1912.

AppIication filed April 5, 1909. Serial No. 487,866.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, CHARLES O. PEARSON, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the borough of Brooklyn, in the county of Kings, city and State of New York, United States of America, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Traction-Elevators, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to traction elevators and its object is to improve upon elevators of this type, and to provide a novel and eiii cient apparatus for driving them.

I will describe my invention in the following specification and point out the novel features thereof in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of the driving mechanism and some of its connected parts, and also shows a wiring diagram with certain electrical connections which may be used in carrying out my invention. Fig. 2 is a side elevation of one of the driving sheaves with a part broken away to show its construction. Fig. 3 is a side elevation of a modified arrangement of some of the parts shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is an end elevation of a portion of the driving mechanism together. with a car and counterweight and their connecting driving strips. Fig. 5 is an end elevation of one of the electromagnetic brakes used with this apparatus. In Fig. 6 is shown the manner in which these parts may be arranged when it is desired to have the driving machinery at a point below the top of the shaft.

Like characters of reference designate corresponding parts in all of the figures.

10 designate an elevator-car and 11 its counterweight. These are connected together by a series of flat strips 12, 13 and 14 of flexible metal. These strips are to be carried over driving sheaves which will be more fully described hereinafter and affixed to the car and to the counterweight in any desired manner.

Referring to Fig. 1, 20' is abase-plate upon which the various parts of the driving machinery may be mounted. 21 is an electric motor mounted upon this base. 22 is its shaft, and 23 is a driving sheave upon the outer end of the shaft, which driving sheave is shown somewhat in detail in Fig. 2. In this figure it may be seen that it has a flat driving surface which may, if desired. be covered with a facing 24 of leather or other suitable material. At either side of this surface are flanges 25, the distance between which is somewhat greater than the width of the strips which run between them. is a brake-pulley keyed to the shaft 22. 31 and 32 are brake levers which are pivoted at 33 and 34 and carry suitable brake-shoes. These shoes are arranged to be forced against the surface of the pulley 30 by means of a compression spring 35 acting upon a rod 36, one end of which is connected with the free ends of brake levers 31 and 32 by toggle links 37 38 designates a solenoid to the core of which the rod36 is connected. This solenoid is so arranged that when it is energized it will draw in its core against the action of spring 35, and, through the mechanical connections above pointed out, will release the brake-shoes. The other motors are designated in Fig. 1 by the numerals 26 and 28 and their shafts by 27 and 29. As the various parts of these motors and their driving sheaves and brake mechanisms are similar to those above pointed out, further description of them is not neces sary.

I will now trace the circuits which are shown in the wiring diagram as a simple manner of connecting the various parts of the hoisting apparatus and at the same time will describe the operation of this invention.

and designate mains from a suitablesource of electrical supply. These, after passing through a switch 40, are connected with certain stationary contacts of an electromagnetically actuated reversing switch, the actuating magnets or solenoids of which are designated by 41 and 42. is a manually operated controlling switch which is preferably located in the car 10. This switch comprises a movable contact lever 51 which is connected with the positive main by a conductor 52. 53 is a stationary contact in the controlling switch which is connected. by a conductor 54 with one end of the winding of solenoid 41, the other end. of which is connected at 55 with the negative main. When an operator moves the contact lever 51 to the. left, he therefore closes a circuit through solenoid 41, which then raises certain movable contacts. These, cooperating with some of the stationary contacts of the reversing switch which have been before mentioned, cause the positive main to be connected through conductor 43 and an automatic rheostat and conductor 44 with one of the armature terminals of each of the motors, and at the same time will cause the negative main to be connected with the other armature terminals of each motor through a conductor 45. 46 is a con ductor from the negative main to one of the terminals of the shunt field winding of each of the motors and to one of the terminals of each of the brake solenoids. When the lefthand portion of the reversing switch has been actuated it will cause circuits to be completed from the positive main through conductor 47, the contacts of the reversing switch, and conductor 48 through all of the motor shunt fields and through all of the brake solenoids. Now the brakes will be released and the motors will rotate slowly in one direction. This rotation of the motors will be imparted to the driving sheaves, and through the flat metallic strips will cause the car and counterweight to be driven in opposite directions. It is to be noted that there is no mechanical connection between the shafts of the different motors except that through the driving strips. An inclependent driving force will therefore be exerted upon each of these strips and the relative speeds of the motors will be automatically adjusted without putting undue strains upon the hoisting apparatus or the driving strips. The driving sheaves may be of the same diameter or of diiferent sizes as will be pointed out hereinafter, and the normal speed of the motors may be made to be somewhat closely proportional to the desired peripheral speed of the sheaves so as to minimize the amount of this self adjustment of their relative speeds. A further movement of the controlling switch lever 51 to the left will bring it onto a stationary contact 56 which will close a circuit through a conductor 57 and a solenoid 61 of the auto matic rheostat back to the negative main at- 55. This solenoid 61 is arranged to move a contact lever 62 over a plurality of stationary segments 63 to which resistance coils 64 are connected to cut this resistance out of the motor armatures. In order to make this 7 action gradual, a dashpot 65 is connected with the contact arm. This will cause a smooth and gradual acceleration of the motors and of the driven car.

It is evident that these operations may be reversed as the operator may move the switch-lever back partway to cut ofi solenoid 61 so that resistance coils 64 may be again put into series with the motor armatures to cause them to run slowly or he may move the switch-lever back to its central position when the current will be cut ofi from the motors and the brakes to bring the apparatus to rest. A movement of the switch-lever 51 to the right will bring it -first onto stationary contact 58 which is connected through conductor 59 with sole noid 4:2 to actuate the right-hand portion 1 modate strips such as 12 and 12 Ob- H viously, this number of driving surfaces may be increased if desired. I do not mean, by describing this method, that I limit myself to any specific number of motors, as it is apparent that any desired number of motors may be used in this combination.

In Fig. 1 the driving sheaves are shown as being of equal diameters. The lower ones could obviously be made smaller than those above them if it is desired to have the strips entirely independent of each other. Such an arrangement is shown in Fig. 1. In Fig. 6, however, the driving sheaves which are nearer the car are made larger so that the various strips overlap one another. In this figure the driving strips 12, 13 and 14 are aflixed at 15 to ropes or cables 16 which run over a sheave 17 and to the car 10 to which they are suitably attached,

and, in a similar manner, at 18 to cables 19 which run to the counterweight.

This invention makes possible the employment of a plurality of driving strips, each of which is driven by a wide friction surface which may be covered with a comparatively soft facing, and which surfaces not only efficiently drive the car while they are in motion, but effectively and safely hold it while they are at rest. These features are important in the particular types of tors shown, but obviously the same invention may be used in conjunction with other forms of elevators and even with other kind of apparatus. Furthermore, the several eleva- Y prlme movers rotate independently of each other and readily adjust themselves to the required relative speeds without putting any undue strains upon the hoisting mechanism, nor subjecting the driving strips to abnormal stresses.

What I claim is 1. A driven member, a plurality of fiat over-lapping metallic strips afiixed thereto, and separate rotary driving means for each of the strips.

2. A driven member, a plurality of flat over-lapping metallic strips afiixed thereto, a rotary driving sheave for each of said strips and an independent motor for each sheave.

'3. A driven member, a plurality of flat over-lapping metallic strips affixed thereto, a plurality of motors and a' plurality of rotary sheaves independently driven by said motors, said sheaves being arranged to drive said strips.

4. A driven member, a plurality of overlapping fiat metallic strips affixed thereto, a plurality of motors, a plurality of sheaves independently driven by said motors, and a facing for said sheaves of yieldable material, each of said sheaves being arranged to drive one or more of said strips.

5. A driven member, a plurality of overlapping flat metallic strips affixed thereto, a plurality of driving sheaves, a separate electric motor for each of said sheaves, said motors being mechanically connected by said strips, and electrical connections between the motors.

6. In a traction elevator, a car, a plurality of overlapping flat metallic strips connected therewith, a plurality of rotatable members having driving surfaces, each arranged to drive one of said strips, and independent means for rotating said members.

7 In a traction elevator, a car, a counterweight, a plurality of flat metallic strips connecting the car and the counterweight, and separate driving means for each of the strips.

8. In a traction elevator, a car, a counterweight, a plurality of flat metallic strips connecting the car and the counterweight, a plurality of rotatable members having driving surfaces, each arranged to drive one of said strips, and independent means for r0- tating said members.

9. In a traction elevator, a car, a plurality of overlapping flat metallic strips connected therewith, a plurality of sheaves having cylindrical driving surfaces, each of which surfaces cooperates with one of the strips, and a motor for each sheave.

10. In a traction elevator, a car, a counterweight, a plurality of fiat metallic strips between the car and the counterweight, a plurality of sheaves having cylindrical driving surfaces, each of which surfaces cooperates with one of the strips, and an electric motor for each sheave.

11. In a traction elevator, a car, a counterweight, a plurality of fiat metallic strips between the car and the counterweight, a plurality of sheaves having cylindrical surfaces, leather facings affixed to said surfaces, each of which surfaces cooperates with one of the strips, an independent electric motor for each sheave, said motors being mechanically connected through said strips, and electrical connections between said motors.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

CHARLES O. PEARSON.

Witnesses EDITH BEBEE, ELLA 'IUci-I.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4108280 *Dec 27, 1976Aug 22, 1978Canadian General Electric Company, Ltd.Plural rope friction hoist with braking apparatus
US6397974 *Oct 9, 1998Jun 4, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyTraction elevator system using flexible, flat rope and a permanent magnet machine
US7806238Jul 12, 2005Oct 5, 2010Inventio AgElevator and pulley assembly for use in an elevator
DE19948946A1 *Oct 11, 1999Apr 19, 2001Wittur AgAn elevator drive system is compact and contained in the elevator shaft having a multibelt drive wheel and a flat, synthetic lifting cable.
WO2006005215A2 *Jul 12, 2005Jan 19, 2006Inventio AgLift and pulley assembly for use in a lift
Classifications
U.S. Classification187/258
Cooperative ClassificationB66B11/08