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Publication numberUS1032794 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1912
Filing dateMay 13, 1910
Priority dateMay 13, 1910
Publication numberUS 1032794 A, US 1032794A, US-A-1032794, US1032794 A, US1032794A
InventorsFranz Emil Wolf
Original AssigneeFranz Emil Wolf
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exhaust-silencer for internal-combustion engines.
US 1032794 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. E. WOLF. EXHAUST SILENGER FOE INTERNAL GOMBUSTIION ENGINES.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 13, 1910.

1,0323% 1 Patentd Jul 16, 1912."

To all whom it'may concern:

FRANZ'EMIL WOLF, OF NOWAW Umm serene rnrnivr torsion.-

ES, NEAR ro'rsnarr, GERMANY.

EXHAUST-SILENCER' FOR INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

rateneeeaeiy is, rare.

Application filed. May 13, 1910. Serial No. 561,053.

exhaust silencers for internal combustion engines and its. object is to provide a silencer which acts without obstructing the "exhaustand reducing the efiiciency of the engines, as is the case with silencers wherein the passage is narrowed and the direction of flow of the gases reversed. 7

With this object in View my invention consists in conducting the exhaust gases through a passage or passages formed by a series of spaced disks, arranged axially behind each other, and allowing the gases to radially traverse the space or spaces between said disks so that they can expand and are simultaneously subjected to friction and cooling on the surfaces of the disks. Such friction of the gases on the disksmay be produced in various ways. For example the disks may be located in such proximity to each other that suflicient friction is produced, or the gases may be forced to'travel on curved paths, so that they are thrown against the walls when being. deflected.

Obviously both means may-be combined in r a single apparatus.

indicate corresponding parts.

For the purpose of explaining the invention several examples'embodying the same have been. shown in the accompanying drawing in which the same letters .of reference have been used in all the views to' Insaid drawing Figure 1, is a vertical section of an exhaust-pipe and the silencer connected therewith, Fig. 2, is across-see tion of the silencer taken on the, line 22 of Fig. 1,Figs.' 3'to 5, are vertical sections similar to that shown in Fig. 1 and, 1llus-" trating modifications of thesilencer, and Fig. 6, is a section of a part, of a silencer which is similar in construction to that shown in Fig. 5. i I

Referring to' the example illustrated 1n Figs. 1 and 2, my improvedsilencer consists of a plurality of disks (1 placed coaxlally in series, and provided, with the exception of the outermost one ad, with cen .tral openings 6, the diameters of which are equal to thatof the exhaust pipe 0. The first disk is jointed to the exhaust pipe 0 by means of a union 0?; the last disk 0. forms av closure in the direction of flow of the gases. The disks are spaced apart by jspacing sleeves f, ofbolts '6, so that they inclose annular flat intermediate spaces, through which the gases flow radially outward as indicated by the arrows.' During this outward flow the gases are enabled to expand, and are at the same time cooled by contact with the disks, so that they pass. out at the periphery of the device comparatively silen ,The device is differentiated from previously known silencers by the fact that there is no reduction of cross section of the pas-' sage for the exhaust gases, but a progressive increase of cross section, whereby backpressure on the power cylinders of the engine is obviated. The silencer. is comparatively very small, and consequently of light weight,- and cheap. The subdivision of the gases prevents silencer-explosions in case of failure of ignition. The distance of the disks (1 from each other is sufliciently small to produce the friction required for slowing but connected by means down the speed of the, gases, and the diameter ofthe disks is such that thegases escape from the silencer almost noiseless.

To prevent dispersion of the exhaust gases at the periphery of the device, the disks a may be curved inward at their edges a as shown in Fig. 3, so that the gases are deflected toward thecenter again. The ex-' haust gases may. then pass into anotherdischarge conduit. The re-narrowing of the passage in this form of the device has no disadvantageous elfects on the'working, in-

.asmuch as the gases are cooled, before they pass out of the spaces between the disks, and

are consequently of smaller volume.

The construction shown in Fig.3 also embodies a second means for producing frictionof the gases on the surfaces of the disks a, the gases, being brought in close contact with the diskswhen being deflected on the curved portion a of thes me.

7 In Fig. 4: the gas-passages are undulated, by reason of corrugation of the disks a a Such corrugation strengthens the disks and increases the contact-surface for the gases,

and friction of the same on the disks. Sinuosity of the gas-passages can also be obtained by providing the disks with ribs concentrically or otherwise disposed. Examples of this construction are shown in Figs. 5 and 6, with ribs of wedge-shaped crosssection. In Fig. 5 the disks (0 and a are jointed together by means of bolts 0 enabling them to be adjusted relatively to each other, to increase or reduce the gas-passages according to the power of themotor and the rate of exhaust. The same means enables the device to be easily cleaned, for which purpose the disks may be wholly disconnected.

In the example shown in Fig. 5, the

grooves formed between successive ribs 9 and h are rounded at their bottoms, wlnle' in the modification shown in Fig. 6 the said grooves are formed with angular side faces.

I claim: 1. A mufiier consisting of a plurality of plates fastened together in spaced relation, one of the outer plates of said muffler being formed with an inlet opening for the admission of the gases and the other of its outer plates being closed to compel the gases to flow outwardly over and between opposed faces of the plates; each intermediate plate being annular and havin an opening the size of which is substantially the same as that of said inlet dpening; the interval which separates the faces between which flow the gases being-at the outer edge portions of the plates at least as great as the interval between the'same faces at the central portions of the plates, whereby throttling of the gases at their discharge from the mufller is avoided and friction is produced between the gases and the faces between which the gases flow; said faces being formed with a series of alternate ribs and grooves for the purpose herein set forth.

2. A muffler consisting of a plurality of plates fastened together in spaced relation; one of the outer plates of said mufiler being formed with an inlet opening for the admission of the gases and the other of its outer plates being closed to compel the gases to flow outwardly over and between opposed.

faces of-the plates; each intermediate plate being annular and having an opening the size of which, is substantially the same as that of said inlet opening; the interval which separates the faces between which flow the gases being at the outer edge portions of the plates at least as great as the interval between the same faces at the central port-ions of the plates, whereby throttling of the gases at their discharge from the muffler is avoided and friction is produced between the gases and the faces between which the gases fiow.

In testimony whereof I afliX my signature, in presence of two witnesses.

,HENRY HAsPER,

WOLDEMAR HAUr'r.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2618355 *Aug 5, 1948Nov 18, 1952Maremont Automotive Products IMuffler with single outlet opening elongated in a direction parallel to the axis of the inlet opening
US2658580 *Sep 26, 1949Nov 10, 1953Rech S Tech Et D Expl S Ind SoSilencer for internal-combustion engines
US2665760 *May 31, 1950Jan 12, 1954Hulsey James FPressure dissipating manifold for bringing in wells
US2773553 *Feb 13, 1953Dec 11, 1956Maschf Augsburg Nuernberg AgMuffler
US2954839 *Nov 6, 1958Oct 4, 1960Stephen J GibelMuffler
US4132159 *Feb 19, 1975Jan 2, 1979Luftkonditionering AbNoiseless air flow device and method
USRE31105 *Aug 30, 1978Dec 21, 1982 Controlled pressure drop valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification181/264
Cooperative ClassificationF01N1/08