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Publication numberUS1035230 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1912
Filing dateOct 24, 1911
Publication numberUS 1035230 A, US 1035230A, US-A-1035230, US1035230 A, US1035230A
InventorsPearson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Traction-elevator.
US 1035230 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

6.0.PEARSON.

TRACTION ELEVATOR.

APPLIOATION FILED 00T.24,191L

1935,2369 Patentfi-mg". 13, 1912.

INVENTOR z zm; 5%W% ATTORNEYS I CHARLES O. PEARSON, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

TnAorIoN-nLnvATon.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed: October 24, 1911. SerialNo. 656,465.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, CHARLES O. PEARSON,

.a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the borough of Brooklyn, in the county of- Kings, city and State of New York, United States of 'America, have in vented certain new and useful Improvements in Traction-Elevators, of which the following is a specification,

My invention relates to traction elevators and its object is to improve upon elevators of this type, and to provide a simple, efiicient and safe apparatus.

I will describe my invention in the following specification and point out the novel features thereof in the appended claims.

Referring tofthe drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation, more or less diagrammatic, of an elevator. car and counterweight, and apart'ofthe driving mechanism therefor made according to my invention. Fig. 2 is a view, at right angles to that of Fig. 1, of certain parts of the same apparatus but drawn on a larger scale. In Fig. 3 a detail of construction is shown. This figure is a sectional side elevation of the driving sheave and someof its cooperating parts, the section being taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2. Like characters of reference designate corresponding parts in all of the figures. 10 designates an elevator car, and 11 its counterweight. These are connected by one or mo' flat metallic strips 12 which run up over a driving sheave 13. A plurality of these-strips are preferably provided, placed side by side upon the driving sheave, which may be provided, as shown, with a separate peripheral channel for each of the strips. The faces of these channels may be leatherfaced, but I prefer to interpose between=the sheave and each of the strips an endless belt 14 of leather or other suitable material somewhat longer than the circumference of the sheave.

15 is a motor for the sheave 13.

The sheave 13 is also provided with grooves in which run safety cables 16.

Referring to Fig. 2, it may be seen that to the car 10 is pivotally connected a yoke 20, to the opposite ends of which are .connected secondary pivoted yokes 21, 21. The

imparting rota ion to I ends of the strips 12 are provided with suitable anchorage members 17, a portion "of. each of which projects through one. of the Patented Aug. 13, 191% ends of one ofthe secondary .yokes 21 The lower ends of these anchorage members are threaded and are provided with nuts 18 which hold them in place and also provide means for adjusting the tension of the strips. The ends of the 'safety'cables 16.are provided with thimbles 19, from which depend, through the yoke 20, rods 22, the

lower ends of which are threaded and provided with nuts 23. Betweenthe nuts 23' and the lower edge of yoke .20 are inter-'1 posed light springs 24 which areunder com pression. The safety cables 16 are 'notusedto raise the car or the counterweight, and the springs are only of suflicient strength to keep them in place and to cause them to run with the strips over the grooves in the driv ng sheave which are provided for them.

This ar'z'angement on the car is designated I as a whole by the reference numeral 25.

The other ends of the strips are connected the strains on the strips are automatically equalized so that they-are all kept under .a like amount of tension.

It may be seen that the combined weight of the car and the counterweight is. sus-,

tained by the strips 12 and the driving sheave 13. ll hen the latter s rotated in one direct1on or the other the car will move up or down as the case may be, Flat metallic strips of suitable thinness to be flexible present a broad friction surface to a cylindrically faced driving sheave, and a great tractive effect is obtained by the use of such constructions, especially whenthe driving surface of the sheave is prov ded with a facing of some such material .as. leather.

It has been-found that most excellent tractive results are obtained by interpo sing:lieftween the driv ng surface of. a sheaveiand a cable, a loose belt such asul L Thisidea disclosed in Letters Patent No. 7"61,4O1ais-v sued to' George H. Reynolds under datei off May 31, st. But it was found in prac tice that the cables sooncut t hmugh such belts. In the present instance, however, the 7 advantagesof this construction and arrangement are lQtiLlIlQd without their attendant disadvantages,-for there is but little wear either on the metallic strips or on the belts, and the cutting efi'ect is entirely eliminated.

The automatic equalizer not only divides the-tensional strains upon the strips equally,

' .but also causes the driving sheave to do the same a'inou-nt "of driving on each of them.

. I have pointed out that the cables 16 run practically idly overt-the sheave 13. In other words, they are not used to move the car and counterweight, but this function is performed by thestri'ps 12. But if the strips break, the cables then sustain the. weight of a the carja-nd the'counterweightand keep them from falling. In 'such'a case thesprings 24 aresimply forced together and the nuts 23 keep the rods 22 from being pulled through the yoke 20. g

What I claim is. 7.

'1. A car, a counterweight, a fiat. metallic strip connecting and sustaining the car and the counterwei ht, a driving sheave for said strip, and a safety cable also connecting the car and the'counterwe-ightand running over said sheave. 4 v

. 2, A car, a counterweight, a flat metallic strip connecting the car and the counterweight, a driving sheave, said strip running over a portion ofsaid' sheave', and a safety cable connecting the car and coungerweight and also running over said sheavE 3. A car, .a counterweight, a flat-metallic strip connecting the car and the counter- I weight, a driving sheave supporting the. car

and the counterweight by sai strip, a safety cable connecting the car and the counterweight, and means formaintaining said cable inlight contact with said sheave. 4. A can-a counterweight,-a flat metallic strip connecting .tlie-"carand the counterweight, a-sheave ,.having a'cylindrical driving surface overhvhich the strip passes anda peripheral greetve, and a safety cable run- 11mg over'said groove, and connected with the car and counterweight.- a

- 5. A car, a counterweight, a fiat metallic strip connecting the car andfthe counterweight, a sheave'havinga cylindrical driving surface over which-the strip passes and aperipheral groove, a safety cable running over said groove and connected with thecar and counterweight, and a spring arranged to keepsaid cable-in light contact with the sheave. 6. A car, a counterweight, a flat metallic strip connecting the car and the counter- Weight, a sheave having a cylindrical drivin surface over which the strip passes, and aoose belt interposed between the sheave and said strip. I I 7. A car, a counterweight, a datmetallic strip connecfing the car and the counter noanase weight, a sheave having a cylindrical driving surface over which the strip passes and flanges, a loose belt interposed between the sheave and said strip, said flanges being adapted to retain the belt and the metallic strip in place. 7

. 8. A car, a counterweight, a flat metallic strip connecting the car and the counterweight, a sheave having a cylindrical driving surface over which the strip passes, a

loose belt interposed between the sheave and said strip, said flanges being adapted to retain the belt and the metallic strip in place,

said sheave being also providedwith a pee.

ripheral groove; a safety cable running over said groove and connected with the car and counterweight, and a spring arranged to keep said cable in light contact with the sheave.

b. A car a counterweight, a' plurality of flat metallic strips connecting the car and the counterweight, a driving sheave supporting the car and counterweight bysaid strips,

, and a safety cable" also connecting the car and the counterweight.

r 10. A car, a counterweight, a plurality of flat'metallic strips arranged side by side connecting the car and-the counterweight, a driving sheave supportingthe car and counterweight by said strips, means for equalizing the tension of said strips, and a safety cable connecting the car and counterweight and running over the sheave, and means for maintaining the cable in light contact with said sheave.

11. A car, a counterweight, a plurality of flat metallic strips arranged slde by side connecting the car and counterweight, a

sheave havingcylindrical driving portions over which said strips run, saicl sheave having flanges, and. intermediate nape grooves between said driving portions; a motor for driving the sheave, means for equ izing the tension of said-strips, safety ropes running over. the rope grooves and connecting the car and the counterweight, and springsarranged to maintain said ropes in light contact with said grooves.

12. A car, a counterweight, a plurality of fiat metallic strips arranged side by side connecting the car and the counterweight, a sheave having cylindrical portions over which said strips run, said sheave having flanges between said portions, and a lease loose h t interposed'hetween each strip and .its respective driving nortion'of the sheave, In testimony whereof I have signed my meanfor equalizing the tension of said name to'this specification in the strips, safety ropes running over the vrope two subscribing Witnesses.

groovesand connecting the. car and counter CHARLES O. PEARSON. weight, and a spring for each rope arranged Witnesses:

- to maintain it in light contact with one of EMIL BACK,

said grooves. S. J. HORVAT. 7

presence of

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3501136 *Oct 16, 1967Mar 17, 1970Voest AgDevice for lifting and lowering oxygen lances for top-blowing converters
US6193016 *Sep 30, 1998Feb 27, 2001Otis Elevator CompanyDual sheave rope climber using flat flexible ropes
US6256841 *Dec 31, 1998Jul 10, 2001Otis Elevator CompanyWedge clamp type termination for elevator tension member
US6295799Sep 27, 1999Oct 2, 2001Otis Elevator CompanyTension member for an elevator
US6345419Jan 19, 2000Feb 12, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyTermination for flat flexible tension member
US6357085Apr 30, 2001Mar 19, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyWedge clamp type termination for elevator tension member
US6364063 *Jun 22, 1999Apr 2, 2002Kone CorporationElevator rope arrangement
US6401871Feb 26, 1998Jun 11, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyTension member for an elevator
US6405833 *Jan 6, 2000Jun 18, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyFlexible flat rope sheave assembly with separate shoulder and flange surfaces having varying friction properties
US6419208Apr 1, 1999Jul 16, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyElevator sheave for use with flat ropes
US6484368Jan 11, 2000Nov 26, 2002Otis Elevator CompanyFlexible flat tension member termination device
US6513204Dec 18, 2001Feb 4, 2003Otis Elevator CompanyFlexible flat tension member termination device
US6739433Dec 22, 1998May 25, 2004Otis Elevator CompanyTension member for an elevator
US6742769Jul 1, 2002Jun 1, 2004Otis Elevator CompanyElevator sheave for use with flat ropes
US6860367 *Sep 29, 1998Mar 1, 2005Otis Elevator CompanyElevator system having drive motor located below the elevator car
US6868661Feb 27, 2002Mar 22, 2005Kone CorporationElevator rope arrangement
US7874404 *Sep 29, 1998Jan 25, 2011Otis Elevator CompanyElevator system having drive motor located between elevator car and hoistway sidewall
US7971687 *Feb 7, 2003Jul 5, 2011Otis Elevator CompanyElevator belt assembly with noise reducing groove arrangement
US8210320 *May 20, 2004Jul 3, 2012Inventio AgElevator with belt-like transmission means, particularly with wedge-ribbed belt, as support means and/or drive means
US20050077112 *Jul 23, 2004Apr 14, 2005Franz EhrenleitnerLifting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification187/254, 187/412, 187/348
Cooperative ClassificationB66B7/062
European ClassificationB66B7/06A