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Publication numberUS1050406 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1913
Filing dateSep 16, 1909
Priority dateSep 16, 1909
Publication numberUS 1050406 A, US 1050406A, US-A-1050406, US1050406 A, US1050406A
InventorsSigmund Veit
Original AssigneeSigmund Veit
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper-maker's drying-felt.
US 1050406 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. VEIT.

PAPER MAKER'S DBYING FELT.

APPLIGATION TILED SEPT. is, 1909.

Patented Jan. 14, 1913;

fiber spun together.

I paper machines.

SIGMUND vnrr, or oorrmsnn, GERMANY.

PAPER-MAKERS DRYING-FELT.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Jan. 14, 1913.

Application filed September 16, 1909. Serial No. 518,032

To all whom it may concem Be it known that I, SIGMUND Vnrr, citizen of the German Empire, residingat Goppingen, in the Kingdom of Wurttemberg, Germany, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Paper-Makers Drying- Felts; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

This invention relates to drvin felts used in the paper makers? art, such fe ts serving to feed the paper" sheet forward during the process of manufacture and at the same time to press the same against thsurface of the heated drying cylinders for the purpose of drying the same. In order to carry out this step of the process in an eiiicient manner it is aimed to provide felts which give to the paper the desired translucency and smooth appearance and leave no imprint upon the same, and which, at the same time, will not become clogged and foul. 25-

The felts hitherto employed were woven either entirely of wool, entirely of cotton, or of half-wool, that is to say, wool and cotton The felts made or woven entirely of wool possess the advantage of readily undergoing the operation of fulling, whereby a compact felted surface may be imparted to them, which is very favorable to the-quality andthe translucency of the paper produced when employing such felts. Moreover, the absorptive action of such felts and hence their drying properties are very great. The seam of such felts having been.

obliterated by the fulling process, no danger of marking the paper is to be feared. However, these woolen felts absorb too much moisture and dry .very slowly. Hence the speed of working is materially diminlshed and it often occurs that these felts become injuriously clogged and foul. This is a seriousdisadvantage in the case ofrapid In order to avoid this drawback, cotton fclts have been proposed and frequently employed. But these felts, not being susceptible of fulling, their texture is open and is impressed on the paper. The seam is also so impressed. Only an inferior quality of paper can be made with their aid under these circumstances and for the further reason that such felts are stiff and unelastic. While felts made of half woolen threads have been proposed to overcome the above objections, they have not been found to do so to any material extent and, indeed, they have for this reason found only a very restricted use in this art.

It is the object of this invention to eifectually avoid the above objections and to combine all the desirable qualities of a felt appearing from the above.

For this purpose my inventionvconsists in a felt made in twolayers, one layer being made of animal fiber such as wool, while the other layer is made of vegetable fiber, such as cotton mixed with animal fiber such as wool. The amount of animal fiber added to the vegetable or cotton fiber is preferably from 10 to 20 per cent. The thread or yarn from which the mixed cotton and wool layer is made or woven may be made by adding wool threads to the cotton threads in forming the yarn, or by add- 1ng wool to the .cotton in spinning the yarn, or by spinning half wool instead of cotton. The layer of animal fiber is the one designed to come into contact with the paper during the feeding and drying operation. The two layers are united in any suitable manner, for example by a binding warp thread similar to those employed in making piled fabrics. Said binding warp thread should be of animal fiber or wool or of half-wool, that is, of wool mixed with cotton.

In the accompanying drawing is represented diagrammatically the structure of a drying felt made according to this invention.

In this drawing Figure 1' represents asection transverse to the weft threads of such a fabric, and Fig. 2 a similar section on a plane at right angles to the plane of Fig. 1. v

The weft threads of the upper woolen or animal fiber layer of the felt are represented at a, while those of the lower mixed layer are shown at b. The connecting warp layer is represented at a.

The drying felt so made lsthen thoroughly ,fulled,whereby the entire fabric is thoroughly felted on the surface and, in case these binding threads are of wool or half wool, the said binding threads are also thoroughly fulled. The seams of the fabric are also thereby felted over and obliterated, so'that the felt will not produce; any design or crease on the paper web for which the same is employed.

The drying felt thus described combines the valuable properties of an all-wool felt with those of an all-cotton felt. By virtue of the upper layer of animal fiber it has the smoothness, elasticity and absorbent qualities of the former while the lower layer of mixed vegetable and animal fiber imparts to the same the quick drying action of the latter and thereby preserves it from decomposition and from choking up.

in some cases the drying felt thus made may be employed with the layer containing the vegetable fiber in contact with the paper, since this layer can be well fulled by reason of the wool contained therein, and its seam will leave no mark or impression.

This new drying felt combines great advantages for the art of paper making in which rapid work is of importance with con'iparative economy.

The rapid work is promoted by the absorptive properties of the same while the fact thatit lasts much longer and is cheaper to manufacture than woolen felts results in a very material economy.

W'hat l claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is l. A drying felt for paper making c'on- LUMHA'IM sisting of a layer of mixed animal and vegetable fiber, combined with a layer of animal fiber, the said drying felt being fulled and felted.

2. A drying felt for paper making consisting of a layer of cotton mixed with wool, combined with a layer of wool and a warp threadcontaining animal fiber connecting the two layers, the said drying felt being fulled and felted.

3. A drying felt for paper making consisting of a layer of mixed animal and vegetable fiber combined with a layer of animal fiber, the saiddrying felt being fulled, and felted on, substantially its surface only.

4. A drying felt for paper making consistingof a layer of cotton mixed with wool combined with a layer of wool and a warp thread containing animal fiber connecting the two layers, the said drying felt being fulle'd, and felted on, substantially its surface only.

lin testimony whereof I hereunto aflix my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

SIGMUND VlElT. Witnesses Louis MUELLER, MATHALDE K. HELD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2503629 *Jun 23, 1948Apr 11, 1950Orr Felt And Blanket CompanyWeb carrier and method of making same
US2854032 *Aug 20, 1953Sep 30, 1958William E Hooper And Sons CompDryer felt
US2991536 *Mar 10, 1954Jul 11, 1961Du PontFelted fabric and process for producing
US4086941 *Oct 26, 1976May 2, 1978Huyck CorporationBiplanar papermaker's belt
US5092373 *Aug 15, 1990Mar 3, 1992Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric with orthogonal machine direction yarn seaming loops
US5103874 *Jun 6, 1990Apr 14, 1992Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric with stacked machine direction yarns
US5117865 *Feb 14, 1991Jun 2, 1992Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric with flat high aspect ratio yarns
US5148838 *Jun 14, 1991Sep 22, 1992Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric with orthogonal machine direction yarn seaming loops
US5167261 *Jul 25, 1991Dec 1, 1992Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric with stacked machine direction yarns of a high warp fill
US5199467 *Apr 13, 1992Apr 6, 1993Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric with stacked machine direction yarns
US5230371 *Feb 3, 1992Jul 27, 1993Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric having diverse flat machine direction yarn surfaces
US5238027 *Sep 21, 1992Aug 24, 1993Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric with orthogonal machine direction yarn seaming loops
US5343896 *Sep 25, 1992Sep 6, 1994Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric having stacked machine direction yarns
US5411062 *Aug 23, 1993May 2, 1995Asten Group, Inc.Papermakers fabric with orthogonal machine direction yarn seaming loops
US5449026 *Aug 10, 1994Sep 12, 1995Asten, Inc.Woven papermakers fabric having flat yarn floats
US5645112 *Sep 7, 1995Jul 8, 1997Asten, Inc.Papermakers fabric with alternating crimped CMD yarns
US5690149 *Oct 17, 1996Nov 25, 1997Asten, Inc.Papermakers fabric with stacked machine direction yarns
US5713396 *Apr 30, 1996Feb 3, 1998Asten, Inc.Papermakers fabric with stacked machine and cross machine direction yarns
US5975148 *Feb 2, 1998Nov 2, 1999Asten, Inc.Papermakers fabric with stacked machine direction yarns forming outer floats and inner knuckles
US6189577Nov 2, 1999Feb 20, 2001Astenjohnson, Inc.Papermakers fabric with stacked machine direction yarns
USRE35966 *Jul 3, 1996Nov 24, 1998Asten, Inc.Papermakers fabric with orthogonal machine direction yarn seaming loops
DE2263476A1 *Dec 27, 1972Mar 7, 1974Nordiska Maskinfilt AbFormgewebe sowie verfahahren zu dessen herstellung
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/413, 139/383.00A
Cooperative ClassificationD03D11/00