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Publication numberUS1053340 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1913
Filing dateJun 6, 1912
Priority dateJun 6, 1912
Publication numberUS 1053340 A, US 1053340A, US-A-1053340, US1053340 A, US1053340A
InventorsAlfred A Ziegler
Original AssigneeAlfred A Ziegler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electromagnet.
US 1053340 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. A. ZIEGLER.

ELECTROMAGNET.

I APPLICATION rum J UNE6, 1912.

Patented Feb. 18, 1913.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

ZUZZ/Y/e 5 5 6 3 A. A. ZIEGLBR.

ELECTROMAGNET.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 6, 1912.

' 1,053,340. Patented Feb. 18, 1913.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

Zk imes ses J7ZU6VZ%7'I' ALFRED A. ZIEGLER, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

ELECTROMAGNET.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented'Feb. 18,1913.

Application filed June 6, 1912. Serial No. 701,977.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, ALFRED A. ZIEGLER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Boston, in the county 'of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts,have invented an improvement in Electromagnets, of which the following is a specification.

This .invention relates to electro-magnets; and has for its object to improve the construction of the same to the end that the armature maybe given acomplete quarter having a wide range of motion is required.

Figure 1 is a front elevation of an electro-magnet embodying this invention, the armature being in its retracted position. Fig. 2 is a vertical section of Fig. 1, taken on the dotted line 22. Fig. 3 is a horizontal section of Fig. 1 taken on the dotted line 33. Fig. 4 is a View similar to Fig. 3, the armature being attracted. Fig. 5 is a'perspective view of the armature. Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are details of the several plates composingthe armature. Fig. 9 is an enlarged sectional View ofa portion of one of the plates, illustrating the scale on its surface. Fig. 10 is a fragmentary detail of the polepiece and armature, the latter being in attracted position. Fig. 11 is a perspective view of a modified form ofarmature, more especially designed for use with a magnet operated by a direct current. Fig. 12 is a horizontal section of an electro-magnet,illustrating an armature embodying this inven tion with a modified form of pole.

10, 10, represent a pair of magnet-coils arranged on cores connected together by, a heel-piece 12, the forward ends of the cores being extended or prolonged, as at 13, to form the poles. The poles; 13 are formed with opposing curved pole faces 14, and said pole faces are formed with transverse interdental spaces or grooves 15, each pole face having several such interdental spaces or grooves. An advantage of forming'the pole faces with interdental spaces or grooves is the production of a large magnetic surface; they also enable the employment of an armature having portions of different leverage, as will be described.

The armature shown in Figs. 1 to 8, inclusive, is especially designed to be used with the electro-magnetwhen operated by an alternating current, and said armature is made S-shape, and is composed of a pile of superimposed iron plates, partially insulated from each other and rigidly secured together. As here shown seven S-shaped plates are employed, as 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22 and between the several plates, or

most of them, separating plates 23 are pro-" vided. Some of the plates are made longer than others, as for instance, the plates 16, 18, 20 and 22 aremade longer than the plates 17 19'and 21, and when said plates are rigidly secured together and to a center shaft 30, the longer plates will project bethe outer'faces or ends of the armature will be complementary with the opposing indented or grooved pole faces. The feet of the several plates, or most of them, are made of different length, but their heels are arranged in the same vertical plane, hence.

their toes terminate different distances from the back side of the armature. This admits of the different plates entering the magneticfield successively and of the magnetic force actingincreasingly to pull the armature in order that a full quarter turn may be given to it, and also to hold the armature in its full attracted position.

Referring particularly to Fig. 5, the feet of the short plates 17 and 21 are made longest, their toes first entering the magnetic-field; the foot of the plate 19 is made shorter than the feet of the plates 17 and 21, and next enters the magnetic-field; the foot of the plate 20is made shorter than the foot of the plate 19 and next enters the magneticfield; the foot of the plate 18 is made shorter than the foot of the plate 20, and next enters the magnetic field and the feet of the plates 16 and 22 are made the shortest of all and next enter the'magnetic-field. The separating plates 23 are made as long as the longest plates of the set, but have heels only, which lastly enter the magnetic-field. The above yond the ends of the shorter plates, so that may be otherwise arranged than as here shown, but when the opposing pole faces are formed with interdental spaces the alternate arrangement of the short and long plates is necessary to form complementary outer faces. As a means to partially insulate the several plates from each other I prefer to take the plates as they may come from the annealing furnace, without removing the scale which is formed thereon, as shown in Fig. 9. The scale which is formed on them affords a partial magnetic insulation which I find toybe quite suflicient, although other means to partially insulate them may 'be employed. In case the magnet is connected with a direct current the modified form of armature shown in Fig. 11 is preferably employed, although the armature above described will sufiice.

Referring to Fig. 11, the armature is composed of superimposed partially insulated plates, some of which are made longer thanothers, but the feet of all the short plates are made the same length and the feet of all the long plates are also made of the same length.

In bot-l1 forms of armature here shown, the outer faces thereof work on the inside of the magnetic-field, where the magnetic pull is the strongest. I

I find, in practice, that by making the plates composing the armature of different length and forming the opposing pole faces with interdental spaces that a powerful pull is obtained, which is quite uniform during each unit of movement, and the semaphore. arm or disk attached to the center-shaft 30 or other work which it is desired to perform, will be uniformly and progressivelyaccomplished.

In the modification shown in Fig. '12, the opposing curved pole faces are not formed with interdental spaces and consequently the plates composing the armature are all made of the same length, although their feet are of dilferent length, and I find in practice that such form is very efficient, but notas efficient as the forms above described, either for alternating or direct current work.

1. The combination with an electro-magnet having opposing pole faces curved and formed with transverse grooves, of a rotatable armature of S-shape having its outer ends made complementary to said grooved pole faces, substantially as described. I

2. The combination with an electro-magnet having opposing curved pole faces with transverse interdental recesses, of a rotatable armature of S-shape composed of'a pile of superimposed plates, some of which are longer than others to thus form its outer faces complementary to said pole faces, substantially as described.

3. The combination with an electro-magnet having opposing curved pole faces with transverse interdental recesses, of a rotatable armature of S-shape composed of a pile of superimposed plates partially insulated from each other, some of which are longer than others to thus form its outer faces complementary to said pole faces, substantially as described.

4. The combination with an electro-magnet having opposing curved pole faces with transverse interdental recesses, of a rotatable armature of S-shape composed of a pile of superimposed plates, some of which are longer than others to thus form its outer faces complementary tosaid pole faces, and some having feet longer than others arranged with their heels in the same vertical plane, whereby their toes enter the magnetic field successively, substantially as described.

5. The combination with an 'electro-magnet having opposing curved pole faces, of a rotatable armature of S-shape having both of its outer ends formed with feet of different length, all of said feet being arranged for movement between said curved pole faces, thereby to work on the inside of the magnetic field, substantially as described.

6. The combination with an electro-magnet having opposing curved pole faces com posed of several plates made S-shape, and several separating plates, all of said plates being arranged in a pile with the separating plates between the S-shaped plates and rigidly secured together and to a centershaft, substantially as described.

7. The combination of an electro-magnet having opposing curved pole faces, of a rotatable armature composed of several plates made S-shape and having feet of different length and several separating plates, said plates being arranged in a pile with the separating plates between the S-shapcd plates and rigidly secured together and to a centershaft, substantially as described.

8. The combination with an electro-magnet having opposing curved pole faces, of a rotatable armature composed of several plates made S-shape and several separating plates, said plates being arranged in a pile with the separating plates between the shaped plates and rigidly secured together and to a Center-shaft and insulation between the several plates, whereby theyare partially magnetically insulated, substantially as described.

9. The combination with an electro-magnet having opposing curved pole faces with transverse interdental recesses, of a rota table armature composed of several plates In testimony whereof, I have signed my made S-shape, some made longer than others name tothis specification, in the presence of and several separating plates, all'of said two subscribing witnesses.

' 4 plates being arranged in a pile with thelong ALFRED A. ZIEGLER.

5 and short plates alternately disposed to Witnesses form outer faces complementary with the 1 B. J. NOYES, pole faces, substantially as described. H. B. DAVIS.

Referenced by
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US2428784 *Apr 11, 1945Oct 14, 1947Lamb Electric CompanyMagnetic motor starting switch
US2538817 *Nov 20, 1946Jan 23, 1951Kellogg Switchboard & SupplyElectromagnetic counting device
US2629031 *Aug 17, 1946Feb 17, 1953Ballman Engineering CompanyElectromagnetic switch
US2824189 *Oct 17, 1955Feb 18, 1958Gen ElectricElectro-magnetic switching device
US2827528 *Apr 28, 1955Mar 18, 1958Leland Electric Canada LtdElectromagnetic switch
US2833508 *Feb 8, 1952May 6, 1958Baso IncElectromagnetic control device
US2952755 *Nov 22, 1957Sep 13, 1960Westinghouse Air Brake CoElectrical relays
US3047224 *Feb 25, 1959Jul 31, 1962Gen Controls CoElectromagnetic counter
US4522371 *Jun 20, 1983Jun 11, 1985Borg-Warner CorporationProportional solenoid valve
US4715396 *Aug 2, 1985Dec 29, 1987Borg-Warner CorporationProportional solenoid valve
US4875499 *Sep 30, 1987Oct 24, 1989Borg-Warner CorporationProportional solenoid valve
US4947887 *Sep 25, 1989Aug 14, 1990Borg-Warner CorporationProportional solenoid valve
US4967781 *Apr 5, 1989Nov 6, 1990Borg-Warner Automotive Electronic & Mechanical Systems CorporationProportional solenoid valve
US5027846 *Jul 27, 1990Jul 2, 1991Borg-Warner Automotive Electronic & MechanicalElectromechanical
US5110087 *Jun 21, 1991May 5, 1992Borg-Warner Automotive Electronic & Mechanical Systems CorporationVariable force solenoid hydraulic control valve
EP0132030A2 *May 25, 1984Jan 23, 1985Borg-Warner CorporationProportional solenoid valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification335/272, 335/266, 335/279, 335/281
Cooperative ClassificationH01F7/145