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Publication numberUS1056008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1913
Filing dateAug 16, 1912
Priority dateAug 16, 1912
Publication numberUS 1056008 A, US 1056008A, US-A-1056008, US1056008 A, US1056008A
InventorsAlfred Cotton
Original AssigneeJohn F Potts, Alfred Cotton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe-ventilator.
US 1056008 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. COTTON.

SHOE VBNTILATOR.

APPLIOATIQN FILED AUG.16, 1912.

1,056,008, Patented Mar. 18, 1913.

LOLUMDIA PL ANOGRAPH co., WASHINGTON. D. C

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ALFRED COTTON, OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF T0 JOHN F.

POTTS, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

SHOE-VENTILATOR.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed August 16, 1912. Serial No. 715,383.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, ALFRED COTTON, a subject of the King of Great Britain, residing in the city of Newark, county of Essex, and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and. useful Improvements in Shoe-Ventilators, of which the following is a specification.

The main object of this invention is to provide a simple device adapted to be placed in a low or Oxford style of shoe in such a position that it will not be uncomfortable to the wearer and will serve as a means for permitting hot air in the shoe to escape and as a passage through which cool air may be drawn into the shoe.

Another object of the invention is to provide a simple device which may be readily applied to any shoe and which may be placed in or withdrawn from the shoe while it is being worn.

Another object of the invention is to provide a simple device adapted to fit under the arch of the wearers foot and against the soft fleshy part thereof, means being provided whereby the device may be suspended from the upper edge of the shoe.

There are other important objects and advantages of the invention which will appear hereinafter.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of a low Oxford style of shoe with a ventilating device applied thereto; Fig. 2 a transverse sectional view of one side of the shoe showing the position of the ventilator and the means for supporting it; and Fig. 3 a detail perspective View of the ventilator detached from the shoe.

Referring to the various parts by numerals, 1 designates the main body of the ventilator which is convex on its inner side and is shaped to conform as closely as possible with the downwardly and inwardly curved part of the inner side of the foot under the arch. This body part is of a suitable width and is of a length sufiicient to extend from the upper edge of the shoe to a point under the arch and close to the inner sole. Its upper edge 2 is turned slightly outwardly to avoid any sharp edges and to prevent the said upper edge catching in the stocking or sock of the wearer when withdrawin the device from the shoe. Along the longitudinal edges of the body part of the ventilator are formed outwardly extending side flanges 3 whose free edges are adapted to bear against the inner surface of the side of the shoe, thereby forming a channel or ventilating flue from a point slightly above the inner sole to the upper edge of the shoe, At the upper ends of the side flanges 3 outwardly extending hooks 4 are formed which are adapted to engage the upper edge of the shoe and to suspend the ventilator. It is manifest that these hooks may be of any suitable form and of any desired size.

It is manifest that the ventilating device may be formed of any suitable material and that the side flanges 3 may be of any suitable depth. It is also manifest that this device may be placed in a shoe at any time and may be readily removed Whenever desired.

The device is very effective in ventilating the shoes while the wearer is walking. The action of the foot in the shoe to which the ventilator is applied serves to first expel or drive hot air from within the shoe up through the ventilator when the wearers weight is thrown on the foot, and then to draw cool air down through the ventilator when the wearers weight is taken off the foot that is being ventilated and thrown on the other foot, in the act of walking.

It is manifest that the ventilating device may be inserted through the side of a high shoe in the same position with respect to the foot, as described with respect to the low shoe. This may be readily done by cutting a slot in the side of the shoe at the proper point on the inner side thereof and inserting the ventilating device therein.

What I claim is:

1. A shoe ventilator comprising a downwardly extending and inwardly curved body part formed with outwardly extending side flanges to form a ventilating channel or flue,

and means for suspending said device on the upper of a shoe.

2. A shoe ventilator comprising a downwardly extending and inwardly curved body part formed with outwardly extending side flanges to form a ventilating channel or flue, and means for detachably connecting said device to the shoe.

3. A ventilating device comprising a body part concave on its inner surface and adapt ed to be disposed in the shoe so that the lower end thereof will project beneath the arch of the foot of the wearer and formed with, outwardly extending side flanges adapted to bear against the inner side of the shoe to form a ventilating channel, and means at the upper end of said body part to detachably engage the upper of the shoe.

4. A ventilating device comprising a body part concave on its inner surface and adapted to be disposed in the shoe so that the lower end thereof will project beneath the' arch of the foot of the wearer and formed with outwardly extending side adapted to bear against the inner side of the shoe to form a ventilating channel, and outwardly extending hooks connected to the upper end of said body part and adapted to engage the upper of the shoe.

5. A shoe ventilator comprising an insertible channel-forming body part concave on its inner surface to conform to the side of the foot of the wearer under the arch flanges thereof and provided with means for detachably connecting said ventilator to a shoe.

6. A shoe Ventilator comprising an insertible channel-forming body part concave on its inner surface to conform to the side of the foot of the wearer umier the arch thereof, and means to detachably connect the upper end of said ventilator to the upper of a shoe.

7. A shoe ventilator comprising an insertible channel-forming body part concave on its inner surface to conform to the side of the foot of the wearer under the arch thereof, and outwardly extending hooks connected to the upper end of said ventilator to adapt it to engage the upper of a shoe.

In testimony whereof I hereunto aflix my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

ALFRED COTTON.

Witnesses LILLIAN MoGUnui, F. R. MILLER.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents. Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2560591 *Jul 11, 1949Jul 17, 1951Oltrogge Bernard WFoot ventilating shoe
US4640027 *Oct 22, 1985Feb 3, 1987Remo BerleseMotorcycle boot with positive air circulation
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/3.00A
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/06