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Publication numberUS1056526 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1913
Filing dateMar 12, 1912
Priority dateMar 12, 1912
Publication numberUS 1056526 A, US 1056526A, US-A-1056526, US1056526 A, US1056526A
InventorsJames Bell Fortnam
Original AssigneeJames Bell Fortnam
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus.
US 1056526 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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1,056,526, Patented Mar. 18,1913

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y each side Iof the paths 16 are formed by `tive UNITED STATES OFFICE.

JAMES BELL FORTNAM, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

GAME APPARATUS.

To all whom t may concern."

Be it known that I, JAMES B. FoR'rNAM, a citizen of the United States, and a resident rof the city of New York, borough of Brooklyn, in the county of Kings and State of New York, have invented a new and Improved Game Apparatus, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

My invention relates to games, and it has for its object 'to provide a new game apparatus with which may be played several interesting games, the game apparatus consisting of a board with a group of forty-one hexagonal spaces, there being a star in the space in the center of the hoard, and marks to indicate the castles which are spaced apart at each side of the board. Around the group of the said spaces there are a plurality of markings, spaced apart, upon which the players may each move their pieces, the play of which is confined to these markings around the group of the hexagonal spaces. These pieces, when located on certain of the markings limit the plays which may be made by the opposing player on the group of the hexagonal spaces.

Additional objects of the invention will appear in the following compl-ete specification in which the preferred form of the invention is disclosed.

In the drawings similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views, in which- Figure 1 is a plan view of the board; Fig. 2 is a view showing one of the pieces designated as kings Fig. 3 is a view showing one of the pieces designated as knights Fig. 4 is a view showing one of the pieces designated as dukes and Fig. 5 is a view showing one of the pieces designated as block pieces By referring to the drawings it will be seen that the board 11 is marked with hexagonal spaces, the sides of which are parallel with adjacent hexagonal spaces. These hexagonal spaces, which are referred to on the drawings by the reference character 12, are disposed from the side 13 of t-he board to the side 111 of the board, and with sides parallel with the said sides 13 and 14; The center column or path 15 extends from one side of the board to the other, and is formed by seven hexagonal spaces, and the paths 16, one at each side of the path 15 is formed by six hexagonal spaces. The paths 17, one at Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed March 12, 1912.

Patented Mar. 18,1913.

serial No. 683,210.

hexagonal spaces, and the paths 18, one at each side of the paths 17, are formed by six hexagonal. spaces. The hexagonal spaces in the paths 15 and 17 are colored in contrast to the hexagonal spaces forming the paths 18and 16. The spaces 1821 and 18b at the ends of the paths 18, and the spaces 15a and `15b at the ends of the path 15 are distinguished by characters, and are referred to as castles, the spaces 15ZL and 18SL having thereon the characters 19, and the spaces 15b and 18b having printed thereon the characters 20. The central space 21 in the path 15 has a star 22 printed thereon. Around the board there are markings 23, 24, 25 and 26, which are spaced apart as will be seen by referring to Fig. 1 of the drawings. The markings 23 are of thc same color as the hexagonal spaces in the paths 16, and 1S, while the markings 24 are of the same color as the hexagonal spaces in the paths 15 and 17. There are arrows 27 on the board, which indicate how the duke piece may be moved on the markings 23, 24, 25 and 2G, with certain results.

In Fig. 2 of the drawings I show one of the pieces designated as a king, and indicated by reference character 28.

In Fig. 3 I show one of the pieces designated as a knight, indicated by the reference character 29.

In Fig. 4 I show one of the pieces designated as a duke, and indicated by the reference character 30.

In Fig. 5 I show a block piece, and indicated by the reference character 31.

Several very interesting games may be played with my game apparatus, one of these games is a game which I designate as the hexagon game, which may be played by two players, the rules of which are as follows:

The game is played on a diagram of fortyone hexagonal spaces. Three spaces for each side, designated by emblems which are called castles, surrounded by eight circular spaces.

Picena-Each side hasten pieces; one king, three knights and six block pieces.`

Moves.

King lmona- The king has two ways of moving-1st, position move; 2d, jumping move. 1st, position move is a move of one space in any direction to an unoccupied space; 2d, jumping move is a move made by jumping one or a number o-f allied or opponents pieces, under the following restrictions. Tn jumping allied pieces, the king has the option of jumping one or several as he elects. In jumping opponents pieces, which constitutes capture, the king is compelled to complete the full series of jumps, unless it is possible for him to branch off over allied pieces.

Ocptm"ng.-The king captures opponents pieces by jumping. It is compulsory for the king to capture on direct jumps when` possible if opponent so elects, unless an allied knight can make the capture by direct or indirect jumps. Direct means over opponents pieces. Indirect means over allied pieces first. The king has the power of jumping` any piece on the board.

Knight@ m0ve.-Tlie knight moves are similar to the king moves, except that he cannot jump his allied king or knight, nor is it compulsory for him to jumper capture opponents pieces. Be it understood that allied pieces remain on the board when jumped.

Bloch pieces-The block vpieces move one space at a time in a forward direction to space at a time in a forward direction to unoccupied spaces. Forward direction means any of the three heXagons in front of it.. Block pieces cannot jump.

Block j pieces cm'ghtcd.-A block piece reaching any of the opponent-s castles must be given the power of a knight starting from that position.

l/Vz'nm'iig the gama-The game is won when the opponents king is captured, or when the allied king reaches one of the opponents castles.

Sabazia-There are four set-ups possible in starting this game; one of these set-ups is by placing the king on the hexagonal space marked 5, knights on the spaces marked 4, 6 and 8, and block pieces on spaces marked 1, 2, 3, 7, 9 and 10. Another set-up is by placing the king on the space 5, the knights on the spaces 3, 6 and 7, and the block pieces on spaces 1, 2, 4, 8, 9 and 10. Still ano-ther set-up is by placing the king on the space 5, the knight pieces on the spaces 1, 6 and 9, and the block pieces on the spaces 2, 3, t, 7, 8 and 10. Still another setup is by placing the king on the space 5, the knights on the spaces 2, 6 and 10, and the block pieces on the spaces 1, 3, 4:, 7, 8 and 9.

The player having chosen one of the setups starts by moving any piece one space, or jumping one of his knights over one or more allied pieces, black starting first. It is better to choose one particular set-up till familiar with the game, after which black chooses irst and white may oppose with any of the four. The gaine may also be played with the outside move, called the duke move, for which see hexagon chess, the rules for this particular part being the saine.

Odds-If one party is a superior player he may give the odds of a duke, a knight, or block piece to make up the deciency.

Another interesting gaine is the game of hexagon chess, the rules for playing which are as follows, diagram same as for hexagen:

Pz'eces.-Each side has eleven pieces; one king, three knights, six block pieces, and the outside piece, called the duke.

Moves.

King mores-The king has two ways of moving-1st, position move; 2d, jumping move. 1st, position move, is a move one space in any direction to an unoccupied space. 2d, iiinping move, is made by jumping one or a number of opponents pieces in any direction which constitutes capture. It

`is not compulsory for the king to jump and when doing so may jump as many or as few as' he elects.

Km'g/is move- The knights move in any direction and as far as the player desires,

provided they move only in a straight line.`

They may not pass over a piece but may capture an oppo-siiig piece by moving into the space occupied by that piece, thus re- Tlie knight Bloc/c pcoeS.-The block pieces can be 4moved one space at a time in a forward direction to unoccupied spaces. -rection means any of the three hexagonal Forward dispaces in front of it. They may capture any opposing piece or pieces in their path by jumping, provided there is a vacant space beyond each piece captured. Any of these pieces reaching o-pponents emblems must be given the power of a kinght, starting from that space. vThe space bearing the star does not enter into hexagon chess, and none of the pieces can move on or over it. Block pieces must capture when possible.

Moves of the dukca-The duke pieces are placed on the markings of the circular spaces 26. They may move to the adjacent circle at the right or left at each turn to move. Dukes capture when adjacent, and when moving in the direction of the arrows. It is compulsory to capture when possible. Not

more than one circuit of the boaid can be made by the duke pieces before moving some other piece. When the duke piece occupies an opponents circular space it prevents moves by opponents king and block pieces occupying similar colored spaces. This rule does not affect the knight pieces.

ll'itm'ng the gamer-The game is won when the opponents king is captured.

The set-ups are the same as for the hcxagon game,

Opening the game-Black starts first bymoving king, knight, block pieces or duke. White follows.

Still another interesting game which may be played with my gaine apparatus is the game entitled giants castle, the rules for playing which are as follows:

Number of playera-The game may be played by five, three, or two persons.

Fz'oe playera-Pieces: One player takes a king piece. The other four players take each any three similar pieces called blocks.

Block moves. Each of the four block players begin in turn by placing a block on any one of the six emblems. The second and succeeding moves may consist in moving his block that is on the board (if any) or starting another block on an emblem. The block piece can move only one space in any direction to another unoccupied space. The block pieces cannot capture except when reaching the start space if the king piece occupies it.

King moves-The king moves from the star space any number of spaces in the direction indicated by the pointers on the start, then turns, and moves as before. The king must stop at a space occupied by a block, capture and remove him before proceeding further.

Wz'mzz'fngf-The king wins when he captures all the block pieces. A block piece reaching the star space wins.

Three players-Then three persons play, one takes the king, the other two divide the twelve block pieces equally, using each o-ne kind to distinguish the players. Two separate block pieces are played at each turn by each player.

T100 playera-When two persons play, one takes the king, the other the twelve block pieces, playing three separate ones at each turn.

A fourth game, entitled hop toad, may be played with my game apparatus, and following are the rules for the playing of this game: This game is one that will be readily understood by the children. The starting position, for this game is arranged by placing t-he bloc-k pieces on the spaces 1, 3, 15a` 5, 7 and 9. The opposing side is arranged in the same position. The object of the game is to place one of your men on one of the opponents three emblems or vice versa. Each party can move one piece at a time in any of the three forward directions. They can also jump any of their own men or any of their opponents men, but when j-umping their opponents men they remove them from' the board. In jumping their own pieces, said pieces remain on the board. Thej7 cannot move backward, but may jump back over their own pieces if in a position to do so. The men can jumpin any direct-ion over their own pieces or opponents pieces, and as many as they like. The center space bearing the star cannot be occupied by any piece, nor can a piece be taken that would cause a piece to land on that space, but this space may be jumped and treated as though a permanent piece were stationed there.

Wz'nm'ng the v gama-The game is won when a piece gains an opponents emblem.

Having thus described niy invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. In a game apparatus, a board having a plurality of hexagonal spaces, the spaces in cach path from one players side of the board to the other players side being colored in contrast with the spaces in adjacent paths extending in the same direction.

2. In a game apparatus a board having a path of seven `hexagonal spaces, extending from one side of the board to the other, and with sides parallel with the said sides of the board, a path of six hexagonal spaces at each side of the first-mentioned path, with sides parallel with the sides ofthe first-mentioned spaces, a path of five hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and a path of six hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces.

3. In a game apparatus a board having a path of seven hexagonal spaces extending from o-ne side of the board to the other, and with sides parallel with the said sides of the board, a path of six hexagonal spaces at each side of the first-mentioned path, with sides parallel with the sides of the first-mentioned spaces, a path of tive hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces,- and With sides parallel with the sides of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces, a path of six hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the third-lnentioned hexagonal spaces,

the first and third-mentioned pahts of hexagonal spaces being colored in contrast with the other spaces.

4. In a game apparatus a board having a path of seven hexagonal spaces, extending from one side of the board to the other, and with sides parallel with the said sides of the board, a path of six hexagonal spaces at each side of t-he first-mentioned path, with sides parallel with the sides of the first-mentioned spaces, a path of five hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and a path of six hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides paralel with the sides of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, the end spaces in the irst and in the fourth paths being marked in contrast with the other spaces.

5. In a game apparatus a board having a path of seven hexagonal spaces, extending from one side of the board to the other, and with sides parallel with the said sides of the board', a path of six hexagonal spaces at each Side of the first-mentioned path, with sides parallel with the sides of the first-mentioned spaces, a path of five hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the second mentioned hexagonal spaces, and a path of six hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the third-inentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, the end spaces in the irst and in the fourth paths being marked in contrast with the other spaces, the center space being marked in contrast with the other spaces.

6. In a game apparatus a board having a group of spaces on which pieces may be played, and markings spaced apart around the said group on which an additional piece may be played, and an arrow indicating the directio-n of certain plays for the lastmentioned piece. i

7 In a game apparatus, a board having a 'path composed of a plurality of hexagonal spaces extending from one side of the board to the opposite side, and with sides parallel with the said sides of the board, a path of hexagonal spaces at each side ofthe firstmentioned path, and with sides parallel with the sides of the first mentioned path, the said spaces in each of the second-mentioned paths being one `less in number than the spaces of the first path, a path of hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the second- Lmentioned hexagonal spaces, the hexagonal spaces in each of the third-inentioned paths being one less in number than the hexagonal spaces in the second-mentioned paths, a path of hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, the hexagonal spaces in the fourthmentioned path being one more in number than the hexagonal spaces in the third-mentioned path.

8. In a game apparatus a board having a path of seven hexagonal spaces, extending from one side of the board to the other, and with sides parallel with the said sides of the board, a path of six hexagonal spaces at each side of the first-mentioned path, with sides parallel with the sides of the first-mentioned spaces, a path of five hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the second-inentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the second-inentioned hexagonal spaces, and a path of six hexagonal spaces at the outer side of -each of the tliird-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, markings spaced apart, around the hexagonal spaces on which a piece may be played, and an arrow indicating the direction of certain plays.

9. In a game apparatus a board having a path of seven hexagonal spaces extending from one side of the board to the other, and with sides parallel with the said sides of the board, a path of six hexagonal spaces at each side of the first-mentioned path, with sides parallel with the sides of the firstmentioned spaces, a path of tive hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the second-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the second- `mentioned hexagonal spaces, a path of six hexagonal spaces at the outer side of each of the third-mentioned hexagonal spaces, and with sides parallel with the sides of the third-mentioned hexagonal-spaces, the {i1-st and third mentioned paths of hexagonal spaces being colored in contrast with the other spaces, and markings spaced apart around the hexagonal spaces in each of said colors.

In testimony whereof I have signed myI vname to this specification in the presence Copies of this patent may be obtained for ve cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

/ Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2531510 *Oct 2, 1945Nov 28, 1950Heacock Woodrow AGame board and cards adapted to be utilized therewith
US4146234 *Jul 12, 1977Mar 27, 1979Le Floch Jacques N Y MParlor game with pieces which can be moved on compartments
US4555116 *Jun 10, 1982Nov 26, 1985Fields F HerbertGO Game employing hexagonally shaped spaces
US20110127719 *Aug 24, 2007Jun 2, 2011Jan HornikElectronic Board Game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/258, 273/263, 273/261
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/02