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Publication numberUS1069364 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1913
Filing dateAug 17, 1908
Priority dateAug 17, 1908
Publication numberUS 1069364 A, US 1069364A, US-A-1069364, US1069364 A, US1069364A
InventorsRudolph G Winter
Original AssigneeRudolph G Winter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suspension-hinge.
US 1069364 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. G. WINTER. SUSPENSION HINGE. APPLICATION TILED AUG. 17, 1908.

Patented Aug. 5, 1913.

W 9 i wm wit" eases %Q%% W El/M UNITED -W RUDOLPH Gr. WINTER, OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN.

SUSPENSION-HINGE.

To all whom 2'15 may concern:

Be it known that I, RUDoLrH G. IVINTER, of Milwaukee, \Visconsin, have invented a Suspension-Hinge, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to detachable hinges for suspension sashes such as are ordinarily used in storm-windows, outside windowscreens, and other purposes.

The object in view in the present invention is to provide certain improved constructions and adaptations of the hinge previously invented by me and patented August 30, 1898 No. 610,010, in order to make said hinge more efficient, stronger in construction, and easier of detachment. It will be seen from the drawings of my former patent that said hinge offers some difficulties in detachment, inasmuch as the sash requires to be swung very wide open before it can be raised and detached, and even then is likely to stick because of the fact that the downwardly turned lip on the upper end of the lower member of the hinge engages in a diflicultly releasable manner the inwardly turned lip of the upper member of the hinge. In the present invention I have avoided this by certain new conformation of both members, and I have accomplished this while at the same time retaining the absolute tightness of the joint and nonvibrating qualities when the window-sash is closed.

The nature of the improvements referred to will best be understood from a consideration of the accompanying drawings taken in connection with the following detailed description thereof.

In these drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of the hinge in the open position of the sash ready to be detached, showing the sash and frame to which it is attached in crosssection; Fig. 2 is a longitudinal central section therethrough on a magnified scale, showing also the wide extent to which the sash can be opened if desired; Fig. 3 is a front elevation of the upper member or strap of the hinge; Fig. l is a plan view thereof; Fig. 5 is a view of the back or inner side thereof; Fig. 6 is a front elevation of the hook or lower member of the-hinge; and Fig. 7 is an elevation thereof from the inner side.

In these drawings every reference letter and numeral refers always to the same part.

The hinge comprises the two separable elements A and B, the former being the upper Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed August 17, 1908.

Patented Aug. 5,1913.

Serial No. 448,775.

member or strap, and the latter being the lower member or hook. In Figs. 1 and 2 these are shown as attached to a windowor door-frame C and a sash or door D respectively. The upper member A is formed with an outward bend a in the middle, the two extremities of being the bases which lie against the face of the window or door frame, and provided with suitable means of attachment such as screw-holes a Thus far the member A is the same as that shown in my patent before referred to. The improved form of the member A however comprises a recess a cut out of the bottom of the bend a; a central depression a at the upper side thereof; and a pair of triangularly pointed lugs a on the inner sides of the ends of, which lugs are adapted to bite into the wood as shown in F ig. 2, and thus contribute to the stability and firmness of the hold of the strap A upon the frame, relieving the screws from a part of the weight thereof. I have found that in my hinge as formerly constructed the members would be apt to work loose, especially in the case of heavy sashes, unless very large screws were used; and while additional screws might have been added, this would add materially not only to the first cost of the hinge, but also to the amount of labor in putting it up, and would also disfigure the window-frame to a greater extent. On the other hand, if only two screws be used, the necessary length of these screws considerably adds to the labor of putting up the hinge; but by the use of the lugs a I am enabled to use short screws only. Moreover the labor in putting up the hinge with these lugs is still further diminished by the fact that the strap A can be set and driven into place with a hammer before any screw-holes are made, both hands of the carpenter being then free to drive the screws in the screw-holes 64 whereas with the hinges as previously constructed it was necessary first to mark the holes with an awl-point or pencil while holding the hinge in place, then remove the hinge while making a hole for the screw, and finally to drive the screw after inserting it into one of the holes a this operation requiring therefore much time and energy which is by my improvement rendered unnecessary.

The lower member or hook B of the hinge is made with a base Z), an intermediate off set 5 an upright portion 6 above the offset, a horizontal portion o having a length equal to the width of the depression a and a downwardly turned oblique end 6 The member B is further reinforced throughout its entire length by a longitudinal rib Z).

In the form of the strap as previously constructed the hooked end of the strap was made vertical, and the heel or upper surface of the offset portion 6 was made substantially horizontal. This resulted in making the sash difficult of removal since, as will. be seen from the drawings of my aforesaid patent, said downwardly bent end would become partially locked under the inwardly projecting portion of the strap, and also the heel or upper surface oftheoffset portion, by striking against the lower edge of the strap, would prevent the hook from being raised and separated therefrom. Furthermore the opening angle of the sash was limited to some extent by the vertical angle of the downwardly bent end. These disadvantages have been avoided by the formation of the hook already described, in conjunction with the novel formation of the strap. It will. be seen that the lower face 6 of the hook-end b is made inclined, and the upper face b of the offset 6 is likewise made inclined, but the angle of slope of the surface 72 is less than that of the surface If. This enables the member B to clear the member A as soon as the sash has been opened through a predetermined angle, which is shown in Fig. 1, said angle being where the heel of the ofiset 6 comes directly under the bend a. The surface 6 being oblique, does not at this point engage under the inner surface of the depression (6 but stands vertical so that the hook may in this position be readily lifted out of the strap; but this is not the limiting opening of the sash, as in the original form of hinge. On the contrary, the sash may now, as will be seen, be opened to a still further extent as shown by the dotted line position in Fig. 2, and in so further opening the sash the surface Z) of the hooked end will become en gaged with the inner surface of the depression a while the upper surface of said bent end at the same time approaches the surface of the sash-frame C; so that the hinge cannot be separated in this position. Thus I attain a considerable wider angle of opening, while at the same time it will be seen that the sash can be removed at a very limited angle of opening, and at no other angle. Therefore it becomes easier to remove the sash when desired, and more difficult for the sash to become accidentally detached itself. As regards the surface 6 of the offset, it should be understood that it is not absolutely essential to working that this be made sloping, nor that it be made of a less slope than the surface 6 though if made horizontal it would require a larger angle of opening to detach the hinge, and if made sloping at the same angle at the surface 5 it would then become possible to detach the hinge in the closed position, which is to be avoided as this would result in instability of operation.

The member B is provided on its inner face with triangularly pointed lugs b", which are similarly shaped to the lugs a, and for the same purpose; and in the pre ferred form shown the lugs a are made with a horizontal lower surface (17, while the lugs b are made with a horizontal upper surface I); said horizontal surface being at right angles to the direction of force acting on the respective members of the hinge, and therefore preventing any tendency to enlargement of the holes in the wood. Said lugs are placed in the center-line of the hinge immediately behind the rib 6, re placing the screw holes which were formerly placed in this position, and as securing means I provide on opposite sides of the member 13 slots or recesses D which are adapted to receive screws. This formation is by far superior to the central screw-holes previously used, as they can be formed in cast metal witho'utcore's; and in conjunction with the lugs b, they perform all the functions of screw-holes, which they would not do unless such lugs were provided, since said lugs prevent the recesses Z2 from be coming disengaged from the screws.

The depression a as shown in my improved form presents considerable superiority to the inturned tongue of my hinge as previously constructed, since it con nected continuously with the rest of the metal of the' bend and cannot become bent or broken. It should be observed that the hinge when in closed position is perfectly tight because the upper edge of the depres sion (4 engages in the angle between the horizontal portion 5 and hooked portion 7), while at the same time the lower edge of the bend a" abuts tightly in the angle between the offset 6 and upright part 6 At the same time, the moment the sash is open the two members of the hinge are loose and have a certain amount of play one on the other, so that the sash opens freely.

The recess a in the bottom of the strap contributes to a large extent to the freedom of motion and separation of the hinge, enabling the heel of the offset 5 to project considerably above the upper edge of the sash D, and thereby preventing the upper edge of the sash from becoming engaged with the strap in mounting and dismounting the hinge. It may be observed that the strengthening rib b acts in conjunction with the lugs I) to enable the member B to be driven into the wood without breakage or bending since said lugs are directly subtended by said rib.

While I have hereinabove shown the most improved form of my invention, I wish it understood that not all of the features are essential thereto or necessarily made in the exact form shown, but various changes and modifications in the constructions as herein shown may be made without departing from the spirit of my invention, and I wish it understood therefore that the latter is not otherwise limited than by the reasonable scope of my claims.

Havinothus described my invention, what I cIaim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a suspension-hinge, a lower member thereof having on each side of its base an open-sided laterally facing slot or recess adapted to engage with a screw-head, and a pair of inwardly projecting lugs on the inner face of said base adapted to bite into and engage with the material of the sash.

2. In a suspension-hinge, a lower member thereof having on each side of its base an open-sided laterally facing slot or recess adapted to engage with a screw-head, and a pair of inwardly projecting pyramidal lugs on the inner face of said base adapted to bite into and engage with the material of the sash, said lugs having plane horizontal upper surfaces.

3. A separable suspension-hinge comprising, in combination, an upper member or strap having a portion standing out from the sash-frame, the upper edge of said standing-out portion being depressed, and a lower member or hook having a hooked end engaging over said standing-out portion of the first member and having an oblique lower surface.

4. A separable suspension-hinge comprising, in combination, a strap or upper member having basal end-portions united by an outward bend having an oblique depression in the upper edge, and a lower member or hook having a base-portion surmounted by an offset portion, an upright portion, and a hooked portion having an oblique lower surface, in the order named.

5. A separable suspension-hinge comprising, in combination, a strap or upper member having basal end-portions united by an outward bend having an oblique depression in the upper edge, and a lower member or hook having a base-portion surmounted by an offset portion, an upright portion, and a hooked portion having an oblique lower surface, in the order named, the upper surface of said offset portion being disposed immediately below and in the closed position of the hinge abutting against the lower edge of said strap.

6. A separable suspension-hinge comprising, in combination, an outer member or strap having basal end-portions united by an intermediate outward bend, said bend having an oblique inward depression on its upper edge, and a lower member or hook having a basal lower end-portion adapted to be secured to a sash and surmounted, in the order named, by an outwardly oflset portion, an upright portion, a horizontal portion of width substantially equal to the width of said depression, and a downwardly hooked end-portion having an oblique lower surface, whereby said hook is rendered disengageable from said strap by a vertical movement when the sash has been opened until the heel of said offset portion is in position to slide by the outer face of said bend of the strap, but in no other position.

7. A separable suspension-hinge compris ing, in combination, an upper member or strap having basal end-portions united by an intermediate outward bend, such bend having an oblique inward depression on its upper edge, and a lower member or hook having a basal lower end-portion adapted to be secured to a sash and surmounted, in the order named, by an outwardly offset portion, an upright portion, a horizontal portion of width substantially equal to the width of said depression, and a downwardly hooked end-portion having an oblique lower surface, whereby said hook is rendered disengageable fro-m said strap by a vertical move ment when the sash has been opened until the heel of said offset is in position to slide by the outer face of said bend of the strap, the lower surface of said hooked end of the strap in said last named position standing substantially vertical and the outer face thereof approaching the surface of the sashframe, whereby on any further opening movement the hinge becomes again inseparable.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of August, 1908.

. RUDOLPH o. WINTER.

WVitnesses:

GEORGE VVnrMoRn CoLLns, JAS. L. NARNns.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3439378 *Jul 5, 1966Apr 22, 1969Cole Mfg CoHinge
US6513196Jun 22, 2001Feb 4, 2003Maytag CorporationTop cover hinge and method for using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification16/268, 70/DIG.590, 70/466
Cooperative ClassificationE05D15/00, Y10S70/59