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Publication numberUS1075898 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1913
Filing dateMay 3, 1912
Priority dateMay 3, 1912
Publication numberUS 1075898 A, US 1075898A, US-A-1075898, US1075898 A, US1075898A
InventorsJoseph H Champ, Theodore H Schutt
Original AssigneeBishop Babcock Becker Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid-dispensing device.
US 1075898 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. H. CHAMP & T. H. SGHUTT.

LIQUID DISPENSING DEVICE.

. APPLICATION FILED MAY 3, 1912.

L75 898 Patented Oct. 14, 1913. I 3 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

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LIQUID DISPENSING DEVICE.

APPLIOATIONIILED MAY3,1912.

1 75,898, Patented Oct. 14, 1913.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

bY ZUP INLET- VV NELSSE$= ATTORNEY J. H. CHAMP e": T. H. SGHUTT.

LIQUID DISPENSING DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 3, 1912.

Lwfi sga, Patented Oct. 14, 1913.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

A TTOENY- d'OSEPH H. CHAMP AND THEODORE H. SCHUT'I',

OF CLEVELAND, OHIO, ASSIGNOBS TQ THE BISHOP-BABCOCK-BEGKER COMPANY, OF CLEVELAND, OHIO, A CORPORATIOI OF OHIO.

LIQUID-DISPENSING DEVICE.

I Specification of Letters Patent.

Patentedflct. 1d, 1913.

Application filed May 3, 1912. Serial No. 694,923.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, JOSEPH H. CHAMP and THEODORE H. SCHUTT, citizens of the United States, and residents of Cleveland, county of Cuyahoga, and State of Ohio, have jointly invented a new and useful Improvement in Liquid-Dispensing Devices, of which the following is aspeclfication, the principle of the invention being herein explained and the best mode in which we have contemplated applying that principle, so as to distinguish it from other inventions.

The present improved apparatus, while generally adaptable to the dispensing of liquids, is more especially designed with regard to the dispensing of syrups and the like, as at soda fountains;

The object of the invention is to provide a simple and automatically operable device that when the faucet handle isturned will discharge a predetermined, or measured, quantity of the syrup or other liquid.

A further object is to provide means for eliminating the dripping, which is an annoying incident to the operation of such faucets as at present constructed.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, the invention, then, consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims. v

The annexed drawings and the following description set forth in detail certain mechanisms embodying the invention,

such disclosed means constituting, however, but several of the various mechanlcal forms in Whigh the principle of the invention may be use In said annexed drawings :Figure 1 is a central vertical section of a device or apparatus embodying our present improvements; Figs. 2, 3 and 4 are transverse sectional views of such device taken on planes indicated by the correspondingly numbered lines on Fig. 1; Fig. 5 is a view corresponding to Fig. 1, but showing a modification in the construction of the device; Figs. 6 and Z are transverse sectional views of such dejust described.

vice taken on planes indicated by the corre-v spondingly numbered-lines on Fig. 5.; Fig. 8 isa view similar to Fig. 1, but illustrating yet another modification in the construction of the device; and Figs. 9, 10 and 11 are transverse sectional views of such device taken on planes indicated by the correspondingly numbered lines on Fig. 8.

The syrup isdesigned to be supplied to the dispensing device, which forms an object of present interest, under suitable pressure, and it is immaterial whether this pressure is secured by gravity, that is, by having the supply tank at a relatively higher elevation than the dispensing apparatus, or whether it be secured by placing such tank under' air or other gaseous pressure. The device itself, having reference to the constructional form illustrated-in Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive,

comprises primarily a cylindrical chamber 1 having an inlet connection 2 for the supply thereto of syrup from a source such as Chamber 1 is preferably vertically disposed and within it is reciprocably held a piston 3 of such weight as to normally sink to the bottom of the chamber, or rather into contact with an adjustable stop 4: mounted in such bottom, whereby the downward movement of the piston may be regulated. Provision is made, however, that under no circumstances shall the piston entirely close connection across the bottom of the chamber between the inlet opening 2 previously referred to, and a second opening 5 that is connected with a by-pass 6 leading to a valve casing 7 at a point conveniently located above the piston chamber. Such valve casing is adapted to receive a valve plug 8 of familiar tapered form, operable by a handle 9, and constitutes the dispensing faucet. Valve plug 8 is provided with a central passage 10 having apertures or ports 11 and 12, adapted in one position (that shown in Fig. 1) to aiford free communication the piston chamber 1 and the by-pass 6, thus equalizing the pressure on both sides of the piston so that the latter will drop to the between the upper portion of r bottom of the chamber by reason of its weight. The portion of the chamber above such piston is thereupon, of course, filled with syrup which is admitted thereto through the by-pass. Other ports 13 and 14 in the valve plug serve, in a position of the latter angularly related to the position just described, to connect the upper portion of the piston chamber 1 with the discharge opening or mouth 15 of the faucet, the connection with the by-pass 6 being simultaneously closed. In this last-described position of the valve plug, the pressure on the upper side of the piston is, of course, relieved so that the force of the syrup on the underside thereof raises said piston and causes the syrup in the upper portion of said chamber to flow from the valve and be discharged from the latters mouth. The casing 7 is formed with an opening 24, and in the closed position of the valve plug communication is established between this opening and the discharge mouth 15 by a groove 23 formed in the valve plug. When the valve is in closed position therefore, the discharge mouth is open to atmospheric pressure both from above and below, and consequently any syrup remaining in the discharge mouth will tend to run out instead of gradually dripping from the mouth.

The piston carries a stopper valve 16 on its upper face that is adapted to tightly close the opening 17 in. the upper end of such chamber when the piston is raised, thus making it unnecessary that the piston be tightly fitted in said chamber. Upon restoring the handle 9. of the valve to its normal position, the pressure on the top and bottom of the piston is again equalized and the upper portion of the piston chamber filled with syrup, the quantity being determined by the location of the stop which limits, as before stated, the downward movement of the piston.

In the modification of the construction illustrated in Fig. 5, substantially the same arrangement of piston and by-pass obtains as in the case of the'first described form of the invention, and these parts are correspondingly designated. A more extended discharge tube or mouth-piece 18, however, is provided in connection with the valve that controls the operation of the device, and in addition to the passage in the valve plug and ports for variously connecting such passage, attention is directed to the lateral extension of the port 11 controlling the upper by-pass connection. This lateral extension 19 serves, as the valve plug is being restored to its normal position, toadniit a small quantity of syrup under pressure into the passage 10 in theplug, while the port 14 in the latter is still connected with the discharge 15. This syrup under pressure causes the body of syrup already in the discharge tube .Figs. 8 to 11 inclusive, where again the general arrangement and operation of the parts is the same as in the first described construction, with the addition of a special discharge tube or mouth piece 18. The valve casing 7, however, is provided with an additional connection 20 whereby air maybe brought thereto, and in proper position of the plug 8 be admitted into the discharge opening 15 through grooves 21 and 22 forming passages in the bearing surface of the plug, as shown in Figs. 8 and 9. The disposition of these latter passages is such that the air is admitted in small quantity incidentally to the restoring of the valve to its normal position, the effect being to force out the residual syrup collecting in the discharge tube of the device so that dripping is prevented. It is, of course also undesirable that this syrup should be allowed to collect in said tube, as it will dry and tend to clog up the same.

Other modes of a plying the principle of our invention may e employed instead of the one explained, change being made as regards the mechanism herein disclosed, provided the means stated by any of the following claims or the equivalent of such stated means be employed.

We therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as our invention '1. In apparatus of the class described, the combination of a measuring chamber having an inlet and an outlet at opposite ends;

a' member reciprocable in said chamber and normally positioned at the inlet end thereof; connections normally open for supplying under pressure the liquid to be measured to both ends of said chamber; and valve means adapted to close said connections to the outlet end of said chamber and open the latter to discharge.

2. In apparatus of the class described, the combination of a measuring chamber having an inlet and an outlet at opposite ends;

a piston reciprocable in said chamber and normally positioned at the inlet end thereof; adjustable means for limiting such normal position of said piston; connections normally open for supplying under pressure to both igor'ases combination of a substantially vertically dis- 7 ing to posed measuring chamber having an inlet at its lower end and an outlet at its upper end;

a piston reciprocable in said chamber and normally'held by gravity at the lower end thereof; connections normally open for supplying under pressure to bothends of said chamber the liquid to be measured; and valve means adapted to close/said connections to the upper end of said chamber and open the outlet of the latter to discharge.

4. In apparatus of the class described, the combination of a substantially vertically disposed measuring chamber having an inlet at its lower end and an outlet at its upper end; a piston reciprocable'in said chamber and normally held by gravity at the lower end thereof; an adjustable stop in the bottomof said'chamber adapted to limit such normal position of said piston; connections normally open for supplying under pressure to both ends of said chamber the liquidto be measured; and valve means adapted to close said connections to the upper end of said chamber and open the outlet of the latter to discharge.

5. In apparatus of the classdescribed, the combination of a substantially vertically disposed measuring chamber having an inlet at its lower end and an outlet at its upper end; a piston reciprocable in said chamber and normally held by gravit at the lower end thereof; a valve carried y said piston and adapted to close the outlet of said chamber; connections normally open for supplying under pressure to both ends of said chamber the liquid to be measured; and valve means adapted-to close said connections to the upper end of said chamber and open the outlet of the latter to discharge.

6. In apparatus of the class described, the combination of a measuring. chamber having an inlet and an outlet at opposite ends; a

piston reciprocable in said chamber and'normally positioned at the inlet end thereof; a by-pass connecting the ends of said cham-' ber; and valve means adapted simultaneous'ly to break suchby-passconnection and to open the outlet of said chamber to discharge.

7. In appar tus of'the class described, the combination of a measuring chamber having an inlet and an outlet at opposite ends; a member movable in said cham er and tendremain at the inlet end thereof under equal conditions of pressure at both ends of said chamber; and means adapted to relieve the pressure at the outlet end of said chamber.

.tions to the outlet end of said chamber 8. In apparatus of the class described, the combination of a substantially vertically disposed measuring chamber having an inlet at its lower end and an outlet at its upper end; a by-pass connected to the ends of said chamber; a piston reciprocable in said chamber and normall held by gravity at the lower end thereo and valve means adapted simultaneously to break such by-pass connections and to open the outlet of said chamber to discharge.

9. In apparatus of the class described, the combination of a substantially vertically disposed measuring chamber having an 1n-' let at its lower end and an outlet at its upper end; a by-pass connected to the ends of said chamber; a piston reciprocable in said chamber and normally held by gravity at the lower end thereof; an adjustable stop in the bottom of said chamber adapted to limit such normal position of said piston; and valvemeans adapted simultaneously to break such by-pass connection and to open the outlet of said chamber to discharge.

10. In apparatus of the class described, the combination of a substantially vertically disposed measuring chamber having an inlet at its lower end and an outlet at its upper end; a by-pass connected to the ends of said chamber; a piston reciprocable in said chamber and.v normally held by gravity at the lower end thereof; a valve carried by said piston and adapted to close the outlet of said chamber; and valve means adapted simultaneously to break such by-pass connection and to open the outlet of said chamber to discharge.

11. Inapparatus of the class described, the combination of a substantially vertically disposed measuring chamber. having an inlet at its lower end and an outlet at its upper end; a piston reciprocable in said chamber at the lower and normally held by gravity end thereof; connections normally open for supplying under pressure to both ends of said chamber the liquid to be measured; a discharge tube for dispensing such liquid; valve means adapted to. close said connecsaid chamber and connect the same with said discharge tube; and connections, likewise controlled by said valve means, adapted to admit fluid under pressure to said discharge tube to force out substantially all liquid remaining therein, substantially as described.

12. In apparatus of the class described, the combination of a substantially vertically disposed measuring chamber having an inlet at its lower end and an outlet at its upper end; a piston reciprocable in said chamber and normally held by gravity at the lower end thereof; connections normally open for supplying under pressure to both ends of the liquid to be measured; a

discharge tube for dispensing such liquid;' tube and substantially all liquid is removed a Valve means adapted to close said connections therefrom, substantially as described.

to the outlet end of said chamber and con- Signed by us this 1st day of May, 1912.

nect the same with said discharge tube; and JOSEPH H. CHAMP.

5 ports in said valve means adapted to tempo- THEODORE H. SCHUTT.

rarily connect said discharge tube directly Attested by r with said supply connections, whereby HORACE B. FAY,

liquid under pressure is admitted to said 7 E. T. SARGENT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2704171 *Dec 11, 1950Mar 15, 1955Cole Everett LMotor operated pipetting machine
US2714473 *Nov 13, 1952Aug 2, 1955Best Clarence AToothpaste dispensing cap
US2760690 *Dec 6, 1950Aug 28, 1956Whalcy Ralph SethLiquid measuring and dispensing machine
US2814422 *Apr 5, 1954Nov 26, 1957Jean MercierFluid dispensing equipment
US3212676 *Mar 20, 1963Oct 19, 1965Pyles Ind IncQuantum metering, mixing and dispensing apparatus
US3245585 *Apr 20, 1964Apr 12, 1966Carl Dawson JosephApparatus for adding measured amounts of one or more fluids to other fluids
US3913797 *Feb 11, 1974Oct 21, 1975Baldwin Gegenheimer CorpFluid dispensing system
US4169544 *Sep 19, 1977Oct 2, 1979Satam IndustriesMixing and distributing apparatus for gasoline and oil
US4351354 *Jul 27, 1979Sep 28, 1982Chemie-Anlagenbau Bischofsheim GmbhSupply control apparatus for a mixing chamber
US5328096 *May 12, 1993Jul 12, 1994Xlent Equipment Co.Spray apparatus and method of operation for spraying heavy viscous material
US8079230 *Aug 28, 2006Dec 20, 2011Fbd Partnership, LpFood dispensing machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/148, 222/387, 137/238, 222/389, 222/335, 222/394, 222/318
Cooperative ClassificationB05B15/025, B67D1/07