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Publication numberUS1079836 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1913
Filing dateDec 19, 1912
Publication numberUS 1079836 A, US 1079836A, US-A-1079836, US1079836 A, US1079836A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for boring wells.
US 1079836 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. H. GANPIELD.

APPARATUS FOR BOEING WELLS.

Patented Nov. 25, 1913.

APPLICATION FILED DEG.19,1912,

To (ZZZ whom it may concern :1

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noenn n. seminar, on irbonrnesro'nr, LOUISIANA.

- Y Specification of Letters Iatent. Applicationflled- December 19,1912; jgerlellqo. 737,726.

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Patented Nov. 25, 1913.

Be it known that I, ROGER H. CANFIELD, a citizen of the United States, residing at Mooringsport, in the parish of Caddo and State of Louisiana, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Apparatus for Boring Wells; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

My invention relates to improvements in apparatus for boring wells, and more espe cially to the apparatus used in boring oil or Artesian wells, which apparatus is required often to pass to a considerable depth, and through strata of widely different hardness. and friability.

- The apparatus is intended especially to rovide means, not only for boring the hole itself, but also for preventing the blocking of the wells, occasioned by the rupture of the boring apparatus, and also to enable the operator to recover any portions of the apparatus that may be so broken off in the well. In practice, it fre uently happens that the lower end of the boring appliance is broken ofi, leaving the bit and contiguous parts in the well; and itis generally diflicult, and often impracticable, to recover these broken of? portions. Frequently, when a hard stratum is found at a considerable depth, the apparatus is broken oiilnear the bit end, and the well is blocked or spiked, so as to prevent further boring along the same axis, and it is necessary to abandon the well.

My invention also consists in certain improved means for assembling the parts, and in other novel features, which will be here inafter more fully described and claimed.

Figure 1 shows a central vertical section through the apparatus," the central pipe and bit being shown in elevation, and parts he ing broken away. Fig. 2 shows a portion of the device of Fig. 1, in a similar section, but

on a larger scale. Fig. 3 shows a section along the line 33"fof. Fig. 2, and looking down. Fig.4 shows a section through the screw head towhich the bitis attached,"the parts being shown on a larger scale than in Fig. 1, and the section being taken along the line H of said figure. Fig. 5 shows a cross-section along the line 55 of Fig. L;

and Fig. 6 shows a modified form of lifting ring, fqruse with a solid lifting column.

- ls showlithe bit, secured to the head. 2 by the tapered shank 3 screw-threaded into the tapered'socket 3. Said head is also formed with a recess 4%. The shank of the bit is shouldered as at 4:, to engage the screw- .thread'ed ring 5, whichis screwed into the threads 6 in therecess l t This split ring is provided with tongues 7, engaging. inicorresponding recesses 8 in the opposite nienr her, as shown in- Fig. 5; and the split ring 6 is preferably provided with spanner holes 9, so as to be screwed into place, when desired. The shanln of 'the bit is provided with passages 10, 'opening exterior to the blades at,the lower end, and at the upper end opening intothe chamber 11 in the shank of the bit. .,{;'.[he head 2 is interiorly screw-threaded, asjat 12, to receive the inner pipe 13 and is exteriorly screw-threaded, as at 14, to engage the screw-threads on the coupling 15, into which is screwed the lower end of the outer; iordrill pipe 16. Similar couplings 16 connect, the upper sections of the drill pipe, and the sections. of the inner pipe are connected by couplings 17,through which pass the spacing pins 18 and 19, which spacing pins serve to keep the inner pipe centeredin the drill pipe.

Between the abutting ends of the drill pipe sections, rings 20 are mounted. These rings are loosely mounted in the couplings 16*, but abut against the ends of the pipe sections, as shown most clearly in Figs. 1 and 2. They arefitted loosely on the sections of, the innerpipe 13, butare adapted to engage the ends of the pipe couplings 17 should the inner pipe be pulled through the ring. These rings are slipped over the corresponding section of the inner pipe 13, after it has been put in place, and before the next section of the pipe 16 has been put in place; thus the ring rests on the upper faceof the pipe section immediately below. I

When the next outer pipe section is screwed on, it .will hold the ring in the annular space between the two ends'of the adjacent pipe sections.

It will be noted that the couplings 17 confstitute collars of greater diameter than the .inner diameter of the rings 20; so that if any one of the outer pipe sections 16 is broken, as in the operation of drilling, and it be. desired to remove the broken portion, by simply pullingup on the outer shell or piping 16, the ring just above the broken away portion will be dragged up to engage ioo the corresponding lower shoulder of the coupling 17, just above the same; and after a slight lost motion, the drill end of the apparatus can be pulled up, attached to the entire line of piping.

ice it generally happens that the apparatus breaks near the lower end, it will ordinarily be sufficientto carry the inner line of tubing, with the couplings 8, up through a few lengths of the drill pipe (Sonly; but-this inner line of tubing may be continued up through the entire length of the drill pipe, if desired. 'lhis inner column is preferably made in the form of a tube, or pipe, so that water may be carried down to the drill passing through the head thereof, and through the holes 10, into the chamber being bored. I While Ipreferably use a hollow tube for the inner column, it may be composed of rod sections coupled together by any suitable coupling, such as 17, and secured at its lower end to the head 2,-which head, in that case, would be perforated in the usual way, to permit the passage of'water therethrough.

- In such cases, instead of the solid rings 20,

perforated rings 20 should be used, as shown in Fig. 6. Y

i It will be obvious that various changes might be made in the construction, combination, and arrangement of parts, which could be used without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is l. The combination With a drill piping, of ahead connected thereto; a bit detachably connected to said head and constructed with a shoulder; and a ring carried by said head and adapted toengage Withsaid shoulder to raise the bit, substantially as described. 2. The combination with a drill piping, of a head connected thereto; a bit detachably connected to said head andconstructed with a shoulder; and a split ring detachably connected to said head and adapted to engage with said shoulder to raise the bit, substantially as described.

3. The combination with a drill piping, of a head connected thereto and constructed with a recess; a bit detachably connected to said head and constructed with a shoulder; and a ring fitting within said recess and carried by said head and adapted to engage with said shoulder to raise the bit, substantially as described.

4. The combination with a drill piping, of a head connected thereto and constructed with a recess; a bit detachably connected to said head and constructed with a shoulder; and a split ring screw-threaded on said head within the recess thereof and adapted to engage with said shoulder to raise the bit. substantially as described. I

, 5. The combination with a drill piping, of a head connected thereto and constructed with a recess and a tapered socket; a bit having a tapered shank screw-threaded into said socket, and constructed with an annular shoulder; and a split ring screw-threaded into the head recess and carried by said head and adapted to engage with the bit shoulder to raise the bit, substantially as described.

6. The combination with a drill piping, of

a head connected thereto and constructed with a recess and a tapered sock t; a bit having a tapered shank screw-threaded into said socket, and constructed with an annular shoulder; and a ring comprising sections having inter-engaging tongues and recesses, said ring screw-threaded into the head recess and carried by said head and adapted to engage with the bit shoulder to raise the bit. substantially as described.

, In testimony whereof, 'I afiix my signature, in presence of two witnesses.

ROGER H. CANFIELD. Witnesses:

H. T, WnAron, C; T. GARDNER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2548734 *Nov 5, 1947Apr 10, 1951Scully Signal CoInsertable vent pipe
US2650111 *Oct 29, 1948Aug 25, 1953Kaiser Edward WExpansion joint enclosure
US3231032 *Apr 5, 1960Jan 25, 1966Atlas Copco AbApparatus for drilling in earth covered rock
US6374916 *Oct 25, 1999Apr 23, 2002Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Method and apparatus for stiffening an output shaft on a cutting tool assembly
US7195081 *Apr 3, 2006Mar 27, 2007Alwag Tunnelausbau Gesellschaft M.B.H.Method and device for boring holes in soil or rock
Classifications
U.S. Classification279/89, 279/101, 285/123.3, 175/421, 285/123.1, 175/320
International ClassificationE21B17/04
Cooperative ClassificationE21B17/04
European ClassificationE21B17/04