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Publication numberUS1083243 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1913
Filing dateOct 9, 1912
Priority dateOct 9, 1912
Publication numberUS 1083243 A, US 1083243A, US-A-1083243, US1083243 A, US1083243A
InventorsWilliam C Edwards Jr
Original AssigneeWilliam C Edwards Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ready-to-lay composition roofing.
US 1083243 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. O. EDWARDS, JR.

READY TO LAY COMPOSITION ROOFING.

APPLICATION FILED 00129. 1912.

Patented Dec. 30, 1913.

2 BHEET S-SHEET 1.

0. EDWARD, JR. READY TO LAY COMPOSITION ROOFING.

APPLICATION P'ILED 0013.9, 1912.

Patented Dec. 30, 1913.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

INVENTEIR WITNESSES WILLIAM c. nnwnnns, an, or K NSAS CITY, rssounr.

I BEAIDY-TO-LAY COMPOSITION ROOFING.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 30, 1913;

Application filed October '9, 1912. I Serial No. 724,743.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, WILLIAM G. EDWARDS, Jr., -a citizen of the United States of America, .residing at Kansas City, the county of Jackson and State of Missouri, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Readyto-Lay Composition Roofing; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification. The expression ready to lay roofing is applied by me to a built up composition com posed of one or more layers of such body materials as wool felt, asbestos felt, canvas, burlap, paper and the like, the said layers being saturated and'cemented together by the agency of some cementitious material such as asphalt, pitch, tar, etc. Such roofing being factory fabricated, can be produced of an even grade and of high character. The value of this type of roofing lies in the fact that it is easily handled and laid by unskilled mechanics, and can be secured from stock. However ready to lay roofings are open to the serious objection that they are not continuous in structure. Where the sheets are lapped at sides and ends, and nailed to the roof sheathing, in the course of time, cracks or openings appear in the lap through which water penetrates causing damage and loss. Also ready to lay roofing requires about ten per cent. extra material per square in order to form the said lap, which therefore increases the cost a corresponding. amount. The present type of lap also forms a ridge on the roof surface obsructing the free flow of the water.

The principal objects of this invention are: The factory fabrication of roofing materials in long strips, adapted to be transported in'rolls and applied to roof surfaces to produce a continuous roofing surface. The fabrication of ready to lay roofing in strips or sheets having a reinforcing flap at each edge. To secure a flat continuous joint between adjacent strips of ready to lay roofing materials. To effect a saving in the quantity of material necessary to cover a surface by doing away with the present waste of material at the lap. To form a joint between adjacent sheets of ready to lay roofing, which joint will be stronger and more waterproof than the body of the rooflng sheet. 1 1

The invention consists'in the novel construction and combination of parts such as Wlll be first fully described and then specifically pointed out in the claims;

In the drawings, Figure 1. shows a vertical sectional view taken through my improved three'ply ready to lay roofing. Fig. 2. shows a vertical sectional view taken throughmy improved four ply ready to lay roofing. Fig. 3. shows a vertical sectional view taken through my improved five ply ready to lay roofing. Fig. 4.. shows a vertical sectional view taken through the joint of adjacent sheets of my four ply roofing seen in Fig. 2. Fig. 5. shows a vertical sectional view taken through the joint of adjacent sheets of my five ply roofing seen in Fig. 3. Fig. 6. shows a vertical sectional view taken through the joint of adjacent sheets of my two ply roofing, when formed like the two upper ply seen in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. Fig. 7 shows a perspective view of a fragmentary portion of a roof surface covered with my three plyready to lay roofing seen in Fig. 1. showing the method of forming the continuous joint between adjacent sheets of said roofing.

Similar numerals of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the figures of the drawings.

Referring to Fig. 1. Layers of wool felt or similar body material, 10, 12 and 13 are seen joined together by films of a cementitious material, 11, such as asphalt. The base layer 10 and the middle layer 12 are offset with respect to each other to form at opposite edges, the extended portions 14.-15 and 16--17 of said base and middle layers. The upper layer 13 extends beyond the edge 14.-18 of the middlelayer 12 to form an under flap portion 18-20; also at the op posite edge, an upper flap portion 19-21 of said upper layer .3. is formed, said flap being free from the marginal portion 1719 of the middle layer. This upper layer may be covered with a coating'22 of a cementitious substanceinto which may be incorporated anydesired surface material such as gravel, feldspar, quartz, mica, etc. Between the points 20 and 23 however such coating 22 is preferably bmitted. The office of the extended portions 14-915 and 16-17 of the base and middle layers and of the under flap 18 .-20 and upper flap 19-21 of titious coating 11 is applied to the upper surface of this layer 12 of sheet B between the points 17 and 19, the under flap 18- 20 of the upper layer 13 of the sheet A is then pressed firmly down upon the coated parts 1719 of sheet B. A cementitious coating 11' is next applied to the upper surface of layer 13 of sheet A between the points 20-23 and the upper flap 1921 of the upper layer 13 of the sheet B is pressed firmly down upon said coated parts 2023 of the upper layer 13 of sheet A, and the edge 21 is coated with a-cementitious coating 11", thus completing the formation of a continuous joint between the sheets A and B. As seen in Fig. 7. in the upper part thereof, a portion of the layer 12 of sheet B between the points 17 and 19 is wholly removed to expose'the coating 1 1 and the parts 14.15 of the base layer 10 of sheet A. The other parts'used to form the joint are exposed for a full understanding of the methods of forming the joint. At 25 will be seen a nailhead, the said nail being driven through the parts 13 and 10 of sheet A, and the part 12 of sheet B, down and into the sheathing 24:.

In Figs. 2 and 4, the middle layer is formed as in Fig. 1, but with two layers- 12 cemented together at 11. The base layer likewise is formed as in Fig. 1'. but-given a protective coating 11 over its under surface.

In Figs. 3 and 5, the middle layer is formed identical to the'middle layer in Fig.

2. just described. .The base layer being composed :of two layers of 10 cemented to.-

gether at 11. As will be seen by reference to the various cross-sections, by meansof my invention a continuous joint is formed between adjacent sheets of ready to lay roofing:

Since the base and middle layers are formed of equal area and ofiset the distance 14-15, there is no loss of material at the joint except that required to form the upper flap 1921'. The upper flap 19-21 of sheet B does not appreciably thicken the roofing at the joint, so that for all practical purposes a flat. joint is secured. The upper flap 1921 and, under flap 1820 cover the joint between the abuttin ends of the middle layers, 12. If desired the parts 1719 and 1820 can be lengthened so that both the upper flap 1921 and-underflap 182 0 will cover the joint between the abutting versely or longitudinally-with the adjacent.

roofing sheets.

My invention'is. applicable to other uses than roofing, being valuable in such other uses as for instance the waterproofing of foundations, tunnels and linings.

Such other modifications may be employed as are within the scope of the appended claims.

Having described my invention what I now claim as new and desine' to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A ready to lay roofing comprising a built up composition composed of upper, middle and baselayers of body materials, cementitiously bonded together over a major portion of their surfaces, the said base and middle layers being offset, with respect to each other, to form at opposite edges extended portions of said base and middle layers; the upper layer covering both base and middle layers, the edges of said upper layer comprising free flap portions, unattached to said under layers.

2. In a roofing structure composed of adjacent sheets A and B of built up ready to lay roofing, each sheet comprising la ers of body materials,-cementitiously bonde to-- gether over a major, portion of their surfaces, the upper body layer bein extended a short distance beyond one e ge of the under layer to form an under fla portion of said upper body layer, the said upper' layer being uncemented to a marginal portion of the under layer at the opposite edge thereby forming an upper flap portion of said upper body layer; a continuous joint.

being formed between said sheets of roofing, in whichthe under layer of sheet B abuts the under layer of sheet A, the under flap of sheet A covering. the cementitiously coated marginal edge ortion of the under layer of sheet B, sai under flap portion of sheet A being cementitiously coated andcovered by the u per flap portion of sheet B.

3. In a roofing structure composed of adjacent sheets A and B of built up ready to lay roofin each sheet comprising upper,

middle an base layers of body materials, cementitiously bonded .together over a major portion of their surfaces, the said base and middle layers being ofi'set with respect to each other to form, at opposite edges, ex-' tended portions of said base and middle layers, the said 11 per layer being extended a short distance eyond one edge of said middle layer to form an upper flap portion of said upper layer, and said upper and middle layers at the opposite edge being uncemented together, thereby forming an upper flap portion of said upper body layer; a continuous joint being formed between said sheets of roofing, in which the extended portion of the middle layer of sheet 13 abuts the middle layer of sheet A and covers the cementitiously coated extended sheet coate portion of th under flap portio tended portion 0 B, and the upper layer of sheet B (1 under flap portion of sheet A.

" Witnesses W. H. Loomis, J r., J. C. SEARLEB.

e base layer of sheet A, the n of the upper layer of A covers the cementitiously coated exis f the middle layer of sheet flap portion of the upper covers the cemen-titiously 'Correctlon in Letters Patent No. 1,083,243.

It is hereby certified that in Letters Patent No. 1,0E !,243, granted December 30, 1913, upon the application of William C. Edwards, Jr., of Kansas City,

Missouri, for an improvement in Ready-To-Imy Composition Roofing, an error appears in the printed specification requiring correction as follows: Page 3, line 3,

for the word upper read under; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Oflice.

Signed and sealed this 20th day of January, A. D., 19 14.

[emu] J. T. NEWTON,

Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3079730 *Mar 4, 1958Mar 5, 1963Allied Chem & Dye CorpRoof deck structure having a continuous vapor barrier and composite insulating element therefor
US3209502 *Jun 7, 1961Oct 5, 1965Allied ChemInsulating roof deck structure
US3505770 *Nov 25, 1968Apr 14, 1970Phillips Petroleum CoBuilding construction
US4937995 *Jun 16, 1988Jul 3, 1990Carlisle CorporationNoninvasively identifiable membrane roof system
US7578108 *Dec 20, 2007Aug 25, 2009Lief Eric SwansonTop down trap lock shingle system for roofs
US20040241037 *Jun 16, 2004Dec 2, 2004Wu Ming H.Beta titanium compositions and methods of manufacture thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/539, 52/540
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0864