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Publication numberUS1087092 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1914
Filing dateNov 27, 1911
Priority dateNov 27, 1911
Publication numberUS 1087092 A, US 1087092A, US-A-1087092, US1087092 A, US1087092A
InventorsJohn D Stingle
Original AssigneeJohn D Stingle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Staple-holder.
US 1087092 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J D. STINGLE.

STAPLE HOLDER.

APPLIGATION FILED NOV. 27, 1911.

1,087,092. Patented Feb. 10, 1914.

J I fi n "iii Jalmfi'il'izgle,

Inventor Attorneys s'rarns FATE JOHN D. STINGLE, F PINE VILLAGE, INDIANA.

STAPLE-HOLDER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed November 27, 1911.

, To all whom it may concern Be it known that 1, JOHN D. STINGLE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Pine Village, in the county of Warren and State of Indiana, have invented a new and useful Staple-Holder, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to staple holders,

its principal object being to provide a simple and compact tool of this type in which a staple can be easily placed, said staple, while in position, being held against spreading, wllzlile being driven into hard wood or the li e.

V A further object is to provide means for so holding a staple as to prevent it from becoming displaced while engaging a wire being pushed, by means of the tool, into position on a post or the like.

A further object is to provide a holder which can be easily released from the staple after said staple has been driven a predetermined distance into a post or the like.

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention resides in the combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter described and claimed it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of the invent-ion herein disclosed can be made within the scope of what is claimed, without depart ing from the spirit of the invention.

In the accompanying drawings the preferred form of the invention has been shown.

In said drawings: Figure 1 is a perspec tive view of the tool in use. Fig. 2 is a section through the head of the tool, the position of the staple therein being indicated by dotted lines. Fig. 3 is a vertical'transverse section through the head. Fig. 4 is a section on line AB Fig. 3. Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the head inverted and with the retaining spring removed.

Referring to the figures by characters of reference 1 designates the head of the tool and from which a handle 2 extends, said head having an extension 3 constituting a striking face adapted to receive the impact of a hammer or the like in driving a staple. A recess 4 extends into the head at a point opposite the striking face of the extension 3 and has a U-shaped channel 5 in its walls adapted to receive the crown portion and portions of the arms of a staple, said staple,

when seated within the channel, having its pointed ends projecting some distances beyond the recessed end of the head.

One side of the head 1 is recessed as at 6 to receive a leaf spring 7 secured, at one end, within the recess while its other end normally closes one side of the recess 4: and carries a retaining block 8 adapted to fit within the recess 4. The innermost portion of this block is in the form of a rounded shoulder 9 slightly inclined transversely, as shown in Fig. 3, and the exposed side face of the block is rounded toward the outer side of the free end portion of spring 7 so as to produce a blunt edge 10.

The normal position of the spring 7 has been illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3 and, as

shown in Fig. 3, the block 8 normally projects into the space partly surrounded by the groove or channel 5. When it is desired to insert a staple into the holder the crown or intermediate portion of said staple is inserted into the open ends of the channel and then pushed inwardly against the rounded face of the block 8. Said block will thus be shifted laterally out of the path of the staple until the crown portion of the staple is brought against the innermost portion of the channel 5 whereupon block 8 will spring back to its normal position, thereby holding the staple within the channel and with its ends projecting out of the head, as indicated at S in Fig. 1. With the staple thus positioned it can be placed in engagement with a wire such as shown at W and the wire pushed to a predetermined position on a post or the like, the arms of the staple thus acting as a fork to hold the wire properly assembled with the staple during this operation. As soon as the wire and staple have been brought to the point where the wire is to be fastened, the face of the extension 3 is struck by a hammer and the projecting ends of the staple S are thus driven into the post or the like. The head is then pulled away from the staple and, as the shoulder 9 is inclined transversely, this will result in the lateral shifting of the block 8. The tool is thus released from the staple and can be withdrawn therefrom after which the staple can be hit directly with the hammer and driven into the wood as far as desired.

It will be apparent that by means of the tool herein described staples can be held properly and wires can be moved into positions where they are to be fastened, without danger of injuring the hands of the oper ator, this being more especially noticeable where the device is used in securing barb wires in place.

Importance is attached to the fact that the staple is held in the head in a plane with or parallel to the longitudinal axis of the handle so that it is thus possible to shift the wire W readily when engaged by the ends of the staple in the holder.

What is claimed is l. A staple holder including a hammer head having a recess extending into one end thereof, the inner end of the recess being rounded to conform with the contour of the crown or intermediate portion of the staple and there being a continuous staple receiving channel formed within the sides and inner end wall of the recess, the walls of the channel constituting the sole means for hold; ing a staple against lateral displacement relative to the head, a spring secured at one side to the head, and a retaining block extending from the free end portion of the spring and normally extending into the head from one side thereof, said block being arranged to fit snugly against the sides and crown portion of an inserted staple and to coeperate with the grooved portion of the head to hold the staple against movement in the recess.

2. A staple holder including a hammer head having a recess extending into one end thereof and the inner end of which is rounded to conform with the contour of the crown or intermediate portion of a staple, there being a continuous staple receiving channel formed within the sides and inner end wall of the recess, the walls of the channel constituting the sole means for holding a staple against lateral displacement relative to the head, there being a recess in one side of the head and of the same width as the recess in the end of the head, the two recesses communicating, a spring secured at one end to the head and seated in the side recess, the outer end of the spring being normally flush with the corresponding face of the head, and a retaining block upon one side of the spring and normally extending into the recess in the end of the head, said block hav ing a transversely inclined arcuate shoulder adapted to engage the inner surface of the crown portion of a staple seated in the channel, one side of the block being beveled from said shoulder toward the free end of the spring, said block being arranged, when in normal position, to extend entirely across the space bounded by the staple.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own, I have hereto aiiiXed my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

JOHN D. STINGLE. Witnesses JAMES C. Jones, DANIEL A. Mnssnnn.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2709938 *Oct 16, 1952Jun 7, 1955Maximilian J SchmidPlasterers' wire locking hammer
US2757438 *Dec 8, 1951Aug 7, 1956United Aircraft CorpApparatus for forming stator rings
US2808641 *Mar 22, 1955Oct 8, 1957Carlos L R SandellTool for freeing frozen hydraulic valve lifters from their cylinders
US4903882 *Jan 7, 1988Feb 27, 1990Long Gregory TDriving tool for an electrical staple
US5244328 *Mar 11, 1992Sep 14, 1993Higgins James AAnti-splitting device
US8434563Feb 24, 2011May 7, 2013Schiller Grounds Care, Inc.Device for cultivating soil or brushing debris
US8496069Sep 14, 2012Jul 30, 2013Schiller Grounds Care, Inc.Device for cultivating soil or brushing debris having a drive shaft and plurality of gears
Classifications
U.S. Classification7/117, 227/147, 7/143, 29/275, 81/23, 227/156
Cooperative ClassificationB25F1/006