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Publication numberUS1087845 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 17, 1914
Filing dateJul 16, 1913
Priority dateJul 16, 1913
Publication numberUS 1087845 A, US 1087845A, US-A-1087845, US1087845 A, US1087845A
InventorsJames H Stevens
Original AssigneeJames H Stevens
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Salvarsan-needle.
US 1087845 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. H. STEVENS. SALVARSAN NEEDLE.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 16, 1913 1,087,845., Patented Feb. 17, 1914.

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Inventor.

-' James H. STevens,

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COLUMBIA PLANbGRAPH co., WASHINGTON. D4 4:.

FTQE.

JAMES H. STEVENS, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

SALVARSAN-NEEDLE.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, JAMES H. STEVENS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Boston, county of Suffolk, State of Massachusetts, have invented an Improvement in Salvarsan-Needles, of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawing, is a specification, like characters on the drawing representing like parts.

This invention relates to so-called salvarsan needles which are used for puncturing the vein of a person for the purpose of introducing a fluid thereinto and it has particular reference to a cannula needle of this type.

The object of the invention is to provide a novel construction by which the desired fluid can be injected into the vein without danger that any air will be sucked through the needle into the vein during this operation.

I will first describe some selected embodiments of my invention from which the principle thereof will be readily ascertained and T will then point out the novel features of the invention in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings, Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view through a needle embodying my invention showing the parts in position for being inserted into the vein. Fig. 2 is a similar section showing the cannula moved forward into position to protect the point of the needle, which is the position of the parts when the fluid is being inserted. Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view showing a different embodiment of the invention. Fig. 4 is a section on the line w09, Fig. 3.

The needle herein illustrated comprises a tubular sheath 1 having a point 2 and cutting edge 3 at one end and blunt ended cannula 4t which is slidably mounted in the sheath and is provided with an axial duct 5 through which the liquid is introduced into the vein. The cannula is connected to a tube 6 leading to the receptacle or other apparatus containing the fluid tobe injected, such apparatus not being shown herein because it may be of any approved type and forms no part of the present invention. The cannula i is of such length that when it is fully inserted into the sheath the blunt end 7 thereof will extend slightly beyond the point 2 of the sheath and thus protect the latter.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed July 16, 1913.

Patented Feb. TW, T214.

Serial No. 779,256.

position shown in Fig. 2 thereby protecting the point 2 and cutting edge 3 so as to make it impossible for the physician to accidentally puncture the wall of the vein, and then the fluid is allowed to flow into the vein through the duct 5 of the cannula.

In the use of needles of this type it is extremely important that no air should be allowed to enter the vein for such an occurrence produces disastrous effects upon the patient. As stated above it is the object of my invention to provide a novel needle of this type which is provided with means that will exclude the possibility of air entering between the sheath and the cannula thus permitting the needle to be used with no danger of introducing any air into the vein. The drawings show the preferred construc tion by which this object is accomplished and on referring to them it will be seen that the rear or base end of the sheath 1 is provided with an enlarged. chamber 8 and that the rear end of the cannula is provided with the enlarged portion 9 which accurately fits the chamber 8. The sheath is also provided with a shoulder 10 at the outer end of the chamber 8 and the cannula l is provided with a cooperating shoulder 11 which is so situated that it will engage the shoulder 10 when the cannula is fully inserted into the sheath. The portion 9 of the cannula is made so as to accurately it the interior wall of the chamber 8, thereby providing an air tight joint between the cannula and the sheath.

Means are provided for locking the cannula in either its retracted or projected position and in Figs. 1 and 2 this means is shown as a set screw 12 screwed into the wall of the chamber 8 and adapted to engage the portion 9 of the cannula. In Figs. 3 and i I have shown a slightly different construction wherein a pinion 13 is journaled in the sheath and is adapted to engage annular teeth lt formed on the end of the cannula. The pinion 13 is mounted on a shaft 15 pro vided with a thumb piece 16 by which it may be turned.

In using the device the physician first withdraws the cannula so as to uncover the cutting edge 3 and point 2 of the sheath as shown in Fig. 1 and then locks the cannula in such position. The fiuid is then allowed to flow from the apparatus or reservoir until all air is expelled from the tube 6, duct 5 and chamber 8. If desired, the needle may be inserted into a body of fiuid when the cannula is withdrawn so that the act of withdrawing the cannula will fill the cham ber .S with the fluid. In any event, after all air has been expelled from the ducts and chambers in the needle then the needle is inserted into the vein of the patient and as soon as blood appears in the glass-indicating tube of the apparatus, the set screw 12 is loosened and the cannula is pushed for ward into the position shown in Fig. 2 thereby protecting the point 2 and cutting edge 3 of the needle. lVhen the cannula is in this position it obviates the possibility of the wall 01" the vein being punctured by the needle during the subsequent manipulation of the device. As soon as the cannula has been pushed forward into the position shown in Fig. 2 the set-screw 12 is tightened and the fluid to be inserted into the vein is allowed to fiow through the tube (3 and duct- 5 of the cannula and when a sufiicient amount of fluid has been injected, the needle is withdrawn. When the cannula is in its forward position as shown in Fig. 2 the engagement of the shoulders 10 and 11 together with the snug fit between the part 9 of the cannula and the interior wall of the chamber 8 maize an air tight joint which prevents any air from being sucked into the vein between the cannula and sheath.

In using the device shown in Figs. 3 and 1, the operator withdraws the cannula by turning the thumb wheel 16 and then holding the cannula in its withdrawn position by means of the thumb wheel until the needle is inserted into the vein when the cannula is advanced by turning the thumb wheel and is held in its advanced position by applying pressure to the thumb wheel. In other respects the invention shown in Figs. 3 and 4t is similar to that described in Figs. 1 and 2.

While I have illustrated one embodiment of my invention, yet I do not wish to be limited to the constructional features shown.

Having fully described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. In a salvarsan needle, the combination with a sheath having a pointed end presenting a cutting edge and also having an enlarged chamber at its rear end, of a bluntended cannula slidable in said sheath and having at its rear end a portion of enlarged diameter which accurately fits the chamber in the sheath and constitutes an air-tight joint between the sheath and the cannula which will prevent any air from being sucked into the vein through the needle.

2. In a salvarsan needle, the combination with a sheath having a pointed end presenting a cutting edge and also having an enlarged chamber at its rear end and a shoulder at the outer end of the chamber, of a bluntended cannula slidable in said sheath and having at its rear end a portion of enlarged diameter which accurately fits the chamber in the sheath and also having a shoulder sition to protect the point of the sheath when the cannula is moved forward into position to protect the point of the sheath whereby an air tight joint will be presented which will prevent air from being sucked into the vein through the needle.

3. In a salvarsan needle the combination with a sheath having a pointed end and presenting a cutting edge and also having an enlarged chamber at its rear end, of a bluntended cannula slidable in said sheath and having at its rear end a portion of enlarged diameter which accurately fits the chamber in the sheath whereby when the needle has been inserted into the vein and the cannula has been moved forward to protect the point of the sheath an air-tight joint is presented between the sheath and the cannula which will prevent any air from being sucked into the vein through the needle, and means to lock the cannula in either of its two.positions.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesse JAMES H. STEVENS.

\Vitnesses LOUIS 0. SMITH, Tnonas J. DRUMMOND.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents Washington, D. G.

It is hereby certified that in Letters Patent No. 1,087,815, granted February 17, 1914, upon the application of James H. Stevens, of Boston, Massachusetts, for an improvement in Salvarsan-Needles, an error appears in the printed specification requiring correction as follows: Page 2, line 7 9, for the Words sition to protect the point read which engages the shoulder; and that the said Letters Patent should be read With this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Olfice.

Signed and sealed this 31st day of March, A. 1)., 1914.

J. T.- NEWTON,

[SEAL] Acting Commissioner of Patente.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/159
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/0113