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Publication numberUS1088187 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1914
Filing dateJun 10, 1913
Priority dateJun 10, 1913
Publication numberUS 1088187 A, US 1088187A, US-A-1088187, US1088187 A, US1088187A
InventorsHans Eduard Theisen
Original AssigneeHans Eduard Theisen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid-separator.
US 1088187 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v a 3M6Huamd/ H. ELTHEISEN. L Q SEPARATIOR. APPLIUA o FILED JUNE 10, 1913.

1,088,1 87. Patented Feb. 24, 1914.

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H. E. THEISEN. LIQUID SEPARATOR.' APPLIOATION FILED JUNE 10, 1913.

1,088,187. Patented Feb. 24, 191

B SHEETS-SHEET 2.

H. E. THEISEN. LIQUID SEPARATOR.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 10, 1913.

1 ,088,1 87. I Patented Feb. 24, 191 i 3 SHEET8-SEEET 3.

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HANS EDUAED THEISEN, 0F MUNICH, GERMANY.

LEQUlIlD-SEPARATOR.

to provide a simply constructed apparatus by means of which an effective separation of the liquid from the gasis secured.

The invention is illustratively exemplified in the accompanying drawing, wherein- Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view of one form' of the invention; Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan view of one of the partitions employed in the construction of the device; Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view thereof Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view of a modified form of separator; and Fig. 5 is a part elevational and part sectional View of a plant having the separator installed therein.

In all forms of the invention shown in the drawings, the separator is soconstructed that the current of gas from which the liquid is to be separated, flows in a tortuous path contacting alternately with contact and perforated portions of the partitions within the separator. By this arrangement a most effective separating action results, and by the time the gas reaches the emission side of the separator, it has been freed of substantially all its liquid content.

Referring by reference characters to the drawings, and particularly to Fig. 1 thereof, the character a denotes a preferably cylindrical casing or container such as a stand pipe, which may have its lower end open and capable of being closed by a water seal a. The gas admission opening is designated 7) and the outflow or emission opening for the gas, (after separation of the liquid therefrom) is designated 0. Ar-

ranged within the stand pipe at and extending' longitudinally thereof is a series of successive partitions d, d (Z and 01*, which divide the interior of the stand pipe a into a plurality of compartments 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14. Each of the partitions d to d" includes a contact portion and .a perforated portion, the partitions, being so arranged Specification oi Letters Patent.

Application filed June-10, 1913. Serial No. 772,821.

Patented rep. 2a, acre.

within the stand pipe that the contact and perforated parts, respectively, of the partitions are in staggered relation to each other,

z. e. the contact part of one partition is opposite the perforated part of an adjacentpartition and vice versa. From Fig.1 it will be noted that the gas entering the stand pipe through the admission port 7) impacts against the contact art of the partition (2 whereby a considera le portion of the dirty watercarried by the stream of'gas is precipitated to the bottom of pipe a. The contact part of partition (5' deflects the gas stream from its initial course, causing it to flow in compartment- 10 in the direction of the arrow therein. The gas then reaches and flows through the perforations f in partition d whereby it is freed from a further portlon of its liquid content. After issuing through the perforations f in the partition d it impacts against the contact part of partition d by which it is deflected and caused to flow downwardly in the compartment 11, whence it flows through the perforations f in partition 03 against the contact part of partition'd The stream of gas is again deflected and caused to fiow upwardly in the compartment 12 until it reaches and passes through the perforations f in the partition (Z As the gas emerges from-the perforations f it impacts against the contact portion of partition cl being deflected downwardly in compartment 13, then flowing through the perforations f in partition d" and upwardly in compartment 14 and out through the outflow passage c. Each time the gas impacts against a contact part'of a partition, and flows through a series of perforations, it is freed of some of its liquid content, so that by the time the stream of gas passes out through the emission ort c it is practically entirely dehydrated. he area of each orifice or perforation in each partition is such that the total area of all the-orifices is somewhat less than the cross sectional area of the several compartments through which the gas flows in alternate directions. It will also be noted that the orifices are preferablydifferently formed, and of different areas, in the several partitions, as I have found this expedient to be very effective in producing satisfactory results.

In Figs. 2 and 3 I have shown a modified form of perforation f in one of the partitions. The orifice is shaped somewhat like a jet or nozzle, and when the gas flows through the orifices in the direction of the turalmodification, the separator may have the additional function of cutting off the supply of gas, as desired, and in Fig. 4 I have illustrated one form in which these two functions are-present in the apparatus.

The stand pipe (4", having the admission port I), the admission port a and the partitions d" provided with the perforations f", ha arranged therein an imperforate depending baflle wall m shorter than the partitions and positioned adjacent the emission port 0*. The bottom of the stand pipe rests in a casing or trough 25, provided with a dam h, so that during normal operation the level of the liquid in the trough may be maintained at about the line i 2'. Slidable in the vertical wall of the casing 25 1s a gate is designed to prevent the liquid from flowing over-the dam h, When the device is to be used to cut off the supply of gas to the service system, the gate is is lowered whereby the level of liquid in the casing 25 is caused to rise to the line Z, Z, and seal the lower end of the baffle wall m. The gas can thus pass through the perforated walls (Z until 1t reaches the baflie wall m, where its flow is stopped, and in this way all mechanical valves can be dispensed with in cutting off the gas supply from the service main.

In Fig. 5 I have illustrated a plant wherein a separator, having also the function of cutting off the gas supply from the service pipe, is interposed between two gas washers or scrubbers n and n. The stand pipe a is set into a casing 25 provided with a dam wall 72? adapted to be closed off by the gate it". During normal'operation,the gate la is raised so that the liquid level in casing 25 i; at the line '5 i. The gas is admitted at 72 through the scrubber n, passing through the perforations f" of the partitions d and out through the second scrubber a. If, for example, it is desired to cut the scrubber n out of service and have gas pass directly from the source of supply through the scrubber noutto the service main, the gate is is lowered whereby the liquid level rises to Z Z, sealing the lower end of baflle wall m. The gas may then be admitted through the slide 0, which may be raised by suitable float controlled means (not shown) governed by the rise of level of the liquid in casing directly out through the scrubber a its passage in the other direction being barred by the water sealed baflle wall 2227'.

While I have illustrated and described my invention in considerable detail, it will be understood that modifications, within the scope of the appended claims, may readily be introduced by those skilled in the art.

What I claim is 1. A liquid separator, embodying a casing adapted to contain a fluid, a second casing having an open end set into the fluidcontaining casing, admission and discharge ports in said second casing, and a plurality of fixed vertical partitions in said second casing, each of said partitions having a perforated portion and a contact portion, the perforated portion of one partition being opposite and in line with the contact portions of adjacent partitions, and there being uninterruptedcommunicat on between adj acent partitions. I

2. A liquid separator, embodying a casing adapted to contain a fluid, a second casing having an open end set into the fluid-containing casing, admission and discharge ports in said second casing, a plurality of vertical partitions having uninterrupted, communication therebetween fixed in said second casing, and nozzle shaped perforations formed in a part of each of said par- 25; The gas enters through 0 and passes titious. said nozzle shaped perforations being directed opposite to the diliection of flow and the perforated portion ofone partition being opposite and in line withthe in'iperforate portions of adjacent partitions.

3. A liquid separator, embodying a casing adapted to contain a fluid, a second casing having an open end set into the fluid-containing casing, admission and discharge ports in said second casing, a plurality of fixed vertical partitions in said second casing, each of said partitions having a perforated portion and a contact portion, the perforated portion of one partition being opposite and in line with the contact portions of adjacent partitions, and there being uninterrupted communication between adjacent partitions, an imperforate baflie wall adjacent said discharge opening, and

means for. raising the level of the fluid in said first named-casing to form a fluid seal. In testimony whereof I have aflixed my signature in presence of two wltnesses.

HANS EDUARD THEI SEN.

W'itnesses A. V. W. Co'r'rnu, RICHARD LnMr.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3266224 *Aug 13, 1963Aug 16, 1966J W Todd FerrettiGas purification apparatus
US3653179 *Jun 5, 1969Apr 4, 1972Cockle Ventilator Co IncGrease extractor method
US5904757 *Nov 12, 1997May 18, 1999Tokyo Electron LimitedTrap apparatus
US6156107 *Mar 26, 1999Dec 5, 2000Tokyo Electron LimitedTrap apparatus
US6726752 *Jul 2, 2002Apr 27, 2004Jack LeeWater remover for an air compressor system
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/355, 55/446
Cooperative ClassificationB01D46/10