Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1089805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1914
Filing dateJul 11, 1913
Priority dateJul 11, 1913
Publication numberUS 1089805 A, US 1089805A, US-A-1089805, US1089805 A, US1089805A
InventorsGeorg Wolf
Original AssigneeWolf Gmbh Georg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medical appliance.
US 1089805 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. WOLF.

MEDICAL APPLIANCE.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 11,1913.

. 1,089,805. Patented Mar. 10, 1914.

wwww/aw zwvmm a ma W COL UUUUUU LANOGIIAIH cu, wAmuuo'mN. D. c.

UNTTED STATES PATENT @FFTQE.

GEORG- WOLF, OF BERLIN, GERMANY, ASSIGNOR TO THE FIRM OF GEORG WOLF,

Gr. 1V1 B. H., OF BERLIN. GERMANY.

MEDICAL AI$PLIANCE Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented llltar. 10, 191 4...

Application filed July 11, 1913. Serial No. 778,426.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, Greene Wonr, a citizen of the German Empire, residing at Berlin, Germany, have invented a new and useful Medical. Appliance, of which the following is a specification.

The present invention relates to instruments, which are intended for draining oil the secretion coming from one of the two urinal ducts, without its mixing with that coming from the other urinal duct. Those well-known instruments serving the above purpose, in which a tube furnished with an extension is introduced into the interior oi. the urinary bladder and is pressed with its orifice against the orifice oi the particular urinal duct, have the drawback, that a close contact with the orifice of the urinal duct is only to be obtained by the employment of considerable pressure. The same drawback attaches to those instruments, in which an elastic partition is spread out within the urinary bladder.

In the new instrument a tube is fitted with a flexible extension, which reaches through a dilatable bladder (made, 0. g., of rubber), so that the orifice of the extension lies in the outer surface of the said bladder or projects slightly beyond it, while the interior of the bladder is connected with a second tube. By means of this second tube the bladder, after being introduced while empty into the urinary bladder, can be dilated by pneumatic or liquid pressure, so as to effect a close contact between the tube-extension and the orifice of one of the urinal duets. YVhen it is desired to press the bladder in certain places more firmly against the wall of the urinary bladder, this increase in pressure can be c ffected by one or more .spring bows, which are suitably connected with the bladder.

It is found convenient to so dispose the two tubes that the tube fitted with the extension is inclosed by the tube belonging to the bladder, so as to give to that part of the instrument, which is to be introduced into the body of the patient, a surface, which is as smooth as possible and easy to keep tree from impurities. The secretion coming from the other urinal duct may pass through between the bladder of the instrument and the wall of the urinary bladder and be drained oil through an auxiliary tube to the outside. WVhen it is desired to collect the secretions coming from both the urinal ducts each at its duct orifice at the same time and to drain them oil" separately, a second tube 1' arching through the bladder of the instrument with a flexible extension may be provided instead of an auxiliary tube, so that the orifices of the two extensions can be pressed simultaneously against the two urinal duct orifices. It is convenient to inclose this tube as well by the tube belonging to the bladder. llhen the instrument not to be introduced directly through the urethra, it may be pushed in a well-known manner through a catheter-tube placed in the said urethra.

When the bladder of the instrument consists of such a material that it is transparent at least in its dilated coinlition, that part oi the outermost tube, which is not required for thedraining oll' oi? the secretion, can serve for the reception oil. one of the well-known observing apparatus for the inspection of the urinary bladder. In order to be able to exchange such an apparatus for another one, while the bladder oil the instrument is in a dilated condition, a nonareturn flap may be provided, which, on the observing apparatus being removed, prevents the contents of the bladder of the instrument from escaping.

For controlling the pressure exercise on the wall of the bladder of the instrument a pressure gage may be employed, which is in communication with the interior of the said bladder.

In the annexed drawing Figure 1 is a longitudinal section through an instrument according to the invention, which is intended for collecting simultancrnisly the secretions coming from the two urinal ducts each at the orifice oil? its duct and to drain them OH to the outside. Fig. 2 is a part section along line 2-9 of Fig. 1.. Fig. 3 is a section along line 3*?) 031: Fig. 1.

In a neck a .of a thin rubber bladder a a tube 7) fixed by means of a ring Z)". Two thin little tubes (.1 are led through the wall or the tube Z), the joint being rendered airtight, and rest at that one of their ends which is nearest to the rubber bladder in a supporting body 0. Each of these small tubes is provided at its end lying within the rubber bladder with an extension (Z, which widens out in the shape of a funnel and is made of comparatively thick rubber. Each extension is attached at its enlarged end, so as to make an air-tight joint, to the edges of an opening a suitably disposed in the rubber bladder, the two openings being so located that their centers correspond to the average position of the orifices of the urinal ducts. causes the rubber bladder to lie particularly closely against that part of the wall of the urinary bladder, which lies between the orifices of the urinal ducts. Close to that end of the tube 7), which lies farthest from the rubber bladder, there is attached to the said tube a socket 6 provided with a cock 6 which serves for introducing air or liquid into the rubber bladder. A second socket 6, which is threaded, serves for attaching a pressure gage. A headpiece screwed onto the tube Z) contains a bore f which together with a second bore 0 of the supporting body 0 (0 and being coaxial) serves for the reception of an observing instrument (6. g. a cystoscope), which, being introduced into the interior of the rubber bladder, permits of an inspection of the urinary bladder being made after the rubber bladder has been dilated. A rubber ring f acts as stufiing, while a non-return flap prevents the contents of the rubber bladder escaping, should the observing apparatus be removed from the instrui'nent. The supporting body a is provided on its periphery with two axially directed grooves 0 which permit of the pressure in the rubber bladder being varied, even with the observing apparatus in position.

I claim:

1. In a medical appliance adapted to be introduced into the urinary bladder a dilatable bladder, a tubular member communicating at one of its ends with the interior of the said dilatable bladder, means for dilating this bladder through the said tubular member and tubular means adapted to drain the said urinary bladder extending through the said dilatable bladder, the part exte11ding through this bladder being flexible.

In a medical appliance adapted to be introduced into the urinary bladder a dilatable bladder, a tubular member communicating at one of its ends with the interior of the said dilatable bladder, means for dilating this bladder through the said tubular member and tubular means adapted to drain the said urinary bladder lying Within the A resilient metal bow at said tubular member and extending through the said dilatable bladder, the part extending through this bladder being flexible.

3. In a medical appliance adapted to be introduced into the urinary bladder a dilatable bladder, a tubular member communicating at one of its ends with the interior of the said dilatable bladder, means for dilating this bladder through the said tubular member and two small tubes adapted to drain the said urinary bladder lying within the said tubular member and having each a flexible extension at one end, such extensions reaching through the said dilatable bladder.

4. In a medical appliance adapted to be introduced into the urinary bladder a dilat able bladder, a tubular member communicating at one of its ends with the interior of the said dilatable bladder, means for dilating this bladder through the said tubularmember, a resilient metal bow fixed to the said member and adapted to lie against the inner surface of the said dilatable bladder and two small tubes adapted to drain the said urinary bladder lying within the said tubular member and having each a fiexible extension at one end, such extensions reaching through the said dilatable bladder.

5. In a medical appliance adapted to be introduced into the urinary bladder a dilatable bladder, a tubular member communicating at one of its ends with the interior of the said dilatable bladder, means for dilating this bladder through the said tubular member, a resilient metal bow fixed to the said member and adapted to lie against the inner surface of the said dilatable bladder, two small tubes adapted to drain the said urinary bladder lying within the said tubular member and having each a flexible extension at one end, such extensions reaching through the said dilatable bladder, a supporting body at the end of the tubular member nearest the said dilatable bladder, a headpiece at the other end of the tubular member, a non-return flap Within this headpiece, coaxial holes. in the said supporting body and the said headpiece and axially directed grooves in the said supporting body.

GEORG VJOLF.

Vitnesses:

Gnone WILLnRs, CURT KRE'rsoHMANN.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2867213 *Jun 12, 1957Jan 6, 1959Jr Paul A ThomasFlutter valve for drainage of the pleural cavity
US3087492 *Dec 29, 1960Apr 30, 1963May L ChesterValved catheters
US3131694 *Jan 16, 1963May 5, 1964May L ChesterCatheters
US3168092 *Jun 15, 1961Feb 2, 1965Silverman DanielMedical probing instrument having flexible, extrudable tubing adapted to be extraverted under pressure into a body cavity
US3190291 *Oct 8, 1962Jun 22, 1965Frederic E B FoleySelf-inflating bag catheter
US4219026 *Sep 15, 1978Aug 26, 1980The Kendall CompanyBladder hemostatic catheter
US4406656 *Jun 1, 1981Sep 27, 1983Brack Gillium HattlerVenous catheter having collapsible multi-lumens
US4510933 *May 13, 1983Apr 16, 1985Dragerwerk AktiengesellschaftSuction adapter and medical draining set and method of using a tracheal draining device
US4610663 *Dec 18, 1984Sep 9, 1986The Kendall CompanyNephrostomy catheter with side connector
US4779611 *Feb 24, 1987Oct 25, 1988Grooters Ronald KDisposable surgical scope guide
US4809713 *Oct 28, 1987Mar 7, 1989Joseph GrayzelCatheter with magnetic fixation
US4877033 *May 4, 1988Oct 31, 1989Seitz Jr H MichaelDisposable needle guide and examination sheath for transvaginal ultrasound procedures
US4943280 *Dec 31, 1987Jul 24, 1990United States Surgical CorporaitonSelf-seating flapper valve for an insufflation cannula assembly
US4954130 *Apr 17, 1989Sep 4, 1990William P. WatersCatheter/heparin lock and method of using same
US5053016 *Mar 2, 1990Oct 1, 1991United States Surgical CorporationValve seat for an insufflation cannula assembly
US5098393 *May 31, 1988Mar 24, 1992Kurt AmplatzMedical introducer and valve assembly
US5127909 *Apr 5, 1990Jul 7, 1992United States Surgical CorporationFlapper valve for an insufflation cannula assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/99.1, 604/256
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/1018