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Publication numberUS1093262 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 14, 1914
Filing dateJun 17, 1913
Priority dateJun 17, 1913
Publication numberUS 1093262 A, US 1093262A, US-A-1093262, US1093262 A, US1093262A
InventorsJohn B Goldsborough
Original AssigneeJohn B Goldsborough
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of underpinning buildings.
US 1093262 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. B. GOLDSBOROUGH.

METHOD OF UNDERPINNING BUILDINGS.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 17 1913.

Patnted Apr. 14,1914.

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METHOD OF UNDERPINNING BUILDINGS.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 17I 1913.

1,093,262. Patented Apr. 14, 1914.

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JOHN B. GOLDSBOROUGH, or onoromnnw YORK.

METHOD OF UNDERPINNING BUILDINGS.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that 1, JOHN B. GoLDsBoR- oUeH, a citizen of the United States, residing in Croton, in the county of Westchester and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Methods of Underpinning Buildings, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to the underpinning of buildings and similar heavy structures, and has for its object to provide means whereby a new and permanent foundation or underpinning may be provided for such building or other structure at any desired depth lower than the original foundation without undermining the original foundation or interfering with the supporting power of the earth upon which the same rests.

A further and important object of my invention is to provide such building or other structure with an underpinning or new foundation without the employment of temporary supports for the structure being underpinned or of shores, braces, needle beams, etc., the employment of which obstructs the work in hand and interferes with the occupancy of the adjoining building.

It frequently becomes necessary, for various reasons, to provide a building with a new and deeper foundation. The foundations of the majority of buildings, particularly in cities, are usually located at from 12 to 15 feet below the curb and a slight distance below the basement floor. Such foundations are ample when undisturbed but when, as is often the case, adjacent building operations require an excavation to a greater depth than the said foundation, or when the bearing power of the soil has become disturbed by the draining of the water therefrom through excavations nearby, or when the weight on the building is greatly increased, it becomes necessary to provide a building with foundations of increased supporting power. and usually in case of deeper excavations alongside, such foundations are extended to a greater depthand until they reach a sub-strata of sufiicient bearing power to support the increased weight. Such underpinning operations, particularly in cases where buildings have been supported upon piers or columns, have usually required that the earth underlying the original founda- Speeification of Letters Patent.

Application filed June 17, 1913.

Patented Apr. 1d, 1914:.

Serial No. 774,258.

tions should be removed; and such foundations themselves have usually likewise been removed to provide sufficient headroom for construction of a new foundation. Such operations have involved the temporary sup port of the structure being underpinned. This is recognized as a difiicult anddangerous undertaking and it is a decided advantage to be able to dispense with it. There is also a great advantage in providing a new foundation without removing the earth from under the original foundation or interfering with the supporting power thereof.

My invention may be employed in underpinning a continuous wall having the ordinary type of foundation usually provided for such walls or in underpinning a wall which is supported upon isolated piers or columns having independent footings. In the latter case I preferably bond the said footings together and provide a new and extended footing in accordance with the method invented by me and more particularly described and claimed in my Patent Reissue No. 13,610 dated August 26, 1913.

The particular invention forming the subject-matter ,of this application is an improvement upon the method disclosed in my application for patent, Serial No. 717 ,303, filed August 27, 1912. According to the said application beams are located transversely of the wall closely adjacent to the base portion thereof and these beams are then connected to suitable supporting columns. The said transverse beams are the means whereby the weight of the building wall is transferred to the underpinning columns and it is a matter of importance that the said beams should bear evenly upon the base portion of this wall as the strains are very heavy and if concentrated upon a few points of the wall are liable to crush the wall.

My present invention has for its object to provide means whereby a uniform and con tinuous contact between the transverse beams and the base portions of the wall may be assured.

The accompanying drawing illustrates a desirable embodiment of my invention. Here Figure 1 illustrates the manner of forcing the transverse beams to place beneath the wall; Fig. 2 illustrates a continuous wall in the underpinning of which my invention is employed, different phases of the work being shown at different points; Fig. 3 is a plan view of Fig. 2; Fig. I is an elevation of a wall supported upon piers and underpinned according to my invention; and Figs. 5 and 6 are typical cross sections of Fig. 4, illustrating different modes of forming columns. Fig. 7 is a typical cross section for instance on the line 77 Fig, 2, illustrating the uneven contour of the bottom of the footing. Fig. 8 is a typical similar cross section taken for instance on the line 88 Fig. 2, illustrating the application of applicants invention.

According to my invention a supporting member A is forced through the earth transversely of the wall and immediately below the base portion thereof and is then cleaned. out so as to remove the earth therefrom. At the same time the earth is removed up to the bottom or base of the wall. The base of the wall is preferably cleaned of adhering dirt, etc., and in the space within the beam A and up to the bottom of the foundation or base part of the wall liquid grout, concrete or the like is inserted in such manner as that it shall flow into and completely fill the space and thereby establish and form a durable connection between the said beam A and the bottom of the wall, whereby the weight of the wall is uniformly and evenly borne in part by the said beam A. The said beam A may well be inserted in place, as indicated in Fig. 1, wherein space having been provided, by excavation if necessary, at one side of the wall the beam is located in position at one side of and lower than the foundation or base portion B of the wall and is then pushed to place by a hydraulic or other jack C which reacts against an abutment D so as to force the beam transversely of the wall. The said supporting member A is preferably in the form of a hollow beam having an open top, and for this purpose I have heretofore preferred to employ I-beams a a of which a pair is preferably employed, and more than two if desired, to each supporting member. The number of I-beams employed for each supporting member will depend upon the ultimate strength required in the said member. I prefer I-beams because their flanges provide a desirable means whereby the weight is transferred fro-m the wall to the supporting member or beam A. Other flanged beams might serve such as channel or angle beams. The said supporting member A is open at the top for the reason that it occasionally is found that the base portions or foundations B of building walls are very rough and irregular. They may be of rough and irregularly laid concrete or rubble, boulders, cut-stone, or what-not. Little or no attention is usually paid to having them of even contour at the bottom. Therefore, it will be perceived that if the supporting member A were inserted beneath the foundation or base portion B of the wall and made contact therewith at only possibly one point, that when the said supporting member A were fulfilling its function of transferring the weight of the wall to the underpinning there would be grave danger of rupturing the wall or bending the supporting member. This danger is obviated by my present invention.

In Fig. 7 there is illustrated a typical cross section of a foundation of a building or other structure wherein an I-beam A has been driven transversely beneath the footing for the purpose of transferring the weight to underpinning columns H. Here it is seen that the uneven contour at the bottom of the footing B results in the existence of spaces S between the top of the I-beam A and the said foot-ing B. This causes a concentration of the weight on one or two points of the footing which is extremely undesirable. weight is concentrated at one point of the footing if the footing engages the I-beam at only one point, as would be the case if a footing at one point only projected considerably below the common plane.

In Fig. 8 I have illustrated the manner in which my invention overcomes the evil results of such conditions Here the I-beam A is shown in dotted lines and grout or concrete S is inserted between the top flange of the I-beam and the bottom of the footing B, thereby causing a uniform and continuous connection between the Lbeam and the foot-' ing at all points.

My invention is equally applicable to the underpinning of a continuous wall, as illus-- trated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, where the wall E has foundations B which it wlll be seen are irregular at the bottom. The said invention may likewise be employed in underpinning a wall as illustrated in Figs. 1, 5 and 6, wherein the building wall, which has been omitted for economy of space, is supported upon isolated piers F, each of which has its independent foundation or footing B. In said figures these footings have been bonded together, according to the invention of my Patent Re-issue No. 13,610, to provide a unitary and extended footing G. The invention is only illustrated in connection therewith to show that it is capable of greatly extending the usefulness of the said invention and that it is particularly applicable thereto, and as illustrating one manner in which it may be used to underpin a wall supported on piers.

My invention is intended to transfer the weight of the wall to underpinning columns and accordingly I have illustrated several ways in which said columns may be constructed. Such columns may take the form It may be that such of concrete piers H constructed in pits, as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. In this case I prefer to locate the said pits a suitable distance away ,from the footings B and the supporting member A may be made longer so as to rest upon the said columns. Shims and wedges or other suitable means may be employed to transfer the weight to the columns H. In case sectional cylinders are employed to form the underpinning columns, they will preferably be driven into the earth directly beneath the footings so that they may be forced down by the use of the Weight of the structure being underpinned exerted through some instrumentality, as through a hydraulic or other jack, for this purpose. This may well be done in accordance with the method of the Breuchaud Patent No. 568,130, dated June 30, 1896. Such columns are illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6. In Fig. 5 the underpinning columns J, J are sectional cylinders which have been forced into the earth by means of a jack reacting against the footing G and employing the weight of the wall as resistance to force the cylinders J, J into the earth. In said figure the pits in which the columns J have been forced into the earth are illustrated as filled with concrete J which forms a pressure resisting connection between the cylinders and the supporting member A and shims I are driven between the transverse supporting member A and the concrete connection J to cause the weight of the wall to be borne by the column. If desired the underpinning cylinders may have upper sections K, as in Fig. 6, which extend substantially up to the supporting member A and are directly connected thereto by shims.

I have found it desirable in some cases to inclose the supporting member A in concrete or the like, and accordingly I have illustrated in the several figures the removal of the soil on each side of the said supporting member. This enables me to fill the space thus formed with grout or the like at the same time that the beam A is filled and thereby I am enabled to surround the said beam A with the protecting grout which desirably increases the area of the supporting member. This may safely be done, because I preferably form the columns, whether the same consist of the columns H or of the underpinning cylinders J before driving the supporting beams A and therefore, in case columns H have been located, the supporting beams A may after they have been driven be connected to the said columns so as to be supported thereby before the earth outside of said beamsis excavated and thereby additional support will be provided and enable the excavation to be safely made. In case the underpinning cylinders are employed the same will be preferably connected up to the footing G, if this style of footing is employed, so as to temporarily support the same before the supporting members are driven or the additional excavation on each side thereof is made.

I do not regard my invention as necessarily limited to the kind of wall being underpinned or to the kind of columns employed in connection therewith or the number of beams employed in each supporting member, as said wall may be of any kind and the underpinning columns may, if, employed, be of any desired construction and may in some instances be entirely omitted and the number of beams may be varied for different cases according to circumstances. These and other modifications may be made within the limits of the appended claims.

What I claim is 1. The method of underpinning buildings or other structures, which consists in 'l'forcing a supporting member having side walls and open at the top through the earth transversely of, and closely adjacent to, the base portion of said building or other structure, in cleaning out the earth from said support ing member and up to the underside of said base portion, and filling the spaces between the top of said supporting member and the underside of said base portion and the space between the side walls of said supporting member with grout or the like.

2. The method of underpinning buildings or other structures, which consists in locating an underpinning column in the earth adjacent the structure to be underpinned, in forcing a supporting member having side walls and open at the top through the earth transversely of the foundation of said building or other structure and closely adjacent the base portion thereof, in cleaning out the earth from said supporting member and up to the base of the said foundation, and filling the spaces between the top of said supporting member and the underside of said base portion and the space between the side walls of said supporting member with grout or the like, and in interposing a pressure resisting connection between the said column and said supporting member.

3. The method of underpinning buildings or other structures, which consists in locating an underpinning column in the earth adjacent the structure to be underpinned, in then temporarily supporting said structure upon said column, in forcing a supporting member having side walls and open at the top through the earth transversely of the foundation of said building or other structure, and closely adjacent the base portion thereof, in cleaning out the earth from said supporting member and up to the base of the said foundation, and filling the spaces between the top of said supporting member and the underside of said base portion and the space between the side walls of said supporting member with grout or the like, and

in interposing a pressure resisting connection between the said column and said supporting member.

4:. The method of underpinning a building or other structure, which consists in forcing a pair of substantially parallel I beams through the earth transversely of the foundation of said building or other structure and closely adjacent the base portion thereof, in cleaning out the earth between said I- beams and up to the base of the said foundation and filling the spaces between the top of said I-beams and the underside of said base portion and the space between the side walls of said I-beams with grout or the like.

5. The method of underpinning a building or other structure, which consists in forcing a pair of substantially parallel I beams through the earth transversely of the foundation of said building or other structure, and closely adjacent the base portion thereof, in cleaning out the earth between said I- beams and up to the base of the said foundation and filling the spaces between the top of said I-beams and the underside of said base port-ion and the space between the side walls of said I-beams with grout or the like, and in connecting the said beams to supporting columns.

(3. An underpinning for buildings or the like, comprising a supporting beam having side walls and open at the top located beneath the base portion of the foundation thereof, and a filling of grout or the like in said beam and extending to the base of the said foundation and filling the spaces between the top of said beam and the underside of said foundation, whereby an even and uniform connection between the said beam and base portion of the foundation is provided, an underpinning column located in the earth and a pressure resisting connection between the said column and said supporting beam.

7. An underpinning for buildings or the like, comprising I-beams located transversely of the foundation thereof and closely adjacent the base portion of said foundation, a filling of grout or the like between the said I-beams and extending to the base of the said foundation and filling the spaces between the top of said beam and the underside of said foundation, whereby a uniform and continuous connection is provided between the said I-beams and the base of said foundation, an underpinning column located in the earth and a pressure resisting connection between the said column and said I-beams.

8. The method of underpinning a building or other structure, which consists in forcing a flanged beam transversely of the foundation thereof and closely adjacent the base portion of said foundation, in removing the earth at the sides of said beam and between the beam and the base of the foundation and filling the space thus formed with concrete or the like whereby an even and uniform connection is made between said beam and the said foundation. r

9. The method of underpinning building 7 or other structures, which consists in locating an underpinning column in the earth adjacent the structure to be underpinned, in then temporarily supporting said structure upon said column, in forcing a flanged beam transversely of the foundation of said building or other structure and closely adjacent the base portion thereof, in removing the earth at the sides of said beam and between the beam and the base of the said foundation and filling the spaces between the top of said flanged beam and the under side of said base portion and the spaces at the sides of said beam with concrete or the like whereby an even and uniform connection is made between said beam and the underside of said foundation, and in connecting the said beam to said column.

10. The method of underpinning buildings or other structures, which consists in locating an underpinning column in the earth adjacent the structure to be underpinned, in forcing a flanged beam transversely of the foundation of said building or other structure and closely adjacent the base portion thereof, in removing the earth between the top of the beam and the base portion of the said foundation, and filling the space thus formed with grout or the like, whereby an even and uniform connection between the wall and said beam is formed and connecting said beam to said underpinning column.

11. A support .for buildings or other structures comprising a flanged beam located in the earth transversely of the foundation of said structure, and a filling of grout or the like between the upper side of said beam and the underside of said foundation, whereby an even and uniform connection between the wall and said, beam is formed.

12. A support for buildings or other structures comprising a flanged beam located in the earth transversely of the foundation of said structure, and a filling of grout or the like between the upper side of said beam and the underside of said foundation whereby an even and uniform connection between the wall and said beam is formed, underpinning columns located in the earth adjacent the ends of said beams, and connections between said beam and said columns.

13. The method of underpinning buildings or other structures, which consists in forcing a flanged beam transversely of the foundation of said building or other structure and closely adjacent the base portion thereof, in removing the earth between the signed my name in the presence of two subtop of the beam and the base portion of the scribing witnesses. said. foundation, and filling the space thus formed with grout or the like, whereby an JOHN GOLDSBOROUGH' 5 even and uniform connection between the Witnesses:

wall and said beam is formed. GEORGE MILLER,

In Witness whereof, I have hereunto JOSEPH F. SHWEDO.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of IE'atents,

Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5575593 *Jul 11, 1994Nov 19, 1996Atlas Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for installing a helical pier with pressurized grouting
US6062770 *Aug 16, 1996May 16, 2000Beck; RolandMethod for underpinning buildings
US6308465 *Jun 21, 1999Oct 30, 2001Equitech, Inc.Systems and utility modules for buildings
WO2000079067A1 *May 3, 2000Dec 28, 2000Equitech IncSystems and utility modules for buildings
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/230
Cooperative ClassificationE02D35/00