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Publication numberUS1096846 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 19, 1914
Filing dateMay 31, 1912
Priority dateMay 31, 1912
Publication numberUS 1096846 A, US 1096846A, US-A-1096846, US1096846 A, US1096846A
InventorsFranklin L Lane, Harrison J Mitchell
Original AssigneeBerlin Machine Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mounting for resilient cushions.
US 1096846 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. L. LANE L H. J. MITCHELL.

MOUNTING FOR RBSILIBNT CUSHIONS.

APPLICATION rILnn MAY31, 1912.

1,096,846 Patented May 19, 1914u J0 JZJJSZJ l J0 i3 Jz lll@ :2l `ywmsmmlpmmw 'IIllllll IIII1IIIIIIIIIIII\\"\ a l/Illllllllliwlllllll 9 r/// W 2 J5 19 .J5 J [9 FATE i SATS FFIQFL,

FRANKLIN L. LANE AND HARRISON J. MITCHELL, OF BELOIT, WISCONSIN, ASSIGNORS TO THE BERLIN MACHINE WORKS, OF BELOIT, WISCONSIN, A. CORPORATION 0F WISCONSIN.

MOUNTING FOR RESILIENT CUSI'IIONS.

To all whom it may concern "le it known that we, FRANKLIN L. LANE and HARRISON J. hairrcHnLL, residing` at Beloit, in the county of Rock and State ot lVisconsin, have invented certain new and useful. Improvements in Mountings for ltosilient Cushions, oit which the following is a specilication.

This invention concerns or pertains to novel features and improvements in con veyers, carriers, endless beds, and the like, and relates more particularly or especially to those equipped, with resilient or yielding friction cushions.

rlhe preferred embodiments oit the invention described in detail below are especially applicable tor use in connection with endless carriers for woml-workingr machinery, such for example, as sand-paperino` machines and planers, but their use, however, as will be apparent, is in no way limited to such class oit devices.

@ne otI the leading objects and purposes oit the invention is the provision et a cushion provided with el'lecti ve and eliicient holding;- means for maintaining it in proper place on the carrier, whereby the board or other article carried or transported by the conveyor is firmly gripped and prevented troni slipping' as it passes through the machine and is being' operated upon.

ln order that those skilled in the art may have a :t'ull and Complete understanding o'lf the invention, its structural Ytentures and advantages, a plurality ot' embodiments of the saine have been illustrated in the accompanying drawings which form a part oit this specification, and to which reference should be made.

In these drawings: Figure l shows a bar or slat of a conveyor or endless bed supplied with a plurality of elastic cushions incorporating our invention. Figs. 2, 3, 4t, and 5, illustrate in cross-section ditl'erent means ttor effectively holding' such cushions to the bars or slats ot' the conveyor; Fig. 6 shows in cross-section still another method oit hold- `ing the cushions, and Fie'. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary section showingl the action ot `the cushion under compression.

In sand-paperino; or planing machines, it is desirable or necessary in those devices equipped with endless traveling beds, partieularly where short stock is used, to pre- Speccaton of Letters Patent.

Application filed May 31, 1912.

Patented May 19, 1914.

serial No. 700,577.

vent the boards from slipping on such bed or conveyor while being; acted upon by the sand-paperino drums or planing-cyliiuler. .lt has been suggested heretofore to equip the iaee of such an endless carrier or bed with rubber or other suitable resilient cushions, preferably staggered, on which the board rests during); its travel through the machine. Ditliculty has been experienced in holding such cushions electivelyv and tixedly on the conveyor' to prevent their being worked or pushed out of place or torn from position while the board is beine` operated upon by the unafhanism. In other words, the strain on these cushions is considerable, and must be cared ttor in the holding-devices referred to.

The present invention involves the employment ot rubber or other suitable yield ingr cushions ot' such shape as to secure a suction-hold on the board, the cushions bein aheld to the slats or bars ol the eonveyer or movable bed by a new and ilnproved means possessing an. unusual degree of ellirieney in their holding or retainingefl'ect.

In Fig'. l el the drawings, the cross-bar or stat 9 ot an endless bed or conveyer has 'fastened thereto a plurality oit cylindrical rubber cushions '10, 10, each of which has embedded in its base a canvas or other suitable t'abric 1l, which, as will be readily understood, sti'liens and strengthens the base oi the rubber. Also in the particular embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. f2, each ot these round cushions has in `its top face a concentric cylindrical cavity 1Q aecommodating a round retaining disk or washer' 13 oit less thickness than the depth ot the recess 12, such disk being' centrally conically apertured Ylor the accommodation ot the conical-shaped head 111 ot a screw 15 which extends through a. central hole 16 in the rubber cushion, the threads oi such screw engaging and (ro-acting with those ot a threaded hole 17 in the bar or slat 9. 'lhat is to say, in this way, each rubber cushion by means of its screw, is securely fastened to the support or bar 9, and the space or cavity above the retaining disk or washer makes of the cushion a suction cup possessing a marked degree of holding-eifect on the board or other member placed thereon and conveyed thereby. Obviously, the rubber` being yielding, constitutes a resilient cushion, and a series of cross-barseach equipped with a group or plurality of such cushions provides an endless bed or conveyer yielding in character, and pre\'fenting the board o-r other member from slipping because of the adequate friction between the saine and these suction cups or cushions. In some cases it is desirable to provide some kind of a support or retainer around the exterior of the cushion, and in F ig. 3 there is shown a wire ring 13 encircling the cushion and acting in conjunction with the screw and disk to hold or fasten the cushion or suction cup securely to the bar, such ring counteracting or overcoming any tendency for the rubber cushion to tear away from the bar or slat around its periphery or external portion. Such ring acts to stifl'en the rubber at the lower section of the cushion and constitutes a confining member to assist in holding the cushion in place.

1n Fig. a a slightly modified construction is shown in which the cross-bar or slat of the conveyer or bed is provided in its top surface with a cylindrical recess or cavity 20` for each cushion 10 so that the latter is partially accommodated within such recess, the upstanding flange or portion 21 around the cavity constituting a retaining and support--Y ing wall for the lower portion of the cushion. vThe upper edge of this wall, that is, the top surface of the bar 19, is desirably though not necessarily, on substantially the same level as the top surface of the disk or washer 13, although this feature of construction, as will be readily understood, is not absolutely essential. Such arrangement of the parts, however, secures an adequate cooperating holding or retaining effect of the various members constituting the supporting device for the cushion.

'ln some instances and under some circumstances it is convenient and desirable to supply a suitable space inside of the retaining wall of the cushion to permit the flowing, swelling or distorting of the rubber brought about by the pressure exerted on the top of the cushion. Such a modified construction is shown in Fig. 5 in which the conveyer or carrier 9 has on its top surface a sheet-metal cup or shell 22 having at its top an inturned flange or rim 23 circular in shape and acting as a support for the portion ofthe rubber cushion which it surrounds. As is clearly indicated in Fig. 5, an annular space is provided beneath such iiange, into which the rubber of the cushion may swell or enlarge or flow under pressure, the disk or washer 13, cushion 10, and shell or cup 22 being all held or fastened to the bar 9 by a central screw 15.v As in the instance shown in Fig. l, the flange 23 is desirably on substantially the same level as the top of the disk or washer 13, a sufficient portion of the round vrubber cushion projectingabove the parts 13 and 23, to afford a yielding surface on which the board or other article being carried is adapted to rest. It will be observed that this rubber or resilient cushion 1()` is confined and fastened both internally and externally, whereby the maximum retaining and holding-effect is obtained, any tendency for dislodgment or displacement of the cushion being overcome and resistedv by the combined and conjoint action of the disk 13 and the the top surface of the bar 19, is desirable, surrounding shell or cup 22, which, at the flange 23, pres-ents an opening for the accommodation of the cushion of substantially the same diameter as the cushion. This cushion, however, has free Vplay to exert its resilient effectv on the board, being free to swell or expand in the shell 22 beneath the flange In other words, rubber is not compressible to any great degree, it being merely capable of distortion or Vflowing at one part due to pressure brought upon some other part. It is because of this that the enlarOed or undercut cavity is provided in the shell 22.

The construction shown Yin 5 shows the bar 9 as provided with a slight depression 24 for the accommodation of a small boss 25 struck downwardly out of the base of the shell 22 and fitting in the cavity 24. This acts as a holding construction to prevent turning ot the cushion around the screw 15 when the board being fed through the sand-papering or planing machine covers only a portion of the cushion. Under such circumstances, as will be readily understood, there would be a tendency exerted on the cushion to revolve itV around its axis, that is, around the screw 15. c

1n Fig. 6 a slightly modified construction is shown, in which there is provided a sheet-metal shell 26 which, instead of having an inturned flange at its upper edge is supplied with a tapered wall 27, presenting at its top a round mouth of substantially the same size as the external diameter of the cushion 10 which it is adapted to accommodate. In this case, as in the instance shown in F ig. 5, the rubber or other resilient maferial can expand or flow in the enlargedv space within the shell at thebase ofthe cushion.

The manner in which the rubberv flows, or expands, vor distorts, 1s shown'inVV ico Fig. 7. It enlarges above the top edge of the flange 27 and swells into substantially the form shown Yinside the shell, the bottomisoV taining-effect on the cushion. The advancing part of the rubber cushion is held from tearing away from the bar or slat by the shell, such section of the cushion being backed up by the internal washer or disk 13. The rear portion of the cushion is held up in place and supported by the flange of the shell and is also held down in position by the central disk so that these combined holding-means act to maintain the cushion in proper position and proper relation under the severest conditions of service.

Vhile we have herein illustrated and described several embodiments of the invention, We Wish to have it understood that the same is not to be limited to the exact and precise constructions herein shown, as many minor mechanical changes may be made in the same without departure 'from the substance and essence of our invention, and without the sacrifice of any of its substantial benefits and advantages,

l/Vhat We claim is:

1. In a Wood-Working machine, the conibination of a bed, a resilient concave cushion disposed thereon, and internally and externally arranged means to secure the cushion to the bed, substantially as described.

2. In a wood working machine, the combination of a bed, a resilient concave cushion disposed thereon, and internally and externally arranged means to secure the cush ion to the bed, said securing means comprising a shell having a base underlying and a Wall inclosing the cushion walls and extending inwardly' into engagement with the upper portion of the cushion walls in combination with a retainer seated within the cavity of the cushion, and a fastening device attaching the retainer and bed through the bases of the cushion and shell, substantially as described.

3. In a Wood Working machine, the combination of a bed plate, a plurality of resilient concave cushions disposed thereon in spaced relation to each other, and internally and externally arranged means to secure the cushions to the bed, substantially as described.

4. In a wood working machine, the combination of a bed plate, a plurality of resilient concave cushions disposed thereon in spaced relation to each other, and internally and externally arranged means to secure the cushions to the bed, said securing means comprising a shell having a base underlying and a Wall inclosing the cushion Walls and extending inwardly into engagement with the upper portion of the cushion walls in combination with a retainer seated within the cavity of the cushion, and a fastening device attaching the retainer and bed through the bases of the cushion and shell, substantially as described.

5. In a wood working machine, the combination of a bed plate, a plurality oi resilient concave cushions disposed thereon in spaced relation to each other, and internally and externally arranged means to secure the cushions to the bed, said securing means comprising a shell having a base underlying and a wall inclosing the cushion walls in spaced relation thereto in the lower portion and extending inwardly into engagement with the upper portion of the cushion walls, in combination with a retainer seated within the cavity of the cushion, and a screw attaching the retainer and bed to the bases of the cushion and shell, substantially as described.

FRANKLIN L. LANE. HARRISON J. MITCHELL.

Witnesses VVAL'rnn M. FULLER, MILTON MILLER.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for ve cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2834998 *Jan 25, 1954May 20, 1958Douglas Aircraft Co IncMeans for mounting a frangible expanse to a vibratile support
US2949325 *Feb 27, 1956Aug 16, 1960Parker Hannifin CorpHigh pressure sealing device
US6227784Aug 17, 1999May 8, 2001Federal-Mogul World Wide, Inc.Fastener assembly with vibration isolating features
US7131809 *Mar 19, 2003Nov 7, 2006Illinois Tool Works IncBody bolt absorber assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/688.1, 411/544
Cooperative ClassificationB65G2201/02