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Publication numberUS1098979 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 2, 1914
Filing dateJan 22, 1912
Priority dateJan 22, 1912
Publication numberUS 1098979 A, US 1098979A, US-A-1098979, US1098979 A, US1098979A
InventorsKarl Schuchard
Original AssigneeKarl Schuchard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Jigging-machine.
US 1098979 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

K. SUHUGHARD.

JIGGING MACHINE.

APPLICATION IILED JAN. 22, 1912.

1,098,979. Patented June 2, 1914.

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K. SGHUCHARD.

JIGGING MACHINE.

APPLIOATION FILED JAN. 22, 1912.

Patented June 2, 19M

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TTNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

KARL SOHUCHARD, 0F BEU'IHEN, O. 8., GER-MANY.

JIGGING-MACHINE Application filed January 22, 1912.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, KARL SoI-IUoI-rAnD, engineer, a subject of the German Emperor, residing at No. 2 Konigshiitter Chausse, Beuthen, O. S., Germany, have invented new and useful Improvements in Jigging-Machines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to settling machines wherein the jigging action is accomplished by the pulsation of a stream of water to and fro through a perforated stationary carrier whereon the material to be separated is supported. Such perforated carriers have heretofore been formed as a perforated fiat sheet, but this construction however permits only of an extremely imperfect utilization of the jigging force of the water, considerable loss of energy and unsatisfactory performance of work thereby resulting.

The present invention is intended to obviate these defects. For this purpose, the carrier is enlarged by corrugation or other suitable formation and formed over its whole surface with perforations which allow of the jigging water not only acting vertically, or at any rate approximately vertically but also obliquely against the material to be separated.

The shape, length, width and depth as well as the course of the individual corrugations, that is to say whether they run in the direction of flow of the material to be jigged or transversely thereto, or are inclined at any angle to it, may be determined. according to the particular conditions and purposes.

The accompanying drawings illustrate settling machines provided with corrugated carriers according to the present invention.

Figure 1 is a transverse section through a settling machine of simple constructional form, and Fig. 2 is a plan view of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a transverse section through another constructional form. Fig. 4t is a front view of Fig. 3, partially in section on the line A-B. Figs. 5 to 13 are diagrammatic transverse sections of various improved carriers.

The machine consists of one or more re ceptacles B, which are arranged one beside the other and are filled with water. A piston K is moved up and down in each receptacle B and forces the water to pulsate to and fro through the underside of the carrier a upon which the material to be sepa- Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 2, 1914. Serial No. 672,748.

rated is supported. Owing to the augmentation of the superficial area of the material carrier obtained by the corrugations the jigging action is increased in an admirable manner. The heavy material settles in the troughs of the corrugations from which it can be easily removed, while the lighter material rises to the top and passes out in the longitudinal direction of the machine, that is, in the direction of the feed of the machine or the direction in which the material is transported from one settling section to the adjacent one.

In the constructional form shown in Figs. 3 and 4, a delivery mechanism is provided by which the advantages of the use of corrugated material carriers are still further increased. The delivery of the heavy material takes place in this constructional form from the troughs of the corrugations. In consequence thereof, the major portion of the upper surface of the material carrier remains accessible to the free and unimpeded jigging action, an accumulation of the settled material taking place in the troughs of the corrugations. In this case, considerable economy in driving power is effected, because the water is not compelled to set the comparatively heavy settled material in motion.

An additional advantage is that a more rapid delivery of the settled material is set up in addition to the improved action of the upper surface of the material carrier. At the same time, considerably less grinding action takes place which must be regarded as a great advantage in the operation of concentration. In the present construction, the delivery of the settled material from the troughs of the corrugations is effected into a delivery receptacle placed at the side of the machine. The corrugated material carrier a is preferably arranged at a slight incline toward this receptacle in such a mannor that the channels or depressions formed run toward the wall Z) of the settling machine to which the receptacle 0 is attached. This latter is connected to the settling machine by a number of pipes (Z, which open inside the machine exactly over the bottom of the trough of each corrugation so that the settled material is compelled to pass into receptacle 0 by the shortest route and in proportion as the delivery.apparatus 0 arranged at the foot of this accumulating receptacle allows it to flow away.

To enable the machine to be worked conveniently, it is necessary that the delivery of the settled material shall be effected uniformly from all the troughs of the corrugations. This, however, can only be accomplished when the delivery of the settled material which collects in the accumulating receptacle is so regulated that the surface of the material forms a uniform plane which is situated at the same level as the delivery openings of the troughs, In order to eifect a uniform delivery of the settled material, damming devices are provided, which purpose is served by the inserted pieces marked 7. The particular way in which these latter are arranged and their shape depends upon the conditions of the particular work being done, The lateral delivery of the settled material employed in the present case possesses the great advantage that it enables the jigging process to be inspected and ac curately controlled. It is obvious of course that the delivery of the settled material may also be effected in other ways.

I claim:

1. A jigging machine, comprising a water receptacle, a stationary perforated carrier for exclusively supporting the materials to be separated mounted over said receptacle, said carrier having corrugations which act to increase the area of its operating surface, and means causing water from said receptacle to pass upward and downward through said perforations, the upward passage of the water serving to raise the. material and thereby effect the separation of the different materials on said carrier according to their specific gravities, substantially as described.

2. A jigging machine, comprising a water receptacle, a stationary perforated carrier for exclusively supporting the materials to be separated mounted over said receptacle, said carrier having corrugations which act to greatly increase the area of the operating surface of said carrier and the number of perforations for a given size of carrier, the said corrugations serving also to increase the strength of the carrier so that the latter is enabled to carry the whole load of the materials without the aid of a frame, and means for causing water to pass back and forth through said carrier in jerks to carry the various materials on said carrier upward to different heights according to their specific gravities, the various materials settling upon the carrier in diiferentlayers or zones according to their specific gravities, substantially as described.

3. A jigging machine, comprising a water receptacle, a stationary carrier for exclusively supporting the materials to be separated, said carrier having openings there through and being mounted over said receptacle, and means for passing a pulsating current of water from said receptacle upwardly and downwardly through said openings for producing the settling action, said carrier being formed with corrugations to increase the number of openings and reduce the resistance to the passage of the settling water through the carrier, substantially as described.

4:. A jigging machine, comprising a water receptacle, a substantially horizontal stationary carrier mounted over said receptacle and formed with a plurality of vertical folds or corrugations which increase the strength of the carrier so that the latter is enabled to carry the whole load of the materials to be separated without the aid of a frame, said folds or corrugations being perforated, the perforations in di ferent portions thereof extending in different directions to direct water jets against the materials on the carrier at difierent angles, to gether with means for forcing liquid upwardly through said perforations from said receptacle, substantially as described.

5. A jigging machine comprising a stationary corrugated carrier having through openings therein, a water supply, means for causing said water to pulsate through the said openings, and a discharge and regulating vessel adjacent to the settling machine adapted to receive the settled material from the carrier, the carrier being arranged to discharge the settled material at an angle to the direction in which the material is transported over the carrier; substantially as described.

6. A jigging machine comprising a stationary carrier having corrugations which increase the area of the carrier, there being a plurality of perforations through the carrier, means for pulsating water through said carrier, a discharge and regulating vessel extending longitudinally of the machine at the side thereof, there being openings through the side of the settling machine leading from the carrier into the discharge and regulating vessel, said openings being formed immediately above the corrugations in the carrier; substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses;

KARL SCHUCHARD.

Witnesses:

Dr. IGNATZ FRIEDMANN, lVoLnnsnin HAUPT.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, .D. G.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification209/457, 209/494, 209/486
Cooperative ClassificationB03B5/24