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Publication numberUS1099180 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1914
Filing dateJan 16, 1914
Priority dateJan 16, 1914
Publication numberUS 1099180 A, US 1099180A, US-A-1099180, US1099180 A, US1099180A
InventorsFrank Karacsonyi
Original AssigneeGergely Blaga, Frank Karacsonyi
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring-heel for shoes.
US 1099180 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. KARGSONYL SPRING HEEL FOB. SHOES. APPLIGATION Hmm JAN. 16,

A 11 9 1 9.. G D u 1u d 6 LIJ D e .TU a D..

E ,MNM

marga Irlllil)1 STATES PAJTENT` OFFC.

FRANK KARCSONYI, OF YONKERS, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR 0F ONE-THIRD TO GERGELY BLGA, OF HASTINGS-UPON-HUDSON. NEW YORK.

SPRING-HEEL FOR SHOES.

To @ZZ whom it may concern Be it known that I, FRANK KARCSONYI,

a subject of the King of Hungary, residing at Yonkers, in the county' of Westchester and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Spring-*Heels for Shoes, lowing is a specification.

rlhis invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in spring heels for shoes.

An object of the invention aims to relieve the strain and jars on the heel of the foot by providing a spring heel that will absorb such shocks.

A further object of the invention is to provide a spring heel especially adapted for army shoes where the wearer is subjected to excessive walking, the heel being uniformly cushioned to evenly distribute the wear.

With the above and other objects in view which will appear as the nature of the invention is better understood, the same consists in the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter more fully described and then claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawing by like characters throughout the several views and wherein Figure l is a perspective view of a shoe embodying my invention. Fig.` 2 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view of the heel illustrating the manner of cushioning the same. Fig. 3 is a horizontal sectional view of the heel, and, Fig. 4 is a sectional view of a portion of the `heel illustrating a manner of guiding' the telescoping sections.

Referring more particularly to the drawing accompanying this application, the reference letter S designates the shoe provided with the heel H. The heel H is provided with an extreme upper lift l0 and 11 while the intermediate sections are formed of metallic telescoping members suitably secured to the leather lifts. An inverted cup-shaped member 12 is secured t0 the upper lift 10 by fastening screws 13 and to be received within the cup-shaped member 12 is the upper telescoping section 14. and secured thereto by suitable fastening means as shown at 15. A plate 16 is received within the upper telescoping section 14 and retained therein by the fastening means 17 and dependino` from said plate 16 are the cylindrical members `18 open at their of which the fol` and lower leather i Patented J une 9, 1914. Serial No. 812,452.

lower ends. A transverse pin 19 extends across the lower end of the cylindrical members 1S for purposes to be hereinafterdescribed. Secured to the lower lift 11 by the fastening members 20 is the cup-shaped member 21 which is adapted to have a telescopic connection with the member 14:. Projecting upwardly from the cup member 21 are tubular members 22 of a diameter less than the cylindrical members 18 to provide for their reception therein. The tubular members 22 are provided with oppositelydisposed longitudinal slots 23 and disposed within said slots are the pins 19 carried by the cylindrical members 18. Mounted on the upper ends of each of the tubular members 22 are the disk members 22', each of said disk members supporting a coil spring 24 cal members 1S, engaging at its upper end the plate 1G and at its lower end. the disk members 22.

The parts above described will be effectively guided in their several movements, but to insure such guiding movement, means are provided as shown in Figpet, which consists of an angle plate 25 secured to one of the cylindrical members 18 as at 26 while its upper end is secured as at 27 to the plate 1G. rlhe lower end of the angle member 25 is provided with an opening in which is received a pin 28 carried by the lower cupshaped member 21.

In operation, the member 14 and cylindrical members 1.8 are moved in a downward direction which compresses the spring 24v and permits the members 14 and 21 to telescope. Vhen pressure is relieved on the upper lift 1.0, the spring 24C exerts itself and brings the telescoping sections to their normal position as shown in Fig. 1.

l/Vhile I have shown and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, I do not wish to confine myself thereto as various forms, modifications, and arrangements of `the parts may be had Without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is :-n

1. A spring heel for shoes, comprising an upper and a lower lift, an inverted cupsliaped member depending from the upper lift, a cup-shaped member end fitting within said depending member, a

compression disposed within the cylindri` having its upper plate within said depending member, cylin- Y extending vdrical members depending from said plate, a cup-shaped member secured to the lower lift ofthe heel, vertically slotted tubularA members projecting from the lower cup-shaped member', andtelescopically engaging within said cylindrical members, disks on said `tubular members, coil springs supported between said disks, and Vsaid plate,v and pins and movable in the slots of said tubular members.V p Y 1 2. ln a spring heel, the combination with two telescopically engagingl sections, one having depending cylindrical members, and

Copies of this patent may be obtained for seopic members,

within said cylindrical Vmembers,V Y

five cents each, `py addressing kthe 'Washingtoln D. C.

the other provided with upwardly projecting tubular members, of"verticalflydisposed coil-springs u supported `between the Vvtwo members, and guiding means comprising an angle 'bracket secured to one of said teleand a vertically-disposed guide pin secured to the other member and extending through an arm of said bracket.`

In testimony whereof l aii'iX my signature in presence of two witnesses.

FRANK KARACSONYI.; Witnesses: l

ADoLn KLEIN, 'SmvoIfLAV KARfcsoNYI. y

Commissioner of Patents,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2669038 *Nov 19, 1951Feb 16, 1954De Werth RobertShock absorbing shoe heel
US2807100 *Mar 16, 1956Sep 24, 1957Carl A WindleResilient heel construction
US5224278 *Sep 18, 1992Jul 6, 1993Jeon Pil DMidsole having a shock absorbing air bag
US5353523 *Oct 13, 1993Oct 11, 1994Nike, Inc.Shoe with an improved midsole
US5502901 *May 10, 1994Apr 2, 1996Brown; Jeffrey W.Shock reducing footwear and method of manufacture
US6487796Jan 2, 2001Dec 3, 2002Nike, Inc.Footwear with lateral stabilizing sole
US6880267Jan 28, 2004Apr 19, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US6898870Mar 20, 2002May 31, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole having support elements with compressible apertures
US6964120Nov 2, 2001Nov 15, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US6968636Apr 26, 2004Nov 29, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole with a stiffness adjustment mechanism
US7080467Jun 27, 2003Jul 25, 2006Reebok International Ltd.Cushioning sole for an article of footwear
US7082698Jan 8, 2003Aug 1, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US7213350Oct 10, 2003May 8, 2007B & B Technologies LpShock reducing footwear
US7401418Aug 17, 2005Jul 22, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US7493708Feb 18, 2005Feb 24, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with plate dividing a support column
US7533477Oct 3, 2005May 19, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7748141Jul 6, 2010Nike, IncArticle of footwear with support assemblies having elastomeric support columns
US7774955Apr 17, 2009Aug 17, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7810256Oct 12, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7841105Dec 7, 2009Nov 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US8104194 *Nov 8, 2007Jan 31, 2012Suk Koung KimShoes having impact absorption part
US8302234Apr 17, 2009Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8302328Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8312643Nov 20, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8656608Sep 13, 2012Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8893404 *Jan 19, 2012Nov 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Impact-attenuation systems for articles of footwear and other foot-receiving devices
US20020193498 *Apr 8, 2002Dec 19, 2002Brown Jeffrey W.Shock reducing footwear and method of manufacture
US20040107602 *Oct 10, 2003Jun 10, 2004B&B Technologies LpShock reducing footwear
US20040128860 *Jan 8, 2003Jul 8, 2004Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US20040181969 *Jan 28, 2004Sep 23, 2004Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US20040221483 *Nov 2, 2001Nov 11, 2004Mark CartierFootwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US20040261293 *Jun 27, 2003Dec 30, 2004Reebok International Ltd.Cushioning sole for an article of footwear
US20060185191 *Feb 18, 2005Aug 24, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with plate dividing a support column
US20070039204 *Aug 17, 2005Feb 22, 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US20070266592 *May 18, 2006Nov 22, 2007Smith Steven FArticle of Footwear with Support Assemblies having Elastomeric Support Columns
US20090199431 *Apr 17, 2009Aug 13, 2009Nike, Inc.Article Of Footwear With A Sole Structure Having Bluid-Filled Support Elements
US20100077636 *Apr 1, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US20100236093 *Nov 8, 2007Sep 23, 2010Suk Koung KimShoes having impact absorption part
US20110067263 *Nov 29, 2010Mar 24, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of Footwear Having Midsole with Support Pillars and Method of Manufacturing Same
US20120119426 *May 17, 2012Nike, Inc.Impact-Attenuation Systems for Articles of Footwear and Other Foot-Receiving Devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/38
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/30