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Publication numberUS1100867 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1914
Filing dateDec 23, 1913
Priority dateDec 23, 1913
Publication numberUS 1100867 A, US 1100867A, US-A-1100867, US1100867 A, US1100867A
InventorsMacdougald Dexter
Original AssigneeMacdougald Dexter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for transmitting and indicating fluctuating pressures of water, gas, and steam.
US 1100867 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'MAGDOUGALD DEXTER. APPARATUS FOR TRANSMITTING AND INDIGATING FEUGTUATIN G PRESSURES OF WATER, 'GAS,

' AND STEAM. urmonro'n FILED 1:20.23, 1913.

Patentd June 23,1914

UNITED sem O F C menoueann DEXTER, or oommnus, GEORGIA. I

APPARATUS FOR rmnsmrrrmo AND inn'rca'rme nucruarme rmsssunns or WATER,- eas, AND srmm.

Patented June 23, 1914.,v

Application filed December 23,1913. Serial No. 808,421.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, MACDOUGALD DEXTER,

a citizen of the United States, residing at Columbus, in the county of Muscogee and State of Georgia, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Apparatus for Transmitting and Indicating Fluctuatlng Pressures of Water, Gas, and Steam; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact descri tion of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art I to which it appertains to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters and figures of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

This inventionrelates to new and useful improvements in apparatus as, means of transmission of pressure due to the height of liquids or gas pressure from a given point to suitable indicating or recording gages and theobject in view is to afford means whereby the fluctuating heights of water or other liquid, or the pressure of gases which are compressible, may be transmitt-ed considerable distance and recorded or indicated upon gages and dispensing with the employment of yielding floats, diaphragms, etc.

My invention comprises a simple and efficient device of this nature having various details of construction which will be hereinafter fully described, shown in the accompanying drawings and then specifically de- 85 fined in the appended claims.

, I illustrate; my invention in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure l is a side elevation of the apparatus in which application is made to de- 40 termine the fluctuation of water in a stream or river, and Fig. 2 is a sectional view on line 22 of Fig. 1.

Reference now being, had to the details of the drawings by letter, A- designates a re-' ceptacle, comprising a sight receptacle, made preferably of transparent glass and adapted to contain oil or other liquid, the former being used preferably to avoid freezing. Said receptacle has closures B and C at its ends, the latter being provided'iwith aperdicating gage E. A frame, having a base pressed air or tures through one of which a pipe D passes, which may extend a considerable distance- -portion B and standards B is 'provided with a crosspiece B at its upper end which has apertures in registration with the apertures 1n the top C. A pipe H also asses through an aperture in the top of tl ie receptacle A, terminating as would also the e nd of the pipe D above the surface of the l1q1l1d., which is designated by letter I, and said lpe H, which may be of an suitable lengt extends down underneath t 1e surface of the water of a river, designated'by letter J, and its lower end is open and has a fixed position underneath the surface of the water ofthe river, the height of which is to'be measured, or, in the event of the pipe being used to transmitthe pressure of gas, the same would be correspondingly positioned withinthe gas. in the tank, or pipe.

, A pipe, designated b letter N, passes through an aperture in t e top of the rece tacle A and extends down underneath t e surface of the liquid within the receptacle with whichit communicates. A needle re ulating valve 0 is positioned within the plpe N and which pipe communicates .with a gage R and leading from the latter is a pipe S which communicates with a reducing governor T which may be of any well known construction'and with which governor-the pipe S communicates and through which com- A gas from any source may be lntroduced, the ressure from which may be determined by the gage R. o

In operation; the apparatus being adjusted as shown, compressed air or gas-is fed from the plpe S and passes through the reducing governor where the pressure/is reduced if'it fluctuates and aflording means. for--maintain1n aconstant pressure at the inlet of the nee le regulating valve 0. The pressure gage R, located intermediate the valve and the 'overnor-T, affords means of being assured that the pressurev of the air I or gas before reachinggthe needle valve is greater than the pressure of the fluid or gas to be measured. From the needle valve air or gas passes through into and makes exit from the lower end of the pipe N into the liquid, so that assurance may be had that the1 air or gas is being fed into the receptac e.

In the successful operation of my 'apparatus, two thingsare essential, first that the pressure supp y of gas ,or air. is sufficient, as shown by the gage R and that the valve 0 is open as is evidenced by the air or as bubbling up through the liquid and, if t is condition obtains, the pressure of the air orgas is necessarily greater than the pressure of either the gas or liquidto be transmitted and measured.

By the provision of an apparatus of this nature, it will be understood that, when compressed air or gas is introduced through the pipes to a sufiicient degree to equalize the hydrostatic pressure upon the liquid, the depth of the river may be indicated and the variations in the fluctuations of the pressure may be transmittedand read upon the gage at considerable distance, or, in the event of the apparatus being used in connection with either gas plants or .steam 1 apparatus where it is desired to indicate either high or low pressure, the latter may be transmitted and recorded at distant point of the system. It will be understood, therefore, that my apparatus will be equally effective for use whether the tube or pipe H lead to a point under water or other liquid or to any place containing the gas or steam having fluctuating pressures.

What I claim to be new is 1. An apparatus for. transmitting and indicating pressures upon liquids, gases, etc., comprising a receptacle adapted to contain a liquid a pipe adapted to communicate between the receptacle and the liquid or gas, the pressure of which is to be determined, a compressed air pipe communicating with the receptacle underneath the surface of the liquid therein, and a pipe leading from the receptacleabove the liquid therein and provided with an indicating gage, as set forth.

2. An apparatus for transmitting and indicating pressuresnpon liquids, gases, etc., comprising a receptacle adapted to contain a liquid, a pipe adapted to communicate be tween the receptacle above the surface of the liquid or gas therein, its other end positioned at astationary int underneath the surface of'the water, t e pressure of which is to be transmitted and determined, a pipe leading to and communicating with the re oeptacle underneath the surface of the liquid therein and through which compressed air is adapted to be introduced, and a pipe leading from the receptacle above the surface of its liquid and provided with an indicating gage, as set forth.

3. An apparatus for transmitting andindicating pressures upon liquids gases, etc., comprising a receptacle adapted to contain a liquid, a pipe designed to communicate between the receptacle above the surface of the liquid or gas therein and its other endpositioned at a stationary point underneath the surface of the water, the pressure of which is to be transmitted and determined, a pipeleading through the top of the receptacle and opening below the surface of the liquid therein and through which compressed air or gas is adapted to be introduced, a needle valve for regulating the flow of the compressed air, and a gage for indicating the air pressure, a pipe leading from the receptacle above the surface of the liquid andprovided with an indicating gage, as set forth..

4. An apparatus for transmitting and indicating pressures upon liquids, gases, etc., comprising a receptacle adapted to contain a liquid, a pipe designed-to communicate between the receptacle above the surface of the liquid or gas therein and its other end positioned at a stationary point underneath the surface of the water, the pressure of vided with an indicating gage, as set forth.

5. In combination with a transparent receptacle having closed ends, the upper of which is a-pertured, a frame upon which said receptacle rests, crosspieces engaging the top of the receptacle and having apertuI'es therein, a pipe leading through registering apertures in said crosspiece and top of the receptacle and communicating with the interior thereof and its other end extending to a fixed point and opening underneath the surface of the water, the pressure of which is to be transmitted and indicated, a compressed air pipe leading through registering a ertures in said crosspiece and top and-aapt-ed to communicate with the interior of the receptacle underneath the surface of the liquid therein,

and a pipe leading through the top of the re ceptacle and having an indicating gage therein, as set forth.

In .testimony whereof I hereunto affix my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

MAcDOUGALD DEXTER.

Witnesses:

J. J. PEAsn, GEORGE W. Cox.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2471026 *Sep 27, 1945May 24, 1949Eby Ivan DDevice for determining the depth of liquids
US2518484 *Jan 18, 1946Aug 15, 1950Matthews Joseph NApparatus for determining the depth of liquid in tanks
US2581427 *May 24, 1947Jan 8, 1952Matthews Joseph NLiquid level gauge for ballast tanks
US2609681 *May 13, 1948Sep 9, 1952Standard Oil Dev CoDrilling mud weight recorder
US2664747 *Aug 8, 1949Jan 5, 1954Davison Chemical CorpLiquid-solids interface indicator
US3246522 *Sep 13, 1963Apr 19, 1966Aluminium Lab LtdMethod for measuring pressure of gases
US3295374 *Mar 23, 1964Jan 3, 1967Yawata Iron & Steel CoMethod and device for measuring pressure of fluid in vessel
US3638490 *Jan 17, 1969Feb 1, 1972Buettner Carl FFluid flow measuring device
US3727459 *Jan 12, 1972Apr 17, 1973Buettner CMeans for accurately measuring and monitoring liquid flows
US3880110 *Jul 30, 1973Apr 29, 1975Loesch Claude EShaft operation monitor
US4407159 *Jan 19, 1981Oct 4, 1983Wytaniec Casimir SApparatus and method for detecting an interface from a remote location
US4474054 *Jan 17, 1983Oct 2, 1984Ainlay John ALeak detector for underground storage tanks
US4561291 *Aug 10, 1984Dec 31, 1985Ainlay John ALeak detector for underground storage tanks
US5063783 *Aug 14, 1990Nov 12, 1991John ZajacPressure monitoring and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/302
Cooperative ClassificationG01F23/167