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Publication numberUS1101745 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1914
Filing dateJan 23, 1911
Priority dateJan 23, 1911
Publication numberUS 1101745 A, US 1101745A, US-A-1101745, US1101745 A, US1101745A
InventorsJohn A Jones
Original AssigneeLevi P Hazen, John A Jones
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metal window-sash.
US 1101745 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. A. JONES.

METAL WINDOW SASH.

APPLICATION FILED JAN 23, 1911. L I lglfli fifis Patenbed June 80, 191%.

3 SHEETS-*SHEET 1 mawvlio o J. A JONES.

METAL WINDOW SASH.

APPLICATIOH FILED JAN. 23, 1911.

Patenteoi June 80, 1914.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

J. A. JONE8.

METAL WINDOW SASH.

APPLICATION FILED JAN. 23, 191 1.

Patented June 30, 1914;.

3 SHEETSSHEET 3.

// Ill! FEED Fdlihiftlfid PATENT FFFQ.

JOHN A. JGNES, 6F GINCINNA I, OHIO, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF TO LEVI P. HAZEN, 0F CINCINNATI, OHIO.

METAL wmnow-sAsH.

has for an object to produce an improved metal window sash.

A further object is to produce a metal window sash provided with improved means for securing the panes of glass in place in the sash.

A further object is to produce a double sash for windows, in which one sash is easily I removable from the other, for the purpose of obtaining access to the glass in each sash. A further obJect is to produce a metal sash for windows, in which the separate parts forming the sash are separately formed and are capable of being easily assembled.

A further object of my invention is to pro i-ace means for protecting the metal members of the sash from extreme heat, which i arrangement of an aperture member for the reception of a transverse.

may be occasioned by fire, and to consequently prevent the window sash from warpin with which it may be provided.

These and other objects I attain by means of apparatus embodying the features herein described, and illustrated in the drawings accompanying this application and forming a part thereof.

In the drawings: Figure 1 is a perspective view of a sash embodying my invention,'the

interior face of the sash being shown. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the sash shown in Fig. l, and shows the exterior face of the sash. Fig. 3 is a perspective View of a por tion of an upright member which forms a detail of my invention, and illustrates the transverse or horizontal member,- which forms a part of my invention. Fig. 5 1s a perspective view of a pbrtion ot a vertical andahorizontal, member, and illustrates the means employed for securing the members together. FlgZ-Gdsfl perspective view of a portion of an intermediate vertical member and the op horizontal. member, and illuss trates the means employed for connecting I Specification of Letters Patent.

and breaking out the fireproof glass,

provided in the Patented June 30, 1 .914.

Application filed January 23, 1911.. Serial No. 604,057.

them together. Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a portion of a lateral vertical member and an intermediate horizontal member, and illustrates the means employed for securing the members together and also for securing a pane of glass to the sash. Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a portion of a to and a lateral member of'the sash, and il ustrates the means employed for securing them to gether and for securing a pane of glass to the sash. Fig. 9 is a partial sectional view of a sash embodying my invention, and is taken on the line 9-9 of Fig. Fig. 10 1s a fragmental sectional view of a sash embodying my invention, is taken on the line 1010 of Fig. 5, and illustrates the means employed for securing two sashes together, v

for the purpose of forming a double sash.

perspective view of a window sash provided with a fireproof casing or frame, which forms a part of my invention. Fig. 13 is a partial sectional View along the line 1313 of Fig. 12, and illustrates the method employed in securing the separateparts of the fireproof casing in place on the metal members of the window sash. Fig. 14 is a partial sectional view along the line 14.14 of Fig. 12: Fig. 15 is a partial sectional view along the line 15-15 of Fig. 12, and Fig. 16 is a perspective view of an intermediate spacer employed. for holding the fireproof casing in place on its mounting member.

The sash illustrated as an embodiment of my invention includes horizontal and vertical members, which may be cut from rolled or stamped sections and are so formed that they may be fitted together in the assembling operation sash.

The intermediate and vertical members 12 are substantially T-shaped in cross. section, and the flange 13 of each member is provided at each edge with alongit'udinally ex- 100 tending flange M, which projects at, right angles to the flange .13 and. parallel to the web 15 of the member. The web 15 is provided with apertures 16., located at the points of connection between the vertical 165 members 12 and the horizontal intermediate members 17. The flanges 14 are. provided with notches '18, which are located adj wilt to and in line with the apertures 16. The

to form a rigid and strong metal apertures lti are irregular in shape, their 1w members and perimeters corresponding in shape to the contour of the surface of the horizontal members 17.

The intermediate horizontal members 17, as illustrated, consist of a web 19, a base 20 extending at right angles to the web, an upwardly projecting flange 21 formed on the Web adjacent to the base 20, and a down- Wardly projecting flange 22 formed on the free edge of the web. The base 20 projects considerably below the web 19, but only a short distance above it.

In assembling the intermediate horizontal and vertical members, the horizontal members are inserted into the apertures, 16 and are moved through the apertures, to the proper positions with reference to the vertical members. The apertures 16 are so located in the webs 15 of the vertical members,

that the rear face of the base 20 of each horizontal member 17 contacts with the forward faces of the flanges 13 of the T-shaped zontal and vertical members are assembled.

The lugs 23 are formed by partially severing longitudinally extending strips from the lower edge of the base portion 20 of the horizontal members. and then in bending the severed strips to abnormal, positions, after the members are assembled, so that the severed ends of the strips engage the vertical revent relative motion be,- tween the mem ers. The vertical members the sash, are practically of the same con struction as the intermediate members 12. The only difl'erences are that the webs 15 ofthe members 24: are wider than the webs of the members 12, and the apertures, 25, which correspond to the apertures, 16, are rectangular instead of irregular. The top and bottom members 26 of each sash are somewhat difierentfrom the intermediate hori zontal members 17, since they are substantially T-shaped in'cross-section, the web 27 of the T-shaped member being the same width as' the webs 15 of the members 24:. The Webs 27 of the top and bottom members 26 are provided with apertures, through which tongues 29, formed on the vertical members, project. The tongues 29 are provided with slots 30, in which wedges are located.' The wedges 31 rigidly clamp the top and bottom members in place on the frame. when thy are driven home. The horizontal members 17 are previdcd with tongues 22, which project through the apertures 25 in the lateral members 24, and are secured in place by means 01'? the slot and Wedge connection, illustrated. The top and bottom aromas members 26 are provided with lugs and 34:, which cooperate with the ends of the lateral members 2 1 and secure them in place.

The window panes are secured in place in the separate frames formed by the intersecting members of the sash, as follows: The lower end of each pane 35 is inserted into the channel formed by the upwardly projecting flange 21 and the upwardly projecting portion of the base 20 of the member '17, which forms the base of the inclosing frame of the pane; the pane is then move about its lower and supported edge, so that its upper edge contacts with the downwardly projecting portion of the base 20 of the member 17, which forms the top of the inclosing frame. The top and lateral edges of each pane are secured in place by means of clips 87, which perform the function of glaziers brads. A clip 87 is illustrated in Fig. 11, and consists of an L-shaped piece formed of sheet metal; preferably tin, with one leg 38 longer than the other leg 39. Slits 40 and 41 are cut in the opposite edges of the leg 38, so that the corners of the piece may be turned at right angles, for the purpose of forming lugs for securing the glass in place. The slit 40 is located at a greater distance from the angle of the clip, so that the lug formed by it can be employed in securing agreater thickness efgglass implace on the sash-than the lug formed by the slit 4:1. The leg 39 of each clip is of-substantially the same length as the distance between the flanges 14c and, the webs15 on the vertical members; and the leg 38 is of substantially the same length as the distance between the base 20 and the flange 22 on the horizontal members 17.' The clips are secured in place on the vertical members by inserting the legs "39 into the channels formed between the Webs l5 and the flanges 1 1 and then forcing the leg 38 against the web 15. Theclips are secured in-place on the horizontal members 17 by inserting the leg 38 into the channel formed between the base 20 and the.

flange 22 on each member 17, and then torcing the leg 39 into contact with the web 19. The clips are secured in place on the members before the panes 35are located in place, and the glass-holding lugs are then formed on the clips by bending one corner or the other at right angles, so that the severed portion contacts with the face of the glassat the edge of the pane. After each pane is secured in place by means of'the clips, it may be puttied in the usual manner. I preferably insert putty into the channels formed between the upper edges of the base portions 20 and the flanges 21 of the horizontal members. prior to inserting the lower edges of the pancsinto the channels. By this means, 1' am able -to obtain a water-tight joint be tween the lower edges of the glass and the sash. The puttying operation covers the memes clips, and consequently holds them in place. removing the glass from the sash, the putty is removed in the usual way and the distorted corners of the clips are bent to their normal positions, so as to free the edges of the glass, and each pane of glass is then removed. The clips areremovable and consequently may be withdrawn from their mounting channels, without in any way damaging either the clips or the sash. Drainage notches 42 are provided ,in the upper edges of the base portions of the horizontal members, so that water which lodges on the sash between the bases 20 and the glass will drain out.

In Fig. 10, l have shown-a sectional view illustrating means for securing an auxiliary.

or inner sash 43 on to the outer'sash. The iianer sash 43 is composed of intersecting vertical and horizontal members 44 and 4:5. The horizontal members 414: are substantially the same as the horizontal members 17 of the outer sash, the only difference being in the width of the web 19. The vertical men1- hers -13 are substantially the same as the vertical members 12 of the outer sash, and

'znember is provided with a slot 16 stormed in the rear face of its flange, for the purpose of receiving the edge of a web 15 of one of the vertical members 12 in the operation of locking the inner sash in lace'on the outer sash. Brackets 47 ale-"s own as integrally formed with the vertical members at, and are provided at their ends with downwardly projecting lugs 458, which are adapted-to'project into apertures 19 formed in the web portions of the horizontal members ol' the outer sash, and to secure the inner sash in place. With this construction, the inner sash can be easily secured to the outer sash and can also be easily removed from it. The upper ends of the vertical members 13 or the inner sash are notched, as shown, at 50, so that the lugs 428 can be introduced into the apertures 4:9. The vertical and horizontal members 4A and are secured together in the same manner as the intersecting members of: the outer sash.

lln the drawings, 1' have illustrated a heat insulating or fireproof frame, which is adapted to protect the metal members of the sash from heat which may be occasioned by a the on the exterior of a building equipped with metal window sash.

The fireproof casing or frame, illustrated in Figs. 12 to 16 inclusive as an embodiment of a feature of my invention consists of short channel-shaped pieces 51, adapted to be mounted on the backs or bases of the horizontal members 17 channel-shaped pieces 52, adapted to be mounted on the backs or bases of. the horizontal members 15; and

channel-shaped pieces 53, which form the bounding members '01 the fireproof frame, endure adapted tube mounted on the outer the window sash.

or bounding members of the window sash.

The flanges of each short-piece 51 are so formed at their edges, that they will engage the base portion 20 of the members 17 and the pieces are located in place on the members 17, during the operation of assembling The ends of the pieces abut against the flanges 11 of the members 15 and may be cut so that they fit over the flanges. ,The edge of the lower flange of each piece 51 is pressed, or otherwise formed, so that it provides a longitudinally extend ing recess 54-, which is adapted to receive the lower edge of the base portion 20 of one of the members 17. The edge of the upper flange of each piece 51 is so bent, or formed, that it engages the upper edge ofthc base portion 20 and cooperates with the recess 51 in holding the piece 51 in place on the base portion 20 of the member 17 In addition to this, spacers 55, illustrated in Fig. 16, may be located in the channel-shaped pieces 51, and by hearing against the base portion and against the inner face of the channelshaped pieces, hold the pieces in place. The spacers may be located at desired distances apart along the base portions 20. The upper flange of each piece 51 is extended, so that it fits snugly against the adjacent face of the member 17, and so that it extends along and contacts with the lateral face of the projecting flange 21 of the member 17. The purpose of this construction is to prevent water from collecting between theflange and the mounting member. The pieces 51 abut at each end against the sides of the vertical pieces 52. Each piece 52 is secured to its supporting member 15 by bending over the edges of its flanges, so that each flange engages one of the flanges 1 1 of the mounting member. The spacing pieces 55 are located between the base portion of each member 15 and the piece 52, and by holding the piece'outwardly, draw the bent over flanges into engagement with the flanges 1e, and thereby secure the pieces in place. One flange of each of the horizontal members 53 may be notched out for the purpose of receiving the e: ids of the vertical members 52. The edges of the flanges of the horizontal pieces 53 are arranged to engage the base portions of the members 26 of the window sash, the arrangement being similarto that illustrated in Fig. 13, in connection with piece 52. One

flange of each vertical member 53 is notched out to receive the ends of the pieces 51 and the pieces 53 are secured in place on the mounting members in the same manner that the pieces 52 are secured in place. Thetops and the bottoms of the vertical members 58 are bent inwardly, so as to strengthen the member, and also to partiallyclose the channel. Rods 56 extend longitudinally through the members 51, and are adapted to secure the separate pieces of the fireproof frame together. The rods are held in place by means of nuts 57, which are threaded on to.

the ends of the rods, and are seated-upon the outer flanges of the vertical members 53. By tightening up the nuts, the members 51 and 53 are locked securely together, and the,

, members 52 are consequently held in place.

It willbe apparent that the frame when in place on the window sash incloses the exposed portion of each metal member of thesash, and incloses the exposed portion in and, consequently, insu-.

an air chamber, lates it from heat, which may be occasioned by fire on the outside of the building, in which the Window sash is located. In addi tion to this, the operative casing protects the metal members of the sash from rapid variations in the temperature, which might be occasioned during a fire byexposing the.

metal members first to the heat of the fire, and then to the temperature of the water employed in fighting the fire. The casing, therefore, protects the metal members and prevents warping of the members, and a resultant breaking of the glass with which the sash may be provided. I

lVhat I claim is 1. A metal sash for windows provided with clip-receiving channels, and glass-holding clips removably mounted in said channels and comprising L-shaped pieces provided with partially severed corners adapt-.

ed to be bent to form lugs.

2. A metal window sash, comprising an inner sash and an outer sash, both of said sashes consisting of horizontal and vertical members, the horizontal members of the outer sash having inwardly projecting horizontal flanges and a series of perforations in said flanges, and the vertical members of the inner sash having outwardly projecting brackets adapted to enter the aforesaid perforations. i

3. A metal window sash provided With a lower horizontal member having two upwardly projecting flanges adapted to receive the lower edge of a window pane, the outer flange being notched to drain water from thepane. 1

4:. In combination With a metal .,.W1I 1do,w sash, a heat insulating frame comprising separate channel-shapedpieces, With their edges formed to engage the horizontal and and located at difierent distances from the angle of the c1ip, and forming partially severed portions' adapted to be bent to form glass-holding lugs.

7. A metal sash for windows comprising intersecting members provided with clipreceiving c iannels, clips provided with legs of different lengths for engaging the channels and slits located in opposite edges of one of the legs and at difierent distancesfrom the angle of the clip for partially severing the corners of the clip and forming lugs adapted to be bent into holding engage ment with the glass.

JOHN A. JONES. Witnesses:

WALTER F. MURRAY, PERIN W. SCARBOROUGH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2475885 *Jun 6, 1945Jul 12, 1949E K Geyser CompanyWindow
US2554418 *May 17, 1946May 22, 1951Build Corp UPrefabricated house structure
US2576840 *Nov 7, 1946Nov 27, 1951Victor M LangsettMuntin and cross joint anchorage
US2706541 *Nov 17, 1950Apr 19, 1955Virginia Metal Products IncMetallic partition structure
US2827196 *Jul 28, 1955Mar 18, 1958Stone City Machine And Tool CoMilk crate partition
US2889899 *Jun 30, 1953Jun 9, 1959Burch CompanyMetal door construction
US2936049 *May 17, 1956May 10, 1960Nat Gypsum CoStud shoe clip
US3023861 *Feb 13, 1961Mar 6, 1962Rollform IncTall-form construction for a coustical ceilings
US3047913 *Jan 28, 1959Aug 7, 1962Frank CooksWindow construction
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US4860517 *Apr 27, 1988Aug 29, 1989Hulett Aluminium LimitedFramework structure for windows and doors
US5784850 *Nov 10, 1994Jul 28, 1998Elderson; William L.Stud wall system and method using spacer member
US5813187 *Jun 27, 1997Sep 29, 1998Lee; Ming-KunMetal barrier for a window or door for prohibiting burglars from breaking in
US6021618 *Jan 30, 1998Feb 8, 2000Elderson; William L.Stud wall system and method using spacer member
US6694695Aug 27, 2001Feb 24, 2004Dietrich Industries, Inc.Wall stud spacer system with spacer retainers
US6708460Mar 5, 2000Mar 23, 2004Dietrich Industries, Inc.Stud wall system and method using a combined bridging and spacing device
US6920734Jun 25, 2001Jul 26, 2005Dietrich Industries, Inc.Bridging system for off-module studs
US7017310Mar 6, 2003Mar 28, 2006Dietrich Industries, Inc.Spacer bar retainers and methods for retaining spacer bars in metal wall studs
US7159369 *Aug 14, 2003Jan 9, 2007Dietrich Industries, Inc.Stud wall system and method using combined bridging and spacing device
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US7373763 *Nov 10, 2003May 20, 2008Extech/Exterior Technologies, Inc.Glass block assembly
US7685782Dec 9, 2005Mar 30, 2010Newell Operating CompanyMuntin clip
US7694470Dec 9, 2005Apr 13, 2010Newell Operating CompanyMuntin clip
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US8590255Oct 26, 2011Nov 26, 2013Larry Randall DaudetBridging connector
US8813456Oct 24, 2013Aug 26, 2014Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Bridging connector
US9016024Nov 27, 2013Apr 28, 2015Simpson Strong-Tie CompanySteel framing clip
US20040172912 *Mar 6, 2003Sep 9, 2004Brunt James WilsonSpacer bar retainers and methods for retaining spacer bars in metal wall studs
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USD732708Dec 30, 2013Jun 23, 2015Simpson Strong-Tie CompanyFlared joist and rafter connector
WO2000066844A2 *May 3, 2000Nov 9, 2000Elderson William LStud wall system and method using combined bridging and spacing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/456, 52/667
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/685