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Publication numberUS1102510 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1914
Filing dateApr 1, 1913
Priority dateJul 15, 1911
Publication numberUS 1102510 A, US 1102510A, US-A-1102510, US1102510 A, US1102510A
InventorsDavid J Irish
Original AssigneeBabcock & Wilcox Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for burning finely-divided fuel.
US 1102510 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. J. IRISH.

APPARATUS FOR BURNING FINELY DIVIDED FUEL.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 1, 1913.

Patented July 7, 1914.

2 SHEETSSHEET l WI T IVESSES:

D. J. IRISH.

APPARATUS FOR BURNING FINBLY DIVIDED FUEL. APPLICATION FILED APR. 1, 191a.

1,108,51Q Patented July 7,1914,

2 SHEETS4SHEET 2.

I 1 Mfl ATTOR/VEVL tinuous,

resultmgln severe vibrations in the furnace.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE. I

DAVID J. IRISH, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNORTO 'I'HE BABCOCK & WILOOX COMPANY, I

OF BAYONNE, NEW JERSEY,

A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

APPARATUS FOR BURNING FINELY-DIVIDED FUEL.

Original application filed Ju y 15,

Specification of Letters Patent.

1913. Serial No. 758,088.

my application Serial No. 638,687, filed July The invention herein described relates to a plate for deflect-ing the air entering a combustion chamber around an atomizer or socalled burner, and to the general arrangement and construction of apparatus and devices employed for atomizing and burning liquid fuel. d

The invention will be understood by reference to the accompanying drawings in which- Figure 1 is a front elevation of one form of an air deflecting plate embodying my invention; Fig. 2 a section on the plane of the line 2-2 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 an'edge view of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 the blank from which the blades of Fig. 1 are made; Fig. 5 an edge view of Fig. 4 after bending; Fig. 6 an end view of the same blade (Fig. 5) to show how the blade is twisted or bent to form two a-ngles; Fig. 7 a front elevation of a modified form of deflecting plate; Fig.8 a section on the plane of the line 8-8 of Fig. 7; Fig. 9 a front elevation of a furnace showing the application of the air deflecting'plate and burner thereto; and Fig. 10 a longitudinal section of a portion of the furnace.

Similar reference numerals indicate similar parts inthe several views.

The prime ing finely divided fuel is to obtain a continuous, intimate and thorough mixture of the fuel and an amount of air as nearly as possible equal to the theoretical quantity required to effect complete combustion. If the mixing process is not uniform and conintermittent explosions take place If the mixture is not thoroughly efl'ected a large excess of air is required with resultant loss in elliciency.

' The object of the present invention is to.

obj ect of all methods of burnsecure acontinuous, uniform and intimate mixture of the air and fuel so as to secure substantially uniform and-complete combustion. This is accomplished by admitting the air for combustion around the burner and deflecting it from its normal direction of travel by a substantially flat plate comprising two or more concentrically arranged sets of blades inclined to the plane of the plate, the blades of one set being inclined in a direction opposite the direction of inclination of the adjacent set, thereby causing concentric whirling air currents to move in opposite direct-ions to thoroughly mix with the fuel. The blades of each set are spaced apart so as to provide openings for the admission of the air to the fuel.

As the result of experience I have determined upon an angle ofincl-ination of the blades of 45 to the plane of their supporting plate as giving the best results. This angle, however, can be varied according to the fuel or which the burner may be applied. blades which cause the deflection of the air are susceptible of various modifications coming within the scope of my invention, as for example, they may be cast integral with a supporting plate, or may be secured thereto in fixed relation to one another and to the plate.

For the purpose of illustration, I have shown my invention as applied to a boiler furnace. Any suitable form of atomizer or so-called burner may be used, such for example, as that shown in United States Patent No. 1,007,793 dated November 7, 1911 The ourner is connected to a supply pipe 1 and terminates in proximit to a central opening in the plate, and pre erably in front of the plate, as shown in Fig.2, so that the deflection of the air will begin after the air has passed the plane of the end of the burner. In the burners used by me the fuel,

as it is projected into the combustion chamber, assumes a conical shape and to eflect the desired intimate mixture therewith of the air necessary for complete combustion, I provide means comprising blades arranged as above stated to thereby cause concentric Patented Ju1 '7,1o14. 1911, Serial No. 638,687. Divided and this application filed April 1,

the character of the furnace to I The currents of air to be produced whirlingin opposite directions. These blades which effeet a change in the direct on of the travel of the air may be set in any suitable manner in an opening provided for the same in the furnace wall. I prefer, however, to mount them on a plate, either integral with the plate or secured thereto by any suitable means. By employing a plate to which the blades are secured they may be conveniently handled and mounted in the furnace wall.

Referring to Figs. 1, 2 and 3 one form of plate is shown comprising a frame 2, to which the outer ends of the blades are secured, the inner ends of the blades being attached to a ring 3 forming a central opening for the burner, or through which the fuel'may be projected. The blades are made from sheet metal, the blank being shown in Fig. 4. This blank is folded over flat on itself on the line 4 through 180. The end 5 is then turned up 90 on the line 6 and the end' 7 is turned down on the line 8 through 90. The planes of the portions 5 and 7 of the blade are at right angles to each other so that when a blade so constructed is set into the plate with the section 5 thereof at an angle of 45 to the plane of the plate, the plane of the other section 7 will be at a like angle to the plane of the plate but inclined in an opposite direction. In this construction the air for combustion is divided into two currents traveling. one within the other in opposite directions.

Instead' of making the blades of sheet metal and securing them to the plate I may make them in the form of a "casting divided into two or more concentric sections,

the blades of contiguous sections being inclined in opposite dlrections. Thus in Figs. 7 and 8 I have shown a sections the innermost 9 aving the blades inclined so as to causea whirling of the air in a right-handed direction; the second or middle section 10 having the blades inclined to cause the air to whirl in a left-handed direction; and the blades of the outermost section 11 being inclined similar to. the innermost. It is to be understood that the plate may have as many sections as may be desired, and" that the blades may be inclined to the plane of the plate at any desired angle depending upon the character of the fuel, or the particular furnace with which the plate is used. The currents of air through the openingsbetween the blades may duced by the stack draft or by a .forced draft. In Figs. 9 and 10 I have shown an application of the invention with a forced draft, the air duct 12 leading from any suitable source of supply terminating at the furnace front to completely inclose the deflecting plate. The combustion chamber is shown as below a water tube boiler having a bank of inclined tubes 13. As the inner ends of the blades terminate in close proximity to the burner the whirlin rents of air in opposite directions begins plate having three be inmotion of the cur immediately after the current of air passes the substantially flat deflecting plate, so that the issuing stream of fuel is surrounded, intermingled with and thoroughly broken up by the whirling masses of air practically immediately after it is ejected from the burner.

As above stated'the deflecting plate is substantially flat and, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2,

the blades are wider at their outer than at their inner ends. The whirling columns of air surround the non-whirling column passing through ring 3 which in turn encompasses the spray of fuel at the start, after which the inner column is whirled by contact with the column of air deflected by blades 7. Also as shown in Fig. 1 the'blades are set radially, the inner ends of the inner set terminating in the ring 3 which provides a central opening.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United. States is 1. The combination witha burner, of an air deflecting .device consisting of a sub stantially flat plate havinga central opening and comprising concentrically arranged sets of blades, the blades in the individual sets being substantially flat from their exterior to their interior edges and spaced apart to provide apertures for the admission of air and inclined to the plane of the'plate, the blades of one set inclined in a direction opposite to the direction of inclination of the blades of the adjacent set, the inner ends of the inner set of blades terminating adjacent said central opening, and said burner terminating in proximity to said opening.

2. The combination with a burner, of an air deflecting device consisting of a substantially flat plate having a central opening and comprising concentrically arranged sets of blades, said blades being spaced apart to provide apertures for the admission of air and inclined'to the plane of the plate, the blades of one set inclined in a direction 0 site to the direction of inclination of t elades of the adjacent set, said blades being wider at their outer than at their inner ends and the inner ends of the inner set of blades terminating adjacent said central opening, and said burner terminating in proximity to said opening.

3. The combination with a burner, of an air deflectin device consisting of a substantially flat p ate having a central opening and comprising concentrically arranged sets of blades, the blades in the individual sets being substantially flat from their exterior to their interior edges and spaced apart to provide apertures for the admission of air and inclined substantially 45 to the plane of the plate, the blades of one set inclined in a direction opposite to the direction of inclination of the blades of the adjacent set, the inner ends of the inner set of blades terminating adjacent said central opening, and said burner terminating in proximity to said opening. v 4

4. The combination With a burner, of an air deflecting device consisting of a' plate having a central opening and a plurality of blades radially arranged and coaxial with said burner, said blades being divided into concentrically arranged sets and inclined to the plane of the plate and spaced apart to provide apertures for the admission of air, the blades in the individual sets beingsubstantially flat from their exterior to their interior edges and the blades of one set inopening, and said burner terminating in proximity to said opening.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

DAVID J. IRISH.

Witnesses M. E. MCNINCH, CHARLES S. JONES.

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US2526220 *Jul 18, 1947Oct 17, 1950Daniel And Florence GuggenheimSpray nozzle
US2607191 *Nov 28, 1947Aug 19, 1952United Aircraft CorpVortex producing mechanism for mixing combustion chamber fluids
US2609869 *Dec 21, 1950Sep 9, 1952Monarch Mfg Works IncAir admission director for oil burners
US2654996 *Sep 6, 1949Oct 13, 1953Oerlikon MaschfGas turbine combustion chamber
US2800768 *Aug 19, 1954Jul 30, 1957United Aircraft CorpBurner construction
US3285316 *Jan 27, 1964Nov 15, 1966Delavan Mfg CompanyOil burning combustion head
US5055030 *Jun 23, 1989Oct 8, 1991Phillips Petroleum CompanyMethod for the recovery of hydrocarbons
US5267851 *Mar 16, 1992Dec 7, 1993General Electric CompanySwirl gutters for isolating flow fields for combustion enhancement at non-baseload operating conditions
US6036480 *Apr 1, 1998Mar 14, 2000Aos Holding CompanyCombustion burner for a water heater
US6983645May 15, 2003Jan 10, 2006Southwest Research InstituteMethod for accelerated aging of catalytic converters incorporating engine cold start simulation
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US7748976Mar 16, 2006Jul 6, 2010Southwest Research InstituteUse of recirculated exhaust gas in a burner-based exhaust generation system for reduced fuel consumption and for cooling
US7753677 *Aug 20, 2003Jul 13, 2010Siemens AktiengesellschaftBurner
US8425224Mar 16, 2006Apr 23, 2013Southwest Research InstituteMass air flow compensation for burner-based exhaust gas generation system
US20030079520 *Aug 6, 2002May 1, 2003Ingalls Melvin N.Method and apparatus for testing catalytic converter durability
US20040007056 *Jun 10, 2003Jan 15, 2004Webb Cynthia C.Method for testing catalytic converter durability
US20040025580 *May 15, 2003Feb 12, 2004Webb Cynthia C.Method for accelerated aging of catalytic converters incorporating engine cold start simulation
US20040028588 *Jun 10, 2003Feb 12, 2004Webb Cynthia C.Method for accelerated aging of catalytic converters incorporating injection of volatilized lubricant
US20050039524 *Aug 12, 2004Feb 24, 2005Southwest Research InstituteTesting using a non-engine based test system and exhaust product comprising alternative fuel exhaust
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US20060035188 *Aug 20, 2003Feb 16, 2006Peter BerenbrinkBurner
US20060201239 *May 25, 2006Sep 14, 2006Webb Cynthia CMethod for Testing Catalytic Converter Durability
US20060234174 *Mar 16, 2006Oct 19, 2006Southwest Research Institute.Use of recirculated exhaust gas in a burner-based exhaust generation system for reduced fuel consumption and for cooling
US20070039381 *Aug 4, 2006Feb 22, 2007Timmons Suzanne ASecondary Air Injector For Use With Exhaust Gas Simulation System
US20070283749 *Jan 6, 2006Dec 13, 2007Southwest Research InstituteSystem and method for burner-based accelerated aging of emissions control device, with engine cycle having cold start and warm up modes
US20070289290 *Jun 20, 2007Dec 20, 2007Bartley Gordon J JSystem and method for producing diesel exhaust for testing diesel engine aftertreatment devices
US20080070169 *Sep 6, 2006Mar 20, 2008Ingalls Melvin NMethod and apparatus for testing catalytic converter durability
WO1998044293A2 *Apr 1, 1998Oct 8, 1998Aos Holding CoCombustion burner for a water heater
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/183, 159/4.2
Cooperative ClassificationF23D11/00