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Publication numberUS1102738 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1914
Filing dateMay 17, 1913
Priority dateMay 17, 1913
Publication numberUS 1102738 A, US 1102738A, US-A-1102738, US1102738 A, US1102738A
InventorsHenry Howard Greenway, Alfred Henry Piper Lowry
Original AssigneeHenry Howard Greenway, Alfred Henry Piper Lowry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ore concentration.
US 1102738 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY HOWARD GREENWAY, 0F CLARE, SOUTH AUSTRALIA, ,AIND ALFRED HENRY PIPER LOWRY, 0F PRAHRAN, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

our: CONCENTRATION. I

No Drawing.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that we, HENRY HOWARD GREENWAY, analytical chemist and metallurgist, of Clare, State of South Australia, Commonwealth 34 Queen street, Melbourne, State of Victoria, Commonwealth of Australia, and AL- rano HENRY PIPER LOWRY, metallurgist, of Lynzala, Highstreet, Prahran, State of Victoria aforesaid, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in ()re Goncentration, of which the following is a specification.

This invention'relates to improvements in ore concentration and has for its object the separationof various metallic snlfids from each other by means of flotation separation.

In this specification theword ores is intended to include concentrates, tailings slimes or other products containing mixed metallic sulfids.

\Ve have discovered that if. a salt of chromium (such as sodium bichromate or potassium bichromate) is introduced in solution into the circuit liquors, or if the material to be treated is subjected to the action of such chromium salt solution by digestion or otherwise that the sulfids are afiected in such a way as to leave certain of them amenable to flotation separation while certain other of them are rendered relatively not amenable to flotation whereby products are obtained relatively high in certain sulfids on the one hand and relatively high in other sultids on the other hand.

According to this invention the mixed sulfid ores after pulverization are introduced into water containing in solution, a salt of chromium (such as sodium or potassium biehromate) and also a small percentage of an air emulsifying agent for example an essential oil (say eucalyptus) and the mixture is thoroughly agitated and submitted to a flotation separation, the result of which is to cause certain of the sulfids to float in the form of a froth or scum which can be sepa- I rated by any well known means, leaving in the residue the other sulfids which are not susceptible to flotation.

In some instances it may be advisable to digest the pulverized mixed sulfid ores in water containing in solution a salt of chromium (such as sodium bichromate or potassium bichromate) and after removing the surplus solution subsequently submitting the Specification of Letters Patent.

of Australia, at present ofv Patented July '7, 1914.

Application filed May 17, 1913. Serial No. 768,374.

substances referred to.

The following are examples of the application of this invention (1.) A molybdenum ore containing 15% molybdenite and 25% iron pyrites was crushed to pass 100 mesh, and then subjected to froth flotation treatment in apparatus of well known type by being first of all vigorously agitated with four times its weight of water at 120 F. containing in solution 0.25% ofsodium bi'chromate to which was added. eucalyptus oilv in the proportion of one pound per ton of ore treated. The flotation product obtained from this operation consisted of a concentrate containing 93% molybdenite and 4.9% iron pyrites.

(2.) A copper ore containing 6.5% copper and 35% iron was crushed to pass 100 mesh. This was digested in a hot solution containing 1% sodium bichromate for a period of about 30 minutes. The digest-ion liquor was then decanted and the material was subjected to froth flotation separation using water only to which was added a frothing agent (viz, eucalyptus oil) in the propertion of 1 pound per ton of material treated, pro ducing a flotation product containing 19% copper and 30.2% iron, leaving a residue containing 0.7% copper and 36.2% iron.

(3.) A lead-zinc slime containing 18.6% lead and 32.2% zinc was digested for thirty minutes in warm water containing in solution 1% of sodium 'bichromate. The solution was decanted and the material subjected to the froth flotation separation using water only to which was added eucalyptus oil in the proportion of 1 lb. per ton of slime treated producing a flotation product containing 47.2% zinc and 6.3% lead, leaving a residue containing 31.6% lead and 16.3% zinc.

In most instances the action is facilitated by heating the solutions, and we have found temperatures of from 120 F. to 150 F. to be in most cases suitable.

We do not confine ourselves to the proportions above given: the best proportion in each case can be determined by trial.

Having now fully described and ascerire tained our said invention and the manner in which itis to be performed we declare that what we claim is v 1. A process of concentrating 'metalliferv ous ores, which consists in subjecting the ore 'ous ores, which .consists in subjecting the ore to the action of a chromium salt and to agitation with a frothingagent to produce a froth relatively high in certain values of the ore.

3. A process of concentrating Inetallifer ous ores,,which consists in subjecting the ore to digestion in a solution of a chromium salt, and then to flotation separation, whereby products are obtained relatively high in certain values and other products are obtained relatively high in other values.

4. A process of concentrating metalliferous ores, which consists in subjecting the ore to digestion in a solution of a chromium salt, and then to a itation with a frothing agent to produce a roth relatively high in certain values of the ore..

5. A process of concentrating ores, which consists in subjecting an ore containing zinc and lead sulfids to'the action of a chromium salt and to a flotation separation, whereby there is produced a flotation product relatively high in zinc and low in lead and a 6. A process of concentrating ores, which consists in subjecting an ore containing zinc and lead sulfids to the action of a chromium salt and to agitation'with a frothing agent to produce a froth relatively high in zinc and low in lead leaving a residue relatively high in lead and low in zinc.

7. A process of concentrating ores, which consists in subjecting an ore containing zinc a salt'of chromium, and then to flotation separation, whereby a float concentrate is obtained relatively high in zinc and low in lead and a residue is obtained relatively low in zinc and high in lead.

8.,A process of concentrating ores, which consists in subjecting an ore ccntaining'zinc and lead sulfids'to digestion in a solution m a salt of chromium, and then to agitation with a frothing agent to produce a froth relatively high in zinc and low in lead, leaving a residue relatively low in zinc and high in lead. v

In testimony whereof we, the said HENRY HOWARD GREENWAY and ALFRED HENRY PIPER LoWRY, have signed our names to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

HENRY HOWARD GREENWAY.

u ALFRED HENRY PIPER LOWRY.

WVitnesses CHARLES NICHOLAS COLLISON, Daisy \VrLLIAMs. 1

and lead sulfids to digestion in a solution of resi'due'relatively high in-leadand' low in I

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2664199 *Aug 27, 1952Dec 29, 1953Phelps Dodge CorpFlotation recovery of molybdenite
US3921810 *Sep 27, 1973Nov 25, 1975Pima Mining CoTalc-molybdenite separation
US4231859 *Nov 27, 1979Nov 4, 1980The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The InteriorSteam injection in the presence of activated carbon an sulfide reagents
Classifications
U.S. Classification209/167, 252/61, 209/901
Cooperative ClassificationY10S209/901, B03D1/06