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Publication numberUS1103202 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 14, 1914
Filing dateNov 19, 1913
Priority dateNov 19, 1913
Publication numberUS 1103202 A, US 1103202A, US-A-1103202, US1103202 A, US1103202A
InventorsFrank O Hoagland
Original AssigneeUnion Metallic Cartridge Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cartridge-shell.
US 1103202 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. O. HOAGLAND.

CARTRIDGE SHELL. AFPLIGATION TILED NOV. 19, 1913.

1-, 1 08,202. Patented July 14, 1914.;

j ZITNEISSES: I xglml? 'ATTORNEY UNITED sTATEs PATENT o IoE.

FRANK 0. HOAGLAND, or BEIDGEPCET, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR To THE UNIO METALLIC CARTRIDGE COMPANY, or BRIDGEPORT, CoNNECTIoUT, A COEPCE TION OF CONNECTICUT.

CABTBID Gil-SHELL.

Specification of Letters Patent. Patnted July 14, 1914,

Application filed November 19, 1913. Serial No. 801,834.

T 0 all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRANK O. I-IoAGLANn, a citizen of the United States, residing at Bridgeport, county of Fairfield, State of Connecticut, have invented an Improvement in Cartridge-Shells, of which the following is a specification.

This invention has for its object to produce a rim fire cartridge shell so constructed as to provide an efficient gas check, without elongation of the shell and without expansion of the mouth of the shell.

It is of course well understood that all properly constructed cartridge shells are adapted to be expanded in the chamber of the gun, by the pressure generated at the instant of the explosion, sufiiciently to prevent the gases of the explosion from escaping rearwardly. Heretofore, so far as I am aware, this gas check has been produced by expansion of the mouth of the shell against the chamber of the gun. It is furthermore well understood that unless guns are properly cared for, and sometimes in spite of care, erosion of the wall of the chamber takes place near the mouth of the shell where the gases of the explosion escape into the chamber. This is especially likely to take place in shooting galleries where the guns are not always well cared for and results in the mouths of the shells being expanded into the eroded portion of the chamber and locked there so that they can only be extracted with great difficulty. Furthermore, the gas check is not effective owing to irregularities in the wall of the chamber so that in some cases the hot gases of the explosion will blow back into the face of the shooter.

These objections I wholly overcome and produce shells which provide an effective check against the rearward escape of gases, prevent the shell from sticking in the chamher (the chambers being always slightly tapered) and furthermore eliminate the danger of the shells cracking, by stretching the metal of the shell, this for the reason that there is very much less resistance to the expansion or smoothing out of the stretched portion of the shell than there is to the expansion of the unstretched metal at the mouth of the shell, and as the smoothed out.

portion of the shell is forced into contact with the wall of the chamber back of the place where erosion ordinarily takes place the gas check is sure to be efficient. 7

With the above stated and other objects in view I have devised the novel stretched shell which I will now describe, referring to the accompanying drawing forming a part of this specification and using reference characters to indicate the several parts:

Figure 1 is a view partly in elevation and partly in section showing the rear end of a rifle barrel with a cartridge therein, and the receiver; Fig. 2 a similar view after the explosion showing the stretched portion of the shell expanded against the wall of the chamber back of an erosion in the wall of the chamber; Fig. 3 an elevation of my novel cartridge shell, and Fig. 4 is a section on the line H in Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows.

1O denotes a rifle barrel, 11 the bore, 12 the chamber, 18 the receiver and 14 my novel cartridge shell.

The essential feature of the invention is the stretching of the metal of the shell contiguous to the head, the effect of which is, when the shell is exploded, to cause the stretched portion of the shell to be expanded or smoothed out and forced into contact with the wall of the chamber. 15 indicates where an erosion of the chamber has taken place through the escape of gases at the mouths of shells. This erosion is greatest contiguous to the mouth of the shell and extends backward and forward from the location of the mouth of the shell but does not ordinarily extend backward more than a third of the length of the shell, leaving the rear portion of the wall of the' chamber in good condition, so that the engagement therewith of the portion of the shell contiguous to the head will provide an efficient gas check, and obviate all danger from the rearward escape of gases. The stretching operation also obviates danger of the shells cracking. This stretching 'of the wall of the shell may be effected in any suitable manner as by forming grooves or corrugations therein as indicated by 16.

The operation of my novel shell when firing takes place will be readily understood from Fig. 2. The stretched or expanded portion of the shell .near its head yields much more readily than does the unstretched mouth of the shell. The result is that the i mouth of the shell is not expanded all but :Go'ple: of this patent may be obtained for pressions therein, whereby the resistance of the shell to radial expansion is made less at the stretched portion than at the mouth of 15 the shell, the stretched portion remaining permanently expanded to provide a gas vcheck.

-In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two Witnesses.

FRANK O. HOAGLAND.

Witnesses:

W. M. THOMAS, EDWARD H. ALLEN.

five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3059367 *Feb 23, 1961Oct 23, 1962Rosebush Jr Judson GCompensating means in barrel chamber for low and high powered cartridges
US4986186 *Nov 1, 1988Jan 22, 1991General Dynamics Corporation Air Defense Systems Division, Pomona FacilityHigh peak pressure notched cartridge case
US5297491 *Sep 21, 1992Mar 29, 1994Rheinmetall GmbhCasing bottom for a propelling charge casing
DE4131286A1 *Sep 20, 1991Apr 1, 1993Rheinmetall GmbhHuelsenboden fuer eine treibladungshuelse
Classifications
U.S. Classification102/464, 42/76.2
Cooperative ClassificationF42B5/26