Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1104073 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 21, 1914
Filing dateJun 21, 1911
Priority dateJun 21, 1911
Publication numberUS 1104073 A, US 1104073A, US-A-1104073, US1104073 A, US1104073A
InventorsGreenleaf Whittier Pickard
Original AssigneeWireless Specialty Apparatus Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Detector for wireless telegraphy and telephony.
US 1104073 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. W. PIOKARD. DETECTOR FOR WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHDNY. APPLICATION FILED JUNE 21, 1911.

1,104,073, Patented July 21, 19M

I a li i 5 In V611 tor:

Atty or eccentric to (as in Figs. 1 and 2) the axis contact member itself spring contact, inasmuch as the inertia of recti or formed with a loop between its ends asj shown, and has its contact end offset from of its operating rod 17 in order to permit selection of contact at any point of the surface of X. Freedom of movement is pr0- vided for rod 17 bythe following construction. Rod 17 is free to slide throu h and rotate in metal'block 18, and may e held rigidly therein by screw 19 having hard rubber insulating head 20. Block 18 has a downwardly depending centrally disposed in 21, which, asa pivot, engages in a hole in lower metal block 22 which is screwed to hard rubber insulating base 23 by screw 2s. A set screw 27 (Fig. 3) is provided to engage pin 21 and thereb fix upper block 18 rigidly in any desired positlon. Thus rod 17 can swing about pin 21 as a pivot, and can rotate and reciprocate in block 18, and the eccentric contact endof wire B can enga e apgy oint of. the surface of X. j The df silicon, iron pyrite, Pyronor Perikon, etc} is embedded in a mass of readily fusib e metal as shown, which in turn is held by a screw 30 in a metal 'cup' 0 (as in my Patent 933,263 granted Se 'tember- 7, 1909), which cup is rigidly carried with a rod 25 which can rotate and mi rocate' in a metal block 26 screwed to the ard rubber base by screw 28; the rod25 beingheldin block 26 byscrew 29.

i The simplicity of construction in this ixi- 'solid' possessing the propert tion, of consists of a metallic terminal of low inertia constructed with flexibility and freedom f vention having the looped spring-contact member B, is due to the fact that the placing of the gradual spring'adjustment in the permits dispensing with a spring or springs at any other part of the device. To ad ust this detector of Figs. 3 and 4 the hard rubber head 20 and the'milled head 27 (Fig. 3), are slightly loosened so that the block 18 can be swung,

and also adjust the pressure on such point. When the best contact point is found, both 20 and 27 are clamped up tight.

I attribute the great mechanical stability of the device of this invention lar ely to the feature of the looped or humps fine-wire the end of the spring is very small relative to the frictional resistance of the terminal .movement in all lateral directions when in contact with said rectifying member, whereby the body of the contact member may be on the rectifying material, the result being that any motion which may be imparted to the spring by shocks or jars does not move the contact terminal,- but moves only the other parts of the spring which may move slightly without affecting the contact. The importance of mechanical stability in this art, particularly under the operating conditions of the apparatus in army and navy use, including gun-fire on shipboard, are so well known asnot to require explanation.

The electrical stability of the device is largely due to the hard and non-oxidizing properties of the materials specified. "By non-oxidizable is meant substantially so. Of all those used by me, the platinum-gold alloy is so far supreme as to stand out prominently as probably the best possible material.

The contact-member of this invention, in

the form of a wire, permits contact-selection irres ective of adjusting movements of the rect-i ying material X (thus diifering from construction of the present invention, while the advantages of the wire exposed surface of the rectifier X, and then to adjust to exactly the desired pressure,

without any movement of the 'rectifienX whatsoever.

I claim: j 1. A contact member fora detector ,re-ctis her, which consists of a wire of-electricellyconducting material formed with a. loop, in 'jcombination. with a which oneend of the wire is secured, the

rotatable support-J9 free end of the wire being offset-from the center of the support.

2. The combination with a conducting a contact member t erefor which 1 moved by shocks or jars without shifting its V I contact point on the rectifying member. and the rod 17 pushed in or out of block 18,

s so as to both select the contact point on X 4 3. A contact member for a detector rectifier, which'consists of an alloy of platinum. and gold.

4:. The combination with a conducting solid possessing the property of rectification, of a contact member therefor, which consists of a sprin y wireof electrically conducting material formed with a loop.

5. A contact member for a detector rectifier, which consists of a platinized gold wire formed with a loop.

6. In a rectifier detector, the combination with the, rectifying member, of a contact therefor consisting of an electrically conducting wire spring having a contact terminal of hard good-conducting material.

7-. The combination with a conducting solid possessing the property of rectification, of a contact member therefor, which consists of a wire having low inertia near the contact point, and constructed at its other portion to yield to shocks or jars without moving the contact point.

to put the point or of rectifica- 8. The combination with a conducting solid possessing the property of. rectification, of a contact member therefor, which consists ,of a wire of electrically conducting material formed with a loop, in combination with an adjustable support to which one and of the wire is attached.

9. A contact for. therecti ing member of a detector, which consists 0 an electrically conductin wire spring, a support to which one end 0 the wire is attached, the free end of the wire being ofisetrelative to the sup-' port, and the said free end of the wire having a contact-terminal consisting of hard good-conducting materiah v I 10. A contact for the rectifying member of a detector, which consists of aspringy wire of conducting material having a contact-terminal of hard good-conducting material, in combination with a conducting solid possessing-the PIOPBl'tY of rectification, with which the contact terminals of said contact engages. I

11. A contact for the rectifying member of a detector, which consists of a springy wire of conducting material having a contact-terminal of platinized gold.

12. A contact for the rectifying member of a detector, which consists of an: electrically conducting wire looped or coiled into a spring, and having a contact-terminal of noble metal.

- 13. A contact for the rectifyin member of a detector, which consists of an e ectrically conducting wire looped or coiled into a spring and having a contact-terminal of platinized gold.

GREENLEAF WHITTIER PIGKARI).

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3254279 *Apr 17, 1963May 31, 1966Cohn JamesComposite alloy electric contact element
US3355638 *Aug 24, 1964Nov 28, 1967Siemens AgPoint-contact diode with au-pt point
Classifications
U.S. Classification257/41, 420/466, 420/510, 252/62.30R
Cooperative ClassificationH01L29/00