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Publication numberUS1105016 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1914
Filing dateJul 29, 1911
Priority dateJul 29, 1911
Publication numberUS 1105016 A, US 1105016A, US-A-1105016, US1105016 A, US1105016A
InventorsWilliam K Bassford
Original AssigneeUniversal Oil Converter Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Explosive-engine.
US 1105016 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. K. BASSFORD.

BXPLOSIVE ENGINE.

APPLIOATION FILED JULY29. 191 1.

Patented Jl11y28, 1914.

TTURNEY Patllted July 28, A1914.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

WITNESS 8 ATT RNEY W. K. BASSFORD. EXPLOSIVE ENGINE.

v APPLIOATION FILED JULY29, 1911. 1,105,016. Patented July 2s, 19m

4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

W.K. BAssPoRD..

AEXPLOSIVE ENGINE.

APPLIUAT'ION FILED JULY 29, 1911.

u Patented July 28,1914 b 's I 4 SHEETS-snm 4.

MCO

INI/Ewan Br i UNITED STATES PATENT oEEIoE4 WILLIAM x. BASSE-OED, OE PERTH aMBoY, JERSEY, .essIGNOR To uNIvEEsAL OIL CONVERTER COMPANY, OE LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK, A COIEBOEATION or NEWYOEK.

- -ExPLosIvE- ENGINE 1,105,016. l speciaeation of Letters raten. .A Patented Jury 23, 1914.

Applicatil filed July 29, 1911. Serial No. 641,187.

To all 'z o'hme't ma concern.' f

Be it known t at I, WILLIAM K. Bessrom), a citizen of the United States,- and a resident of Perth Amboy, county of Middlesex, State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Explosive-Engines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to improvements in explosive engines of-that class wherein hydrocarbon fuel, such as gasolene, kerosene,

ualities as asolen'e and kerosene for example, are employed.

It is apparent that a system which permits the 'use of a heavier fuel than is now commonly employed in motor vehicles will reduce the cost of operating these vehicles, the heavier fuel being less expensive than the lighter fuel. In order that such heavier fuel may be practically and .economically y' employed, it should be heated 'and provision should be made 'for the use of the lighter so fuel when the engine is cold or is notas hot as it should be inorder to secure satisfactory results from the'particular heavier fuel employed. The system therefore contemplates an organization of parts vwhereby the engine may. be started on the lighter` of these fuels andthen .when working properly on this cfue'l, automatically shifting-certain elements to. change to the ot er fuel. AThe sys- 'teln includes 'a means by which the fuel is heated inthe passage of Vthe fuel from the 'fuel' container to the engine, and also, in-

cludes means for carbureting -the'fue-l prior to 'its admission to theengin'e. The heating means 1s ,connected with an appropriate part ofthe engine, preferably the exhaust pipe' ofy thelatter, and themeans throughwhieh'tlie heating medium. flows is controllable vsoas to vary the 'heating effect receivedl by the fuel in its passage through` the heater. Thus,

it' ,is apparent that starting with 'a flifglht'j;

- fluid, such as cold asolene, or gasoleneja.

i heated condition, t e last named being pre-f' gferred, the advantage of a light fuel for-.fa

tare' mot\desirably composed starting purposes is obtained. When the err-1l gine is started and working well the supply-5 of the lighter fuel is cut off and the supply o f the heavier fuel is opened and at the same time a means is operated which causes the flow of the heating medium through the heater to be retarded, so that the heavier fuel is under the effect of said heating medium .for a greater length of time and hence receivesa greater heating effect utherefrom, it being apparent that the heavier fuel now being supplied to run the engine, requires for its best results more heat than did the lighterV fuel. Shouldthe temperature of the fuel be]- come too high, means are provided where by the course of the heating .medium is changed, said medium being caused to flow?` directly through the heater instead ofi through the circuitous course just referredl` to. Again, if Va condition arises wherein the temperature of this fuel becomes too loW, prior to its admission to the engine, means are again'operated to cause the heating medium to iiow directly throughthe heater and at the same time to change from the heavier fuel to the lighter fuel until a temperature has been reached which makes it again advisable to use the heavierv fuel,y when the change to the latter and the retarding of the heating fluid is again effected. By this y tively high and poor` gra esv may beemployed, and it is not the intention herein .to

restrict 'the invention to any particular fuels, further than that they be of different specific gravities t The means-"by which ythe courses of the heating fluid within the vheater are con- 'trolled,1 and the means by which the ow -ofthe lighter and; heavier liquid fuels are icontrolled, comprise valves which are preferably automatically operated byl variations in temperature of a heater iuid. In

all fof the present exempliiications, this fluid yd'e'arives its yheat primarily from the engme.

Preferably, the heat of the fuel mixture is utilized control the operation of the dtle means by which these valvesv -op'erated by" variations in temperapreferably of an electrical nature,

i of` a temperature actuated switch suitably connected with a motor for actuating the valve which controls the course of the heating fluid in the heater and with a magnet having connection with the valves of .the

fuel-supply means so as simultaneously to open one and close the' other.

In the accompanying drawings, Il have".

shown several specificially different embodiments of the present invention, but it is to be understood that while these different embodiments are very satisfactory andare conjy sidered to be the best embodiments oftheinvention, yet the invention is not restricted thereto and its details may be variously changed without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the subjoined claims.

In the drawings, wherein like characters of reference denote corresponding parts in the several views :-Figure l is a view, somewhat diagrammatic of one desirable em bodiment of the present invention, showing certain of the parts in section and others in elevation. Fig. 2 is a detail sectional view, on a larger scale than Fig. 1, showing the fuel container and its valves. ,Fig 3 isa horizontal section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2. Fig. 4 is a `diagrammatic view of the preferred means for operating the valves which control the flow of the heating medium and of the fluids used as fuel. Fig. 5 is a view, partly in elevation and partly in section of a specifically different embodiment of ,the invention. Fig. 6 is a like view of another slightly changed embodiment of the invention.

In all the g'ures of the drawings, the part marked A represents an internal combustion engine of any suitable kind: B the fuel supply pipe thereof: land C a means by which the fuel is heated prior to its admission to the engine. The heating means 4is of the construction shown in ,my oo-pending application, Serial No. 623,898,1fl`ed April 28, 1911,'comprising a closed vesselv containing a coil 21 and an exhaust pipe 22. Said exhaust' pipe preferably discharges into the atmosphere and is vprovided within the heater with a valve 23 and perforations 24. It extends through one end of the heater and through the coils 21 nearly to 'the other end vof the heater and its latter end is arranged in juxtaposition to and in line with the outlet end ofapipe 25, which -ppe extendsfrom the exhaust of` the engine vA. VIt will-.be noted that thel outlet end of the: pipe 25. and the inlet end of lthe pipe 22 are separated from each otherby anppen space, marked 26 and that the valve 231s arranged at a distance from the inlet end of the pipe 22 while the perforations 24 are between the yvalve andthe outlet end of said pipe. 'It will thereforeA be apparent 'l that when the"valve23isturned toj close the vwith a source of supply of -light `gasolene, and' has, as usual, a valve, indi- 'cated at 5 1 for controlling the inlet of air pipe 22 the exhaust products entering-.the

heater by way of the pipe 25. will be caused to ,ow around' thecoil 21 and will .enter the pipe 22 by way of the p'erforations 24, whereas when the valve 23 is open the exhaust products, or `a -considerable part' haust products around the pipe 22. This battling means is preferably formed of a series of spirally arranged erforated dia.- phragms 29 arranged so t at their convolu-tions alternatewith the convolutions of the coil 21. Said baffling means may be continuous or made in sections, as preferred.

Referring now to the particular embodiment of the invention illustrated byl Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4, D designates a suitable c ntainer having compartments l30 and 31- or fuel of different specific gravities, as gasolene, and kerosene, for example.' These compartments provide separate'sources of supply y for said fuels and in this particular form are shown as being conoentrically arranged. The container also has,a which is connected by a .pipe` 33 with the inlet end of the coil 21. Within t-hepipe 32 there isa nozzle 34 which is common to 37, the inlet to the branch 35 being in compartment 30, while the inlet to the branch 36 is in the compartment 31. These inlets 37 are controlled by valves 3 8 and 39, hav

-ing stems 40 and 41 respectively slidably pipe or tube 32 ,two branches 35 and 36, each having an inlet mounted in guides 42 and 43, and also hav Y ing springs 44 and 45 for movin themvin one direction. They are moved temately, in opposition to their respective springs, by( a rocker arm 46 which is automatically 'op erated'as will be hereinaftermere particularlyset. forth. The branches 35 and 36are provided with adjustably mounted needle valves 47 by which the quantit7 .of "liquid flowingtherethrough is regulate The discharge end of the coil 21-is oonnec'ted by a pipe 48 with one end of the.

fuel-inlet pipe B and between the pipes 48 `andB there is a connecting section 49 `which is provided wit-ha carbureter or vaporizer E and with ,a valve Ffor admitting an' auxilia supply 'of air to this section 49. The'car ureter F is connected by a plipe 50 el, as

thereto.

to pass around the pipe'l 22 iny the heater.

' thereafter How through the motor fields -i'n a of the exhaust gases, the gasolene valve is ple, and these changes and othersnot neces-v saryherein to set forth, are contemplated to Fig.` 5, the separate sources of supply fof ployed with a separately supplied c arbureter -for the other iuid.vr The -containerof this porizer. or carbureterl E10 has a valve 38a .cation of my invention, each movement of 'i preceded bv a circuit changing the position xceded by a\ circuit which energizes one of the and the other turned on.I The operations of kerosene valve 39 at the same time the valve 23 is closed to cause the exhaust gases It will thus be seen that, in this exemplifithe motor must be in a relatively opposite direction to, that of the preceding"movement, due to which each motor-actuating circuit is of the switch -blades so that the currentv will proper direction. Irr'other words, each circuit completed through the motor is lpretwo electro-magnets and arranges the elements of the motor circuit so that current flows therethrough Vto rotate the motor in a proper direction. `Further, the connections between the magnet controlled switch and the valves controlling the supply are such that upon each rocking'movement of the switch, one of the fuel valves is out off the lfuel valves are in such relationto the movements of themotor, that `when the heater valve is open to 'permit free passage be, within the spirit of the, invention` considered in itsilbroadest as ect.. i

In the -V'form of the invention shown in the lighter and heavier fuels are embodied inseparate tanks o'r containers, one of which, is eonnected'by apipe 100 with a carbureter orvaporizer. In other words, instead of employing a cntainer having two'compartments, one for each fuel fluid, a container with 'one' compartment onlymay be em-l fornil of the invention is marked D10 and the carbureter is marked E0.' The formerl has only one valved pipe (marked 38a). and is used for the heavierfuel, as kerosene for example. The valve of this pipe is marked SQBaI-idyits stem .is marked 141". -Thf'vawhose stem is marked 40". The switch 11 which may be identical with that employed which has the air inlet valve F10.

in the other form .has its arm 56a connected vby a'- link 57a with the arms 58a and 58b i of rocking levers whose other arms 46a and 46" are connected to the stems 41a 'and 40a respectively.' A valve, marked 47a controls the quantity of the lighter fuel supplied, the latter owingfrom the chamber 30a of the carburetor into the mixing chamber 49, It will ,be apparent that this system will operate precisely as 4does the other, except that the carbureter E and the valved gasolene tank of the latter are dispensed with and their place taken lby a vaporizer having a gasolene lchamber whose inlet is controlled by a valve lin the same. manner asis the valve of the gasolene compartment of the first construction. a

In Fig.. 6 a further modification is shown. In this there are three separate chambers marked 30b 3P and .30 respectively. The 4chambers 30b and 30c are for the lighter fuel, as gasolene, and the chamber 3lb is for the heavier fuel, as kerosene. The chamber 30c isin a part of the carbureter, the latter being like that shown in Fig. 5.' The chambers 30b and 31b are shown as separate tanks connected'with the coil of the heater bya pipe 38a having branches 33b and 33c leading to the tanks respectively. Each tank has ya-pipe s aid pipes being marked 35a and 36. They are provided with inlet valves 38 and y39c having stems y40c and 41c connected by'a rocker 46c whosel arm 58c is connected by'a link 57c with the switch precisely as in the first constructicm. This link however, in

Fig. 6, also extends to the rocking lever,-

l.marked 58b of the valve 38b controlling'` the inlet to the chamber 30d of the carburetor. -The valves 38c and 88b are so set that there is one-.half a supply of the lighter duid from the chamber 30 and the other half from the chamber the latter being preheated and "mixed with the xva or from chamber 80c and' with air, Qin the c amber49, said 'chamber 49 -having the air inlet'valve F10. It will. be noted that the two valves 38 and 38b opera-te to open and close together and alternately with respect to the valve 39. The operati n otherwise will be understood.

Having wnowD described the invention what I ,believe to be new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is: f

l. In coinb'ination with a gas engine,ineans for Supplyingthe same with explosive gas-fl i eous A materials respectively derived fr .liquid fuels of diiferent qualities, com rising separate sources of supply of said uels,\

valvular means for controlling said sources of supply, means. .for conducting a iiuid heatingI medium from. the engine andthe fluid fuel from one of said sources of lsupply in such relation to eachother that the fuel will be heatedv by said mediuminfits paSSage'to the engine, said fneans providing-V different courses of travel for one of said 45 connection with the valves of the heater and tion between said'valve 'and the valvular means of the fuels-supply.l

' 9. In combination with a gasfengine, a

heater communicating with the exhaust thereof, means'for supplyingthe engine with fuels derived from liquids of different qualities, said means including a conduit com-,

municatin with the engine, said conduit being of suc v relation to the heater that the fuel will be heated in its passage to the engine, a container for the respective fuels connected to the conduit in advance of the heater, another'means for supplying the engine with fuel derived from a liquid ,and communicating withj the conduite between the heater and the engine and a valve-controlled air inlet communicating with the fuel conduit between the heater and the engine.

8. In combination with a gas engine, means whereby the same is supplied with explosive gaseous materials respectively derived from liquids of diderent specific qualities,

comprising a heater having .valve-controlled means forming courses of travel -for a heating medium therethrough and also having means whereby' a hydrocarbon' fuel may flow through the heater, valved sources of supply of fluids of different specific qualities-and means' controlled by heat derivedk from the engine for 'automatically controllingthel valves of the heater and fuel supplies.

4:. In combination with a gas engine, val-ved means through which the sameis supplied with explosive" gaseous materials respectively derived from liquids of differ-. ent specific gravities, a heater in .the path of travel'of one of the gaseous materials, said heater having valve-,controlled passagesfora heating medium, a thermostat and means controlled by the latter and havinghydrocarbon-supply means for operating said valves automatically. l

'5. In combination with a as engine, separate chambers for fuels'of l(iferent specific `gravities, a heater having. means through which said fuels pass, means for vaporizing the fuels, separate valves for controlling the i flow of the fuels, the heater also having means forming a plurality of courses of travel therein for a heating medium, a valve for controlling the courses of travel of the heating medium, and a means controlled by heat derived from the `engine for automatically operating the valves of the luid sup-- ply and the valve of the heater.

6. In combination with a gas engine, separate chambers for fuel of different specific qualities, valves forcontrolling the supply of saidfuels, a heater having valve-controlled passages for a heating medium and also having means forming a ssage for "one of the fuels, -a thermostatic element arranged to be operated by heat derived from the engine and means between the thermostatic element and the valves of the lfuels supply and *theater for operating the same 'under control of the former.

connected with each other to move simulwith the valves l of the fuelpsupply and heater for operating said valves under control of the thermostatic element. n

8. In combination with a gas engine, separate chambers foi: fuels of different specific qualities, valves for controlling the supptly of said fuels, rocking arins respectively c onnected to said valves, said arms havin connection with each other and beinga apted to open and close the valves alternately, a therinostatic clement arranged to be operated by heat derived from the engine and meansbetwen the thermostatic element and said' arms for operating the latter.

9. In combination with a gas engine,s`e arate chambers for fuels of different spec' e qualities, valves for controlling the supply Y of said fuels', rocking arms respeirt'ivelyconnected to said valves, said arms havin con: 1.05 nection with each other and being a apted to open and close the valves alternately, a

'heater having valve-controlled passages for a heating medium and also having means forming a .passage for one of the fuels, a 110 thermostaticelement arranged to be -operated by heat' derived from the engine and( means.arrangedn to beoperated by the thermostatic `element to operate the valve of the heater'and said arms.

10. In combination with a gas. engine, separate chambers Vfor fuelsof different specie qualities,'valves for controlling the supplyof said fuels, rocking arms connecting with each other -and being adapted to open 120 and close -thev valves alternately, a heater having valve-controlled passages for asbesting medium and also havin means forming a. passage for both of the uids, a' thermo-y static element arranged to be operated by 121i` heat derived `from the engine and means connecting the therniostatic element with ing," from the engine, a hea-ting chamber connectedto'the-exhaust pipe,an exhaust outlet pipe from said chamber, extending into"the latter, -a valve in said pipe, the latterl pi e having-inlets .at opposite sides of the va ve, nea'ns forming an indirect passeparate chambers for fuels of different.

sage foi; exhaust gases around the exhaust pipe, means through which yone of the fuels pass through said heater, a thermostatic elefrom the engine, and means whereby the lthermostatic element.

supply ofsaidfuels, an exhaust pi e i merit.' arranged to be operated by heat derived'fromthe engine, and means whereby theI valves' ofthe fuel supply means and the heater `are operated under "control of the `12,'In combination with a gas engine,

specificv qualities, valves for controlling tle ea ing from the engine, a heating cham er connested-.to the exhaust pipe, an exhaust Outlet pipe from said chamber, extending into the latter, a' valve in said pipe, the latter pipe having inlets atiopposite Sides of the valve', means forming an indirect passage for' exhaust gases aoundthe exhaust pipe, means'4 through which both of the fuels pass through said heater, a thermostatic element `arranged to be operated by heat derived valves ofthe .fuel supply means and the heater `-are operate'd under control of thev thermostatic element.

13. In Acombination* with a 4gas engine, means for the sup ly of fuels of different f specific qualities t ereto vadapted to shift meansfforx'ning direct and indirect passagesr Liv fr'oinone fuel to the other, saidlmeans having' a controlling element by variations in the temperature of the fuel beingsupplied for causing the shifting from onefueltothe other to be automatically accomplished.

14=."In combination with a gas engine,

valved means for the supply of fuels of different specic qualities,` thereto, la heater' thoughwhich one of the fuels flows inits passagetothe engine, said heater having for :the flow-ofthe heating Huid thereto withiavalve for controllng'such flow, an actuating element operated by heat derived from theengine and means whereby the latteregautomatically operates the valves of the heater. zand. supply means, to change the course travel of the heating medium and to che Y theasupplysof. fuel. from the lighter tol thegavier; or from the heavier to ithe lighter;V v

.i 15; In'lf-foibination with a ltheiz-,p'assage to the engine, said heater-havhich isA operated v Sages for the flow of the heating medium thereto' with a valve for controlling 'such flow, an actuating element operated by heat derived from the engine and means whereby the actuating element automatically operates the valves of the heater and supply means, to change the course`of travel of the heating medium inthe heater and to change the supply of fuel'from the lighter tothe heavier or from the latter to the lighter.

16. In combination with a gas engine, V'alvedmeans for the supply of fuels of different qualities to theengine, and electrically operated means for shifting the valves. of the fuel supply means to change from 80 one f uel to the other, comprising a movable element having connection with said valves and means forming separate circuits for operating said element, the circuit forming means having an 4element whereby one of 85 said circuits may be completed and the other broken under cont-rol Aof heat derived p from the engine.` V 17. In combination with a as engine, valved means for supplying exp osive fuels of different specific qualities, a heater, connections between said fuel supplying means and the engine, certain of which connections extend through said heater, an exhaust pipe leading from the engine to the heater, a valve iii the heater, electrical connections for alternately opening and closin said heater valve and alternately establishing communication between said supplymeans and the engine in fixed relation to the move- 10,

ments of the heater valve and means controlled by heat derived from the engine for completing said connections.

18. -In combination with ua gas engine, valved means for supplying fuels ,of dilfer- 10g ent specific qualities, aheater', an exhaust pipe leading from the engine top-the heater, valve controlled means Vto regulate the teln-A perature within said heater, aiielectrical ele` ment for opening and closing the heater. 131'( valve, means forming circuits through said element, a member movable to complete saidcircuits and cause alternately opposite'movement of said-element, said member having `connection with the fuel supply means'-1'1-f whereby to alternately establish communll cation between the sameand the engine,^and

'means toautomatically vactuatesaid movable member including electrical circuits Fand-ja switchcontrolled by heatderived from the 12`c en inefor closing the samelgy; 11 9.-"Ihe1 combination of lfa. as engine, a

fvalv'edffheater,va1ved means or Isupplying' p explosivefuels of dllferentfspeeic qualities, as engine,-l

having i:oniie'itionu with the '-engi'iieA through 125 said heater,'a motorhavingV connection Awith' the `heater; yalvettcf open andfclose'fthe same,

switch having armatures upon opposite sides of its pivot and having connections ,with the supply means to alternatelyestablish communication between the same. and the engine, electro-magnets adj acent-the said. armatures, and a thermostatic switch incircuit with said electro-magnets,

20. In combination with a gas engine, means for supplying the same with explosive gaseous materials respectively derived from liquid fuels of different qualities, comprising separate sources of supply of said fuels, valvular means for controlling said sourcesy of supply, a conduit connected to the inlet port of the engine and common to said fuels, means for conducting a fluid heating medium from the engine and the fluid fuel from one of said sources of sup ly in such relation to each other `that the fJuel will be heated by said medium in its passage to the conduit, said means providing different courses of travel for one of said fluids, whereby the heat imparted to the fuel is.

variable. by changing the relative courses of travel of the fuelv and heating medium, a valve for cbntrollin said relative cour-'ses of travel, an operatlve connection between said valve and the valvularmeans of the fuels-supply, and means operatively related. to said conduit and adapted-to be operated under control of the temperature of the fuelmixture flowing through the'latter, for operating said valves, said 'means having connection with one ofthe valves.

2l. In combinatlon with a gas engine,

I valved means for supplying fuels of different specific qualities, a heater, an exhaust pipe leading from the engine to the heater, connections between said vfuel supplying means and the engine, certain of which connections extend through said heater, and means to control the temperature of said heater and the communication between said fuel supplying means-and the engine, by the' temperature of the supply fuel.

22. In combination with a gas engine,

i valved means for supplying fuels of different specific qualities, aheater, an exhaust pipe 'leading from the engine to the heater, connections between said fuel supplying means and the engine, certain of which connections extend through said heater, electrical connections to control. theitemperature of said heater and the communicationbetween said fuel supplying means and thve engine, and thermostat; means in the-fuel supply, to complete said connections.

23. In combination with a gas engine, a heater, an exhaust pipe leading from the lengine to the heater, means to regulate the temperature within said heater, said means having, a valve, an electrical element having connection with the valve of said means to open and close the same, means forming separate circuits through said element lwhereby to move the same in reverse directions, a second electrical element movable to makecontact between terminals of said circuits and to `alternately open and close the same, and means to automatically actu- -ate saidsecond element including electrical circuits and a switch controlled by heat de rived from the engine for closing the circuits.

24. In a fuel supply system for internal combustion engines, valve-controlled chambers for fuels of different specic qualities, 4

a heater through which the fuels flow in their passage from said chambers, said heater having means providing a pluralit-y of courses of travel for a heating fluid therethrough, means through which it has communication with the exhaust of the engine for the supply of said heating fiuidand a valve fo controlling the course of travel of the hea ing fluid, means connecting the valves of the heater and fuel chambers with each other, and means for automaticallyI operating said valves underA control o the heated fuel, comprising an elect-ric.motor, contacts, a pivoted arm adapted to engage said contacts, means for operating said arm under control of variations in temperature of the fuel, electrical .connections between the contacts and motor, and means whereby the motor is connected to one'of the valves. i

25. In a fuel supplysystem for internal combustion engines, valve-controlled chambers for fuels of different specific qualities, a heater through whichv the fuels flow in their lpassage from said chambers, said Lvheater having means providing a4 pluralit of eis4 courses of travel f'or a heating fluid t erethrough, means through which it has communication with the exhaust of the engine for the supply of said heating fluid, and a valve for controlling the course of travel of the heating fluid, and means for automatically operatingthe valves of the fuel 'cham-- .bers and heater under control of the-heated fuel.

heater, an exhaust pipe 4leading from the engine to `said heater, a valved source of fuel 26. In combination with a gasengine, a

of fuel supply' for heavy fuel, connections -between said sources of fuel supply extending through the heater, means or alternately opening and closing the valves of\s`aid fuel supplies, and means controlled by heat derived from the fuel being supplied to the engine for actuating said valve operating means.

27. In combination with a gas engine, a' heater, an exhaust pipe leading from the engine to the heater, valved means for supplying fuels of different specific qualities, hav-t.;-

ing connection with the enginethrough the heater, a third valved means forfsupplying Vfuel located in said supply connection betion with said nozzle, independent adjustin 'valves in said last named connection, cut-0 valves alsopin said connections, means to alternately open and close the said' cut-olf valves and means controlled `by heat derivedA from the fuel \being supplied -to theengine to actuate saidwalve operating means.

29. Incombination with an engine, a

,hand at the city, count andeState of' lbieater, a fuel 'supply 'comprising two chamers through said heater, and adapted to contain fluids of different specific qualities, a spx'jay havinggconn'ection with' the engine nozzleextending into the said connection,

each of said Huid chambers having a'connc valve also' in'each of saidv connections,la

rocking switch having connections withfsaid cut ofi' valves to alternately open: and close the' same, electrical elements for controlling movement of said switch, and a thermostatic v switchv in the fuel supply andin circuit with said electrical elements to actuate thesame. In witne whereof I have hereunto set my New York, this 21st day of uly, 1911. n

' Isn-presence of- ISABEL R. RICHARDS, JOHN J ,'RANAGAN.

.-tion .with said nozzle,l an adjustingvalvin each of said last named'connections, a-cutgoif WILLIAM K. BAssroRD,4

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2431322 *May 1, 1944Nov 25, 1947California Research CorpDiesel engine starting fluid
US2793629 *Dec 2, 1955May 28, 1957California Research CorpInternal combustion engine fuel systems
US2890692 *Jul 1, 1957Jun 16, 1959Kiekhaefer CorpFuel injection system
US2940435 *Mar 7, 1957Jun 14, 1960Fred A NemecDual fuel system
US3022425 *Jul 11, 1956Feb 20, 1962Midland Ross CorpDual fuel control systems for engines burning diesel-type fuels
US7735460Aug 22, 2008Jun 15, 2010Leonard BloomMethod and apparatus for operating standard gasoline-driven engines with a readily-available non-volatile fuel, thereby obviating the use of gasoline
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/552, 123/585, 123/575, 123/25.00K, 261/18.3, 123/557
Cooperative ClassificationF02M31/06