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Publication numberUS1106258 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1914
Filing dateNov 1, 1913
Priority dateNov 1, 1913
Publication numberUS 1106258 A, US 1106258A, US-A-1106258, US1106258 A, US1106258A
InventorsJohn M Tucker, James Armstrong Wilding
Original AssigneeJohn M Tucker, James Armstrong Wilding
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carbureter.
US 1106258 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. M. TUCKER & J. A. WILDING.

GARBUBETER. APPLICATION FILED NOV. 1, 191a. 1,106,258. Patented Aug. 4, 1914,

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APPLICATION FILED NOV. 1, 1913.

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J. M. TUGKER & J. A. WILDING.

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OARBUBETBR.

APPLICATION FILED NOV.1,1913.

Patented Aug. 4, 191' 8 y if 7 7 OW Kx PATENT OFFICE.

JOHN M. TUCKER AND AMES ARMSTRONG WILDING, ortounoiv, ENGLAND.

CARIBURETER.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, JOHN Minimal. TUCKER and JAMES ARMSTRONG Wnpme, subjects of the King of Great Britam, re siding at London, England, have invented new and useful Improvementsin or Relating to Carbureters for Internal-Qombust on Engines, of which the following 1s a specification.

This invention relates to carbureters for internal combustion engines, and the object of the said invention is to provide a con-- struetion or carbureter comprising improved means for breaking up or atomizing the jet or jets of liquid fuel as the latter leaves the orifice or orifices through which it is admitted into the vaporizing or mixing chamber. n

The improved carbureter compr 1ses a member having formed therein an orifice or orifices through which the liquid fuel is intro duced into the vaporizing or mixing chamher, in combination with a member provided with a grating, grid, or one or more blades arranged in proximity to the sa d orifices, and means for supporting said members and rotating one or both of them to effect a relative rotation of the grating, grid; blade or blades, in front of and past the said orifice or orifices, the said grating, grid, blade or blades being essentially ar ranged to move edgewise transversely tothe jet or jets emerging from the said orifice or orifices, in order to intermittently cut through and divide the jet or jets of liquid fuel as the latter enters the vaporizing or mixing chamber before it is mixed with the air passing through the carbureter. The rotation of one or both of the said members is preferably effected by a fan which is driven in the known manner by the air current passing through the carbureter, but such movement may be effected by any other suitable means.

The accompanying drawings show how the said invention may be conveniently and advantageously carried into practice.

In these drawings z-Figure 1 shows in central section, a carbureter constructed according to the present invention. Fig. 2 shows a section taken on the line X---X, Fig. '1. Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 1 illustrating a modified arrangement. Fig. 4 a detail view showing in central section a modified arrangement of jet orifice hereinafter referred to. Fig. 5 is a partial cen- Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed November 1, 1913.

Patented Aug. 4, 1914.

Serial No. 798,754.

tral section of a carburetor illustrating a modified constructional form.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, a is a vaporizing or mixing chamber into which air is admitted, through orifices 6 under the control of a valve 0 in the well-known manner. A liquid fuel supply pipe (Z communicates with an annular conduit 6 arranged around the interior of the chamber aand opening into the same through jet orifices f. A fan 1 rotatably supported on a-suitable anti-trio tion bearing is arranged in the part of the chamber a through which the air current passes, and the ends of the vanes of this fan carry blades h which by the movement of the fan are carried past the orifices f to intermittently cut through and divide the jets of liquid fuel asthe atter enters the vaporizing chamber through the several stationary orifices f.

As shown in F ig ii, the fan may be constructed with vanes m rotatably mounted on arms n projecting from a hub 0 carrying the blades h set edgewise transversely to the jets emerging from the orifices f. By turning these vanes about their respective axes the velocity of rotation of the fan in reference to the velocity of the air can be varied so that sufficient atomization may be insured with slow engine speeds or slow air velocitv without necessitating unduly high speeds of the fan when the engine is running at normal speeds or when the air velocity is high. The adjustment of the angle of the vanes in accordance with the required variation in the speed of the fan may be effected by contrifugal or other automatic, controlling means, and to this end the vanes m may be arranged-on a sleeve 7) having a quick threaded screw-nut portion I] engaging a screw threaded portion 1 on the arm 'n. The sleeve is thrust outwardly by a spring 8. At the outer end of the arm n a block 25 with lugs to is secured by a pin a. A weighted lever w pivoted between the lugs a on a pin a: has one end '1) resting against the sleeve 77 at the outer end thereof. \Vhen the speed of the fan increases the weighted end o! the lever to moves outwardly so that the end 9 of the lever thrusts the sleeve 1! inwardly against the thrust of the spring As the sleeve moves longitudinally on the arm n it is rotated by the inter-engaged screw threaded parts (7, 7', thus varying the angle at which the vanes are set with respect to the direction of the current oi." air impinging thereon.

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'As thespeed of the fan decreases the parts are restored to their initial positions by the thrust of the spring 8.

dle'ferring to Fig. 3, the liquid fuel supply pipe (6 18 formed with a rotatable upper portion comprising radially arranged tubular arms through which the liquid fuel passes to orifices f opening into theyapor izing or mixing chamber a. The arms '5 carry vanes j forming a fan by which the c'urrenz'; of air through the chamber a is utilized to IOtlll' the arms Blades 70 are supported staticmarily in proximity to the orifices 1 The horizontal .ngement of the jet orifice as shown in l and 2, is to some degree defective in that when the carbu reter is tilted for example, when the carburetor is employed on an engine mounted on an automobile Vehicle and the latter is ascending or descending a hill, it may happen that the liquid fuel pours through the jet orifice by grayitation independently of suction induced by the movement of the en- 525 gines piston. In the arrangement shown in Fig. 4, the jet orifice; is inclined upwardly from the conduit c to the chamber a. With this arrangement the carbureter can be tilted to a considerable angle without the liquid 30 fuel flowing out by gravitation Ytliat We claim is: 1. In a carlmretcr, a niemberhaving a et orifice formed therein through which fuel is supplied into the air conduit through the carbureter, a blade which when in proximity to the outlet from said orifice is set edgewise transversely to a jet emerging from the said orifice, and means distinguished from the said blade and adapted to cause relative rotational movement between the said orificecl member and the said blade.

2. In a carburetor, a member having a jet orifice formed therein through which fuel is supplied into the air conduit through the carbureter, a blade which when in proximity to the outlet from said orifice is set edgewise transversely to a jet emerging from the said orifice, and a fan adapted to cause relative rotational vmovement between the said orificed member and the said blade.

3. In a carbureter a member having a fuel supply orifice formed therein so as to direct a jet issuing therefrom at an angle to a given plane, a blade which when in proximity to the outlet from the said orifice is set edgewise transversely to the said jet, and means distinguished from the said blade and adapted to cause relative rotational move ment of the said orificed member and the said blade about an axis normal to the said plane.

JOHN M. TUCKER. JAMES ARMST KONG WILDING. Witnesses:

ALFRED C. BioNnLL, G. F. ALLEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4351783 *May 26, 1981Sep 28, 1982Bennett Donald GCombustion fuel and air flow control and mixer apparatus
US4726342 *Jun 30, 1986Feb 23, 1988Kwik Products International Corp.Fuel-air ratio (lambda) correcting apparatus for a rotor-type carburetor for integral combustion engines
US4869850 *Dec 29, 1987Sep 26, 1989Kwik Products International CorporationRotor-type carburetor apparatus and associated methods
USRE33929 *May 12, 1988May 19, 1992Kwik Products International CorporationCentral injection device for internal combustion engines
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/89, 261/40, 48/189.5
Cooperative ClassificationB01D47/16