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Publication numberUS1112544 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1914
Filing dateJul 25, 1911
Priority dateJul 25, 1911
Publication numberUS 1112544 A, US 1112544A, US-A-1112544, US1112544 A, US1112544A
InventorsWalker W Mccarroll
Original AssigneeWalker W Mccarroll
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for rectifying electrotypes.
US 1112544 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. W. MCGARROLL. MACHINE FOR REGTIPYING-,ELEOT'HOTYPES. APPLICATION FILED JULY 25, 1911.

1.1 1 2,544. Patented Oct. 6, 1914.

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W. W. McGARROLL.

MACHINE FOR REGTIFYING ELEGTROTYPES;

APPLICATION FILED JULY 25,1911.

1,1 12,544. Patented 0013.6,1914.

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THE NORRIS PETERS 60.. FHOTOLITHOH WASHINGTON. D. C

W. W. MGOARROLL. MACHINE FOR REGTIFYING ELEGTROTYPES.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 25, 19.11.

1 1 1 2,544. Patented Oct. 6, 1914.

3 SHBETS-SHEET 3.

EICIU YHE NORRIS PETERS CO. FHOTO'LITHOH WASHINCION. D C.

Uivrrnn srarns rarnrrr ora ion] WALKER W. MGCARROLL, F ARLINGTON, NEW JERSEY.

MACHINE FOR RECTIFYING ELECTROTYPES.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, WALKER W. MCCAR- now, a citizen of the United States of America, and a resident of Arlington, Hudson county New Jersey, have invented certaln new and useful Improvements in Machlnes for Rectifying Electrotypes, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to machines for rectifying electrotype plates and the object of the invention is to improve in several particulars the machine for rectifying electrotypes as the same is shown and described by me in a pending application filed April 6, 1911, Serial Number 619,203.

ltlore particularly this invention relates to improvements in the means for operating the glass block and in several novel and useful mechanisms for adjusting the various parts of the machine with a View to increase the efficiency of the machine and its scope of work.

Other objects of the invention are to provide improved supports for the rectifying tools.

The invention will be more fully understood by the following detailed specification read in connection with the accompanying drawings in which- Figure 1 is a front elevation of the ma chine. Fig. 2 is a detail view of a locking mechanism. Fig. 3 is a side elevation lookingfrom the left in Fig. 1 and with parts removed and parts in section for the sake of clearness. Fig. 1 is a fragmentary plan view of the upper operating levers. Figs. 5 and 6 are detail views of an adjusting mechanism for regulating the stroke of the glass. Fig. 7 is a rear detail View of parts of the pressure means for the hammer rod. Fig. 8 is a detail view of the tension device shown in Fig. 7 Fig. 9 is a fragmentary View showing a modified form of tool holder. F 10 is a detail view of the parts shown in Fig. 9. Fig. 11 shows another modified form of tool holder, and Fig. 12 is a diagrammatic view of the glass block and line of tools shown in Fig. 11.

In the application above referred to I have described in detail the construction and operation of the entire machine. Those fea tures, therefore, which are common to the two applications will in the following be referred to in such details only as are necessary for the understanding of this invention.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed July 25, 1911.

Patented Oct. 6, 1914.

Serial No. 640,500.

Referring to the drawings the numeral 9 represents a glass block which is suitably supported in a framework 10 adapted to slide vertically on posts 11 secured to a horizontal slide 12 guided in the frame 13. Below the bed plate 1 1 thereis a tool slide 15 suitably guided in the frame and which carries the tools 16, which may be arranged in three rows of five each as shown. The tool slide andthe glass'slide are connected 1 by the rods 17, 17 joined by the rack piece 18 having a rack 19 operated by the toothed segment 20. The latter is operated by a handle 21 to move the slides horizontally to position any one of the tools in the center of the machine which is indicated by a needle 22. The latter is fast in a sleeve 23 carried by the upright i-veighted member 241 which passes through a slot 12 in the slide 12 as shown in Fig. 1. From this it will be seen that the tools and the glass may be operated sidewise independently of the member 24, the rod 25 of the glass carriage passing loosely through the sleeve 23.

It will be understood in a general way that the glass is provided on its under surface with marks which correspond with the position of the various tools, and that the latter are operated upwardly to punch up the low places in the electrotype which rests on the bed plate while the glass is operated downwardly to provide a resistance against the blows of the tools.

26 is a hammer rod which may be adjusted under any one of the three rows of tools as will be readily understood from Fig. 3. To this end the hammer rod passes through a bearing block 27 which may be moved forward or backward by the lever 28 connected to another lever 29 operated by a handle 30. The hammer rod is supported in a bifurcated free end of a pressure arm 31 which rests on a lug 32 and the rear end of which is pivoted on a stud 33 fast in a block 3 1 guided on rods 35, 35. A spring 36 keeps the block 34 upward against a cam 37 fast on a shaft 38 journaled in a small framework 39 suitably attached to the main frame 13.

66 is a small pulley fast onthe shaft'38 for the purpose of turning the latter to lower block 34 and stud 33.

10 is a coiled spring around the hammer rod and which engages an adjusting nut 11. The hammer rod is for the purpose of putting apressure on the tools before the hammer is operated so that slight blows of the hammer will sui'lice for the operation of the tool and the impression of the latter on the electrotype may be adjusted or regulated to a nicety, at the same time the noise and wear on the machine is reduced.

The operation of the hammer and the hammer rod is accomplished by the following means. a2 is a constantly rotating shaft to which power is applied in any suitable manner and. which carries a cam 43 adapted to engage a cam roll at on the arm 31. On the shaft 42 is also secured a hammer release cam 45 having a deep notch 46. l? is the hammer which is secured to an arm 4:8 loosely pivoted on a transverse rod 4:9. Adjacent the arm &8 there is also loosely journaled on the rod 4.9 a bell crank 50. A rod 51 is connected to the upper arm of the bell crank at 52 and passes downwardly through the end 53 of the arm 48, a coiled expansion hammer spring 54- being interposed between the bell crank and the hammer arm as shown. The forward end of the bell crank is pivoted at 6st to the upper end of a link 55 which in turn is pivoted at 56 to the treadle 57 pivoted at 58 and operated by a foot lever 59. The treadle carries an upright arm 0 to which is pivoted a rod 61 which passes through the link 55 beyond which it carries a coiled spring 62. The hammer arm 48 carries a cam roll 63 which engages the release cam 45. pulley 65 is journaled on the rod d9 but fastto and moves with the bell crank 50. A cable 6'? connects the pulley 65 with the aforesaid pulley 66. lit will be seen that when the treadle 57 is depressed the link is raised and the bell crank 50 is tilted rearward thus compressing the spring and a pres sure is put on the hammer arm 48 tending to force the hammer upwardly. This. however is prevented by the cam 45 until such time when the notch 46 permits an upward movement of the cam roll 6-1 when the hammer L5 is caused to deliver upward blow on the hammer red by the pressure of the hammer spring 54:. At the same time the bell crank 50 is tilted, the pulley 65 is also operated and through the cable 6? and. pulley 66 the shaft 38 is rotated. fhis turns the cam 37 to lower the block 34 and the stud 33 as described and simultaneously therewith the cam 43 engages the cam roll 441- to lift the pressure arm 31. The cams 4-3 and 45 are so timed that the pressure is put on the hammer rod immediately prior to the blow of the hammer. Thus the depression of the treadle causes the lowering of the stud 33 and the cam roll 141 to enable the cam 43 to again lift the arm 31 to press the hammer rod against the tools and also con1 presses the spring 54- which in turn acts on the hammer. The hammer rod is lowered positively after the blow by a spring 68 and the treadle spring (52 serves to restore the treadle to normal position.

lVhen the pressure on the treadle is removed the stud 33 is raised by the rotating of the shaft 38 in the reverse direction. This may be accomplished by the construction shown in Fig. 8 where it will be seen that the shaft 88 carries another pulley A. cable 70 is fast to the latter and passes down over a pulley 71 and upward again, where it is secured to the frame 39. A spring 72 forces the pulley 71 downward. It will be seen that the stud 33 is moved up and down perpendicularly so that the cam 43 will enge the cam roll 4-4; at the same time during each revolution. In the application above referred to the pivot of the pressure arm is operated by an eccentric which causes a slightly forward and backward motion of the cam roll .41- thus introducing a disturl ing factor in the operation.

On the shaft 42 is a cam 73 on which run two cam rolls 74E carried by a fork 75 to which is secured a rod 76. The top of this red carries a head 77 to which is secured two other rods 78 and 79 suitably guided in the frame as shown. The rod 79 through the end of the lever 80 which opcrates the above mentioned member 24- for reciprocating the glass. The lever 80 is pivoted at 81 to a link 82 which is pivoted at 83 to the frame to take up play. @n each side of the lever 80 there is on the rod 79 a spring 84 adjustable by nuts 85.

@n the frame there is pivoted a member 86 for adjusting the position and the stroke of the glass. See F 5. This member 86 is in the form of an upper and lower bell crank 8. 87 having a hub 88 pivoted on a vertical adjusting screw 89 which is journaled in the f ame at 90, 90. The bell cranks carry set screws 91 and 92. This adjusting member may be thrown from one side to another around. the screw to bring the set screws into line with the lever 80, see also Fig. 4. A spring latch 93 keeps the memher in either the one or the other position as will be clearly seen in 6. The screw 89 is for the purpose of adjusting the position of the adjustin member.

It will be seen from 1 that the left end of the lever 80 may be raised or lowered by adjusting the member 86 which positions the glass above the bed plate for a thick or a thin electrotype and by adjusting the screws 91 or 92 different strokes of the lever 80 are obtained.

The double springs 84 are for the purpose of making the operation of the glass smooth and to eliminate noise by alternately serving as cushions for the stroke of the lever 80; lhe operation is more smooth and free from sudden ars because as the lower spring lifts the lever 80 as far as the set screws 91 or 92 will permit, further movement of the rod 79 results in compression of said spring while the upper spring cushions the upward movement of the lever and on the return stroke the upper spring forces down the lever 80 against the lower spring. I have found in practice that by the cooperation of the member 86 and the double springs 8% I am able to regulate the operation of the glass so as to barely lift the same from the electrotype and much better work may be done on the machine. The lever 80 is normally locked by a stop 9% on a stud 95. A set screw 96 in the lever 80 rests on the stop-but when the latter is moved down the lever 80 is free to reciprocate. The stop is operated from the treadle 57 by a cable 97.

It will be understood from the foregoing and the application referred to that during the normal operation of the machine the electrotype rests on the bed plate and that when the treadle is depressed the lever 80 is released and the glass is free to operate while for each revolution of the shaft &2 a tool is operated by the hammer upwardly against the glass, and that the latter and the tools may be adjusted sidewise of the machine from time to time as the work progresses. During this operation the stroke of the lever 80 is regulated by the set screws 91 the member 86 having first been properly adjusted. Before and after the rectifying proper the electrotype plates require straightening or leveling and this is accomplished by a hammer which is caused to operate on the member 24- in a manner similar to the operation of the hammer 4C7 on the hammer rod. The result sought to be accomplished is that of delivering hammer blows on the member 24 while the latter is pressing the glass down on the electrotype as thereby excessive pounding on and perhaps cracking of the electrotype is avoided. pose I provide a hammer 97 carried by an arm 98 pivoted on the frame at 99 and oscillated through the instrumentality of a short arm 100 and a link 101 pivoted on a block 102 which latter is operated by the aforesaid rod 78 by double springs 103. Hence the block 102 is operated in a manner similar to the operation of the lever 80 as above described. The springs 103 are adjustable by nuts 10%. Normally the block 102 is locked by a cam 105 operated by a handle 106, see Fig. 2.

A rod 107 abuts the block 102 from below and is kept upward by means of a spring 108. The rod 107 is connected to a treadle 109 by a link 110 so that when the treadle is depressed the rod is moved down, and at the same time the lever 80 is released because the cable 97 is connected by a cable 111 to the said treadle 109 as shown in Fig. 1.

When it is desired to straighten an electrotype the member 36 is swung around to For this purbring the screws 92 over the lever 80 as above explained. Thereafter the cam 105 is rotated by the handle 106 to free the block 102. The handle 106 may then rest on a stop 112. When now the treadle 109 is depressed the stop 94: is moved downto release the lever 80 and the rod 107 is also moved down to free the block 102 which then is reciprocated by the rod 78 to operate the hammer 97.

The springs Sff and 103 are so adjusted that during the combined operation of the glass and the hammer 97,the latter descends a little later than the glass which at this time has a greater stroke due to the adjust ment of the'block 86 and the screws 92. The result is that the glass descends to press the electrotype down and immediately thereafter the hammer 97 delivers the blow. The advantage of having the member 86 is now apparent because all the operator has to do after the setting of the set screws 91 and 92 is to swing the member one way or another to obtain the desired stroke of the lever 80 and the glass. Thus repeated adjustments for each different operation for either straightening the plate or rectifying the same are eliminated.

113 is a treadle shoe operated by levers 114; to regulate the depth to which the treadle 57 may be depressed. I

Referring now to Figs. 9 and 10 it will be seen that the tools 16 are carried in a segment shaped tool holder 14%: suitably pivoted at 115 and operated by a toothed segment 116 and a rack 117 which latter is connected by a brace 118 to the rod 17 fast in the glass slide 12. The brace 118 may be operated by the means above described for operating the toolholder and glass or other suitable mechanism may be employed. It will be seen that as the glass is moved laterally, the tool holder 1&4 is oscillated to bring the proper tool into the central position.

In Fig. 11 l have shown a rotating glass carrier 119 while the tools are set in the tool holder 120 in a single row.

12 illustrates diagrammatically the relative position of the tools and the marks on the glass. The line of the tools is marked 121 and 122 are the tool marks on the glass. The glass is rotated from the shaft 123 by the bevels gears 12%, 12 1. The shaft 123 carries another gear 125 which drives the gear 126 on the shaft 127. This latter carries a gear which engages a rack 129 provided with teeth 130 for the operation of the toothed segment 131 as will be clear from the drawing. By turning the handle 132 the glass is rotated and the tool holder oscillated together.

It will be s en that I have provided several new elements in machines of this charactor to enable the operator to operate the machine with as little delay as possible, at

the same time providine' for nick action of ing an electrctype, a mo able member havin a ggl: ss hlocl: adapted to be operated to straight-2n the electrotype, a hammer and lnoclian'iijm :tor operating the latter and the eel menher to cause the latter to press and to cause t 1e electrotyina a strike a l;

the said glass block d against the electrotype. ihe combination of means for suportini an electrotype, a block sus- OW on the said memhas been l pended above the same, means for operating the said glass block to exert a pressure on the electrotype, a hammer and means for operation the hammer to deliver a blow on the said glass block ail; r the latter has been presswd against the electrotype.

5;. The combination of means for supporting an electrt ype means adapted to be ogeratwl to strai hten the elcctrotype and compi i block for exerting; a pressure the t ectrotype and. a hamn er i'or delivern-i a blow on the said glass hloclc and incchani m for operating the aforesaid meai whereby the class hlocl; is armed to more toward the e lrotj'pe 1n advailce oil tl operation oi the said hammer.

l. The comhinatien 0. means for supporting an electrotype, a glass hlocl; si spended above the said supporting means, mechatiiism for reciprocating the said block, a pivoted adjusting hlocli 7 and means for setting the same into two dn'ierent positions to re.. alate the operations of the said glas block.

J3. The combination of a glass block, sappori'iine' means therefor, a hamn'ier adapted o strike the said sin )ortin means, mechanism for operating the said glass block and the said hammer, vertically reciprocating rods, springs cariicd by the said rods and adapted to ene e on the top and on the bottom 01 the said operating means for the hannner and the grh block and means for adjusting tension of the said springs.

(l. The combination of a glass block and a hannncr adapted to he operated to straighter an eleta'rotype, vertically operated rods for actuating the said glass block and hammer at the same time springs carried by the said rods means for operating the latter and means for adjusting the said springs to :anse the said glass block to descend in advance of the said hamn'ier.

T The combination of a hlocln a lever for operz'itin r the same, a pivoted link sn' iporting the said lever, springs engaging the latter on the top and the bottom thereof,

a pii oted adjusting block, stops carried by the latter and. adapted to cooperate With the said lever to limit the motions thereof, means for adjusting the tension of the said springs and means for actuating the latter to operate the said lever.

8. The combination of a plurality of reetiil'ying tools, a hammer rod, an arm engaging the same, a cam for operating said arm but normally out of engagement therewith, a guide block, means for pivoting the said arm on the same means engaging said guide block to keep the said arm out of engagement with the said cam and mechanism for lowering the guide hlocl': perpendicularly to h 1g; the said arm into engagement with the said cam.

9. The combination of a plurality of rectifying tools, a hammer rod, an arm engaging the latter, a cam tor operating sail 1112' a but normally out of engagement therewil a guide hloclr supporting the one end of said arm, a cam for operating the said guide block vertically to lower the said arm into operative proximity to the said first named for operating the said guide rod to press said tools and means for ope ating the sa id hammer iii-:e the said hammer red when the haimner 15 released.

11. The combination of a plurality of rectifyi 1g to'ls, a han'imer rod, a hammer striking "he lat to operate the said tools, a cam for keeping the said hammer in a given inactive position and for periodi- "ally releasing the same a se "and cam for lifting the said hammer rod to press against tne said tools and a spring for operating the hammer to strike against the said hammer red when the hanimer released.

he omhination of a plurality of recti g tools, a hammer rod, a lnnnmer tor strnnng th, latter to or erate the said tools a cam for keeping the said hammer in a gii'en inactive position and to" periodi- :ally leasing the same, a second cam for lifting the said hann'ner rod to press against the said tools, a lit nnner spring for actnating the hi-nnmer to stri e against the said red when the hammer is released and means for rot: ting the said two cams.

13. The combination of a pli rality of rectifying tools; a hammer rod v a hamme" for striliine the latt r to operate the sait tools a cam in engagement wit: the said lan mer to iieep the same inactive and provided with a cut out portion for periodically releasing the hammer, a pressure arm in engagement with the said hammer rod, a treadle, means operated by the latter for lowering the said arm, means for lifting said pressure arm into engagement with the said tools before the said hammer is released and a spring for actuating the hammer to strike against the said hammer rod after the hammer is released.

14. The combination of a plurality of rectifying tools, a hammer rod, a hammer for striking the latter to operate the said tools, a cam in engagement with the hammer to keep the same inactive and provided with a cut out portion for releasing the hammer, a pressure arm in engagement with the said hammer rod, a treadle, means operated by the latter for lowering the said pressure arm, means for lifting the latter into engagement with the said tools before the hammer is released, a spring for actuating the hammer to strike against the said hammer rod and means for automatically lifting the said pressure arm after the hammer has been actuated.

15. The combination of a glass block bearing tool marks on its lower surface, a plurality of tools supported below the said glass block and means for reciprocating the latter and the tools simultaneously in a rectilinear horizontal direction.

16. The combination of a glass block hearing tool marks on its lower surface, a plurality of tools supported below the said glass block, means for reciprocating the latter and the tools simultaneously in a rectilinear horizontal direction and means for operating the glass block and the tools in a vertical direction.

17. The combination of a plurality of rectifying tools, a glass block supported above the same and adapted to cooperate therewith, means for operating the said glass block and tools together in ahorizontal direction and means for operating the glass block independent of the said tools.

18. The combination of a glass block, a plurality of rectifying tools below the same, means for moving both the said glass block and the said tools manually in a rectilinear horizontal direction to place one of the said tools in a given position and automatic means for operating the said glass and the one said tool toward one another.

19. The combination of a. frame, guides formed in the same, a glass slide movable in said guides, a glass carriage mounted on the said slide and movable therewith and means for operating the said glass carriage at an angle to the said glass slide.

20. The combination of a frame, a glass slide, means for operating the said glass slide on the said frame, posts in said glass slide, a glass carriage mounted to move on the said posts, means for operating said glass slide horizontally and means for opcrating the said glass carriage on the said posts. Y

21. The combination of aplurality of rectifying tools, a hammer rod, a hammer for striking the latter to force one of the said tools upward and means for causing the said hammer rod to exert a pressure on the said tool before the hammer strikes the hammer rod.

22. The combination of a plurality of rect'fying tools, a hammer rod, a hammer for striking the said hammer rod to force one of the said tools upward, means for causing the said hammer rod to exert a pressure on the said tool before the hammer strikes the hammer rod and means for adjusting the pressure.

23. The combination of a plurality of rectifying tools, a hammer rod, a hammer for striking the latter to force one of the said tools pward, mechanism for causing the said hammer rod to exert a pressure on the said tool, means for adjusting the blow of the hammer and mechanism for causing the said pressure to increase as the blows of the hammer become stronger.

24. The combination of a plurality of rectifying tools, a hammer rod, a hammer for striking the latter to operate one of the said tools, and mechanism for pressing the said hammer rod against the tool to be operated and for actuating the said hammer.

25. The combination of a plurality of rectifying tools, a hammer rod, a hammer for striking the latter to operate one of the said tools, means for setting the said hammer rod to operate on a given tool and means for operating the hammer to strike a blow on the said hammer rod.

26. The combination of a glass block, a plurality of rectifying tools, means for moving the said block and the tools simultaneously in a horizontal direction, a hammer rod, means for pressing the same against any one of the said tools and a hammer for striking the said hammer rod to operate the said tool against the said glass block.

27. The combination of a plurality of rectifying tools, a hammer rod, an arm engaging the latter, a cam for periodically lifting said arm to press tne said hammer rod against one of the said tools, a hammer and means for operating the said hammer and the said cam.

28. The combination of a pluraility of rectifying tools, a hammer rod, an arm engaging the same, a cam for operating said arm but normally out of engagement therewith, a hammer and mechanism for operating the said hammer and for bringing the said arm into engagement with the said cam to cause the latter to lift the said arm to cause the said hammer rod to press against one of the said tools before the hammer is operated.

29. The combination of a plurality of rectifying teels, a glass block supported above the same, means for operating the said block and the said tools together a hammer red, means for positioning the latter under a given tool a hammer mechanism for causing said hammer rod to press against one 01 said teols and means for operating the said hammer to strike a blow against the hami'ner rod after the latter has been pressed against the said tool.

Signed at New York, In. Y. this 20 day of July 1911.

"WALKER W MCGARROLL;

ll itnesses K. G. LEARD, :LVAN KoNIesnERe.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Gommissioner of Patents. Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4050271 *May 7, 1976Sep 27, 1977Noel C. Jones & Associates, Inc.Apparatus for repairing indentions in a rigid skin
US4220035 *Dec 21, 1978Sep 2, 1980Jansen Herfeld RoettgerDevice for the straightening of thin metallic parts especially sheets
US4510789 *Dec 10, 1982Apr 16, 1985Kabushiki Kaisha Komatsu SeisakushoPress brake
US5088312 *Jun 8, 1990Feb 18, 1992Wafios Maschinenfabrik Gmbh & Co.Upsetting device for upsetting the ends of elongated workpieces such as wire pieces
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/37, 72/442, 29/21, 101/401.3, 72/435
Cooperative ClassificationB21D1/06