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Publication numberUS1112582 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1914
Filing dateOct 7, 1913
Priority dateOct 7, 1913
Publication numberUS 1112582 A, US 1112582A, US-A-1112582, US1112582 A, US1112582A
InventorsFrank R Whittlesey
Original AssigneeFrank R Whittlesey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric heater.
US 1112582 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. R.WHITTLESEY. ELECTRIC HEATER.

APPLICATION FILED 001 .7, 1913. v

1,1 12,582. Patented Oct. 6, 1914.

WI M58858 [NYE/V703 B) I if: 4M225.

A HORNE) i use it known that I, FRANK R. weimt UNITED snares ra'rnnr OFFICE.

FRANK IR. WHITTL ESEY, OLE GARLAND, CALIFORNIA.

niinc'r arc Hearse.

1 '0 an whom it may concern:

sleigh citizen of the United States, residing at Oakland, in the county Off rlrlameda and State of California, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Electric Heaters, of which the following is a specilfication. v

M invention relates tothe general class of e ectric-heatersl It is adapted for heatin devices of various kinds, but particular y for those which, from the nature of their use, such, for example, as radiators for Warmin rooms and articularl as'Cookers, require to receive and to impart diil'er' ent degrees of heat, according to circumstances. a

Theobjeot of my invention is to provide a simple and efi'ective electrimheatcr'for these and like purposes; and to this end my invention consists in the novel heater which I shall now fully describe by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a perspective view of my heater. Fig.2 is a perspective view of the heating member showing its grooved upper face. Fig. 3 is a bottom planof the heat.-

ing member showing its grooved lower face.

Fig. 4; is a section, enlarged, through the heating member on the line m-w of this figure showing also, in. section, the 1nclosing box andthe asbestos protection of the heating wire.

;1 is theheating member. consists er a plate or body low electricand heat conductivity. It may be of any suitable mate-- rial or combination of materials having such property. In practical employ aslab oi Portland cement or concrete. In this plate 1, in its upper surface, as seen in Fig. 2,

are formed. the grooves for the electric heating Wire, and in its lower surface, as seen in Fig. 3, are formed similar grooves 3. In case a concrete slab is vised, these grooves are host molded in the material. The grooves inay be directed in any suitable extensive, tortuous course, in order to cover practically the superficial area of the slab. Ihcy are best formed in the continuous return or zi-g-zag course shown. In the upper face the groove 2 begins at one end of the slab, asshjown in Fig. 2, and thence extendstback "and forth, with its turns near but not reaching nor exposed to the ends, to the opposite side of the slab where it Mons out in the same end. or? the or the same end in which the l Patented Oct; 6, 1914,

down in said end and joins the beginning of the groove 3 of the lower face, by means of a short vertical groove 4 in said end. The lower groove, 3, 'as shown in Fig. 3, returns in the'lower face of the slab in similar manner, to the first side, where it opens out in started. t 5 is the wire for conducting the electric current. It starts in the groove 2 at its beupper groove ginning and is then laid throughout the,

course of said groove, thence passes down the vertical connecting groove 4 to the lower groove 3, in which it returns to the exit of said lower groove.

In the end of the slab 1, atthe beginning of the groove 2 is made the permanent electricalconnection, indicated at the point 6 in Fig. 1, with the beginning of the heating wire 5. 'In the end of the slab at the opposite side of said end is a socket 7 adapted to receive an electric plug connection with the wire 5 as it passes down in the vertical 1 connecting groove 4. In the same end of the slab at one or more points between its sides,

here shown, for the sake ofillustration,-as

at one point, is a socket 8 for the reception of an electric plug-connection, with the lower wire course'i'n the lower groove 3. Finally at the first side of the slab end is ncction with the issuing end of the heating WlYG I I' 10 indicates asbestos or other-like material a socket 9 to receive an electric plug confor sealing the wire" 5 in its grooves and protecting it from contact with the exterior casing or box of the slab.

11 is an iron casing or box with legs 12. This box comprises a bottom and sides and ends, the latter rising above the slab and re ceiving between them the removable iron top-plate 13. In one end of this box are made openings 14 which register with the several sockets in the slab end, so that the plug connections, heretofore mentioned, can be made.

15 is a double electric cord leading from the source of electric current. The. end of one cord is permanently connected at 6, in Fig. 1, with the beginning of the wire 5. The other cord carries a plug 16, adapted to fit any of the sockets 7, 8 or 9. When the plug 16 is fitted to the socket 7, the electric the plug 10 is fitted to the socket 9, the current [lows through both upper and lower wire ,eourses, and having the greatest resistance will give to the slab 1, the lowest heat. 'lzen said plug 16 is fitted to the socket 8, the current will flow through a part only of the lower wire course and through the entire upper course, and will impart to the slab an intermediate heat. Therefore, in operating the device, different heats may be obtained, as desired. For example, in using the deviici as a cooker, the )lug 16 will first be fitted to the socket 7 so that the slab 1 may be quickly and highly heated. Then, when sultieiently heated, the slab, on account of its low conductivity and its ability to retain heat, may well have its heat increment reduced, and this may be done by fitting the plug to the socket S, or, in case the lowest heat be sulfieient, the plug will be inserted in the socket 9.

I claim '1. An clectric-neater comprising a heating member of low electric and heat condnc-,

tivity, said member having formed in its upper and lower faces a continuous tortuous groove the ends of which emerge from the member at one end near one side thereof, one above the other, and the middle portlon passing from the upper to the lower face in said end near the other side thereof, said end beingformed with pluga'eceiving, sockets z t the ends of the groove and at points intermediate said ends; an electric wire seated in said groove and exposed for electrical contact in the sockets of said member; a double electric cord one cord of which is electrically connected with the beginning of the electricheating-wire; and a plug carried by the other cord adapted to be fitted at will to any of the sockets of the l'ieating member, to make electrical contact with the heating wire at various points in the length of said wire.

2. An electric-limiter comprising a heating member of low electric and heat conductivity, said member having formed in its upper and lower faces a continuous tortuous groove the ends of which emerge from the member at one end near one side thereof, one above the other, and the middle portion passing fronithe upper to the lower face in said end near the other side thereof, said end being formed with plug-receiving sockets at the ends of they groove and at points intermediate said ends; seated in said groove and exposed for electrical contact in the sockets of said memher; a metallic box" inclosingsaid heating member saidbox having openings registering with the sockets ofisaid. member; means for insulating the-heating Wire from the metallic box; a double electric cord one cord of which is electrically connected with the beginning of theelect1'ic-heating-wire; and a plug carried by the other cord adapted to be fitted at heating member, to make electrical contact with the heating wire at various points in the length of said wire.

An electric heatercomprising a substantially rectangular block formed on each of its faces with a tortuous groove, the groove of one face communicating with the groove of the other face, a heating wire lying in said groove, a casing receiving the block, a closure for the casing, a filling of asbestos 'intcrposed between the faces of the block and the casing, said asbestos entering the grooves formed in said faces, there being openings formed in the casing which aline with openings formed. in the edges of the block whereby to permit of the insertion of,

an electric connection to effect a connection with the heating wire at different points throughout itslen th' to increase or diminish the resistance,

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification inthc presence of two subscribing witnesses.

' FRANK R. WI-IITTLESEY. Witnesses:

WM. F. BoorH,

S. Consrmn.

an electric wire' will to any of the sockets of the-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4415798 *Sep 16, 1980Nov 15, 1983Ilona KnappePlate for radiant heating or similar effects
US5413032 *Aug 18, 1994May 9, 1995The Middleby CorporationRestaurant type griddle with modular construction and which is load sensitive
US6614007 *Feb 17, 1999Sep 2, 2003The Garland GroupGriddle plate with infrared heating element
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/458.1, 219/465.1, 338/247, 338/253
Cooperative ClassificationH05B3/68