Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1116912 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1914
Filing dateMay 14, 1914
Priority dateMay 14, 1914
Publication numberUS 1116912 A, US 1116912A, US-A-1116912, US1116912 A, US1116912A
InventorsRobert T Parisen
Original AssigneeLawson Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas-burner.
US 1116912 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. T. PARISEN.

GAS BURNER.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 14, 1914.

1 1 1 6,91 2. Patented Nov. 10, 1914.

INVENTOR WITNESSES z f l w NORRIS PETERS :0 PHOTO-LITHO wAsHlNLilun, u. u,

\ UNITED STATES PATENT oFFIoE.

ROBERT r. PARISEN, or KNOXVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR To LAW-SON MANN-7 FAGTURING COMPANY, OF HOMESTEAD,- PENNSYLVANIA, A. CORPORATION OF PENNSYLVANIA.

GAS-BURNER.

i Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed May 14, 1914. Serial N 0. 838,486.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, ROBERT T. 'PAnIsnN, citizen of the United States, and resident of Knoxville, in the county of Allegheny and State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Gas-Burners, of which the following is a specification. A

While the present invention relates to a gas burner which is adapted for various uses, it has particular reference to the requirements of a burner for'instantaneous Water heaters wherein it is desired to produce perfect combustion from a relatively large flow of gas such as prevails during the intermittent periods when the burners of such heaters are active. The simple and highly eflicien't construction in which the invention is embodied provides for effectually separating the gas emitting portion of the delivery chamber from the portion thereof in communication with the mixer or receiving chamber, thereby eliminating back firing, and this is accomplished without harmful restriction of the gas emitting space so that there is ample provision for a copious flow to the burner orifices.

The invention is further directed to those structural features of the burner which provides for ready insertion of the perforate diaphragm and for affording quick and convenient access thereto for removal or other purposes. v

I In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a vertical central cross-section of the improved burner. Fig. 2 is a view of the burner with one-half thereof in front elevation and the other half in longitudinal section. Fig. 3 is an end view of the discharge chamber with the diaphragm'in position and with the closure cap removed.

Referring to the drawings, 2 designates a conventional form of burner body which incloses a fuel-receiving or mixing chamber 3 having at its lower end the usual gas con nection 4 and the air inlets 5.

Formed integral with the upper end of body 2 is the horizontally elongated dis charge chamber 6 having its interior of substantially circular form about a horizontal axis. Chamber 6 is open at its opposite ends at 7 and these openings are smaller than the chamber interior which results in the formation of flanges 8 which form the end walls of the gas emitting space 9 of the delivery chamber. At opposite sides of the lower portion of theinterior ofchamber 6 are the longitudinal abutment-forming ribs 10 which extend from end .to end. of the chamber and which are 'adaptedto receive the longitudinal edges of the upwardly arched perforate diaphragm 11 which separates the gas emitting space 9 from portion 12 of the delivery chamber which'is in communication with receiving chamber 3. The diaphragm is adapted to be entered through either end opening 7 with its extremities bearing against the end flanges 8, and this feature together with the engagement of the diaphragm edges with abutments 10 cffectually separate the chamber spacesv 9 and 12. v

lVith the diaphragm in position, the opposite. ends of the discharge chamber are closed by the cap-like devices 13. Each cap is formed with a central inset portion 14, and one of these insets is adapted to receive the head 16 of a tie bolt 15 and with the depression of the other "cap receiving the nut 16. This construction affords readyaccess to the burner interior and by means thereof the diaphragm may be readily inserted or removed.

The gas is emitted from space 9 at the exterior of diaphragm 11 through a plurality of apertures 17 in thewall of chamber 6, these apertures extending from end to end of the chamber and providing for a copious outflow of properly mixed air-and gas,1ample supply therefor being available from the relatively large discharge space 9, so that when the burner is in operation there is no retarding or choking tendency. Apertures 17 are protected from dripping condensate bythe lip-like, guard 18 formed integrally with the top of chamber 6 and extending from end to end thereof and so inclined as to overhang the burner apertures, as clearly shown. in Fig. l. w

The construction ofthe burner is simple and inexpensive, chambers 2 and 6 and the diaphragm-holding means being embodied in a, single casting, the. only 'separate or separable partsbeing the diaphragm itself and the end closing caps and tie bolt. I claim z- 1. In a gas burner. thecombination ofa fuel-receiving chamber, a horizontally 'elOngated open-end discharge chamber communicating with the receiving. chamber and formed with gas omitting apertures, a per- H 2. In a gas burner, the combination of a fuel-receiving chamber, a horizontally elongated discharge chamber in. communication with the receiving chamber and having its upper portion formed with gas emitting openings, and a. horizontally elongated diaphragm. within the discharge chamber and spaced from the top and opposite sides thereof with the portion of the chamber at the exterior of the diaphragm in free communication with the gas emitting openings and the portion. of thec-hamber'at the inner side of the diaphragm in. unobstructed com.- m-unication with the receiving chamber, and abutments at, opposite sides of the lower portion of the discharge chamber adapted communication with they gas emitting aper tures and with said space separated from the portion of the chamber which communicates with the receiving chamber;

4. Ina gas. burner, the combination of a fuel-receiving: chamber, a. horizontally elon gated open en'd discharge chamber having gas emitting apertures in its upper portion,

ribs extending longitudinally" of the interior of the dis-charge chamber, a horizontallyelongated perforate diaphragm adapted? to be entered in thexdischa-rge chamber through its open end with.- the longitudinal edges of the diaphragm engaging the ribs, the diaphragm separating the portion of the discharge chamber from which the gas is emitted from that portion which. communicates with the receiving chamber, and end closing means for the discharge; chamber.

5. In a: gas burner, the combination of a fuel-receiving chamber, a, horizontally elongated: discharge chamber communicating with the fuel-receiving chamber and fbrm ed with gas. emitting apertures, the: discharge chamber being open at its opposite: ends: and

with the end openings smaller thanthe dis charge. chamber cavity, .31.. perforate dia phragm extending from end to end of the v discharge chamber with the ends of the diaphragm entered in the end openings of the chamber and thereby separating the gas emitting space at the exterior of the diaphragm from that portion of the discharge chamber which communicates with the re- "ceiving chamber, and means for closing the ends of the discharge chamber.

6. In a gas burner, the combination of a fuel-receiving chamber, a horizontally elongated discharge chamber in communication 1 therewith and open at its oppositev ends and "formed with gasemitting apertures, longitudinal abutments within the discharge chamber at opposite sldes thereof, a l'lOIlzcntally elongated perforate diaphragm j having its longitudinal edges in engagement 1 with said abutments and thereby separating the gas emitting portion ofthe discharge chamberfrom the portlon thereof which communlcates with the recelvmg chamber,

'1 and closing means for the end openings of the dischargechamberi to be engaged by the longituchnal'edges of 1 7 In a gas burner, the combination of a g fuel-receiving chamber, a; horizontally elon-' gated discharge chamber in colnn'iunication therewith. and open at its opposite ends and with the upper portion: of the discharge chamber formed with gas emitting apertures, a perforate diaphragm adapted to be entered the chamber through an end opening thereof and separating: the gas emitting portion of the discharge chamber from the portion thereof which communicates with -,'the receiving chamber, closures at the op posite open ends of the discharge chamber, and a closure-connecting tie; bolt extendmg jthrough the discharge chamber.

8; In a gas burner,.the-combination of a f-ueel-receiving chamber, a horizontally elongated: delivery chamber in: communication therewith and open at its opposite ends and having its upper portion formed with gas :emitting apertures, a perforate diaphragm adapted to be entered: through an open end of the discharge chamber for separating the gas emitting portion of the chamber from ROBERT T, PARISEN.

Witnesses:

J. M. Nnsn'rr, F. E. GAITHER- Copies of this patent may be obtained for five centseach. by addressinz the Commissioner of Patenta, Washington, D 0."

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4793800 *Aug 7, 1987Dec 27, 1988Lochinvar Water Heater CorporationGas water heater/boiler
US5022352 *May 31, 1990Jun 11, 1991Mor-Flo Industries, Inc.Burner for forced draft controlled mixture heating system using a closed combustion chamber
US5085579 *Mar 25, 1991Feb 4, 1992Mor-Flo Industries, Inc.Powered chamber combustion system and burner therefor
US5240411 *Feb 10, 1992Aug 31, 1993Mor-Flo Industries, Inc.For use in a domestic water heater
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/553.3, 431/346, 239/288, 239/556
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/14