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Publication numberUS1120686 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1914
Filing dateSep 25, 1913
Priority dateSep 25, 1913
Publication numberUS 1120686 A, US 1120686A, US-A-1120686, US1120686 A, US1120686A
InventorsEdward T Burrowes
Original AssigneeEdward T Burrowes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metal fly-screen.
US 1120686 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. T. BURRUWES.

METAL FLY SCREEN.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. :5, 1913.

Patented Dec. 15, 1914.

rrn sa ne :EDWARD T. BURROWES, OF PORTLANDfMAINEL:

METAL FLY-SCREEN.

Specification of Letters Patent. y

Application led September 25, 1913. Serial No. 791,780.

entirely of metal.

It has heretofore been proposed to construct screen frames wholly of sheet metal. It has also been proposed to form such frames entirely ofnsolid metal bars and forged corner pieces.

'lhe present invention contemplates a rigid screen frame in which sheet metal side members are combined with solid forged or cast corner pieces, and one object is to provide improved means for unitingr the parts so as to insure the necessary strength. The solid corner pieces produce great rigidity, while the-use of sheet -metal for the side members hasthe advantage of cheapness and lightness. i

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved wire holding molding, and means for retaining it in position.

XVith the above objects in View, the `invention consists in the construction and arrangement of parts hereinafter described and claimed, and illustrated in thev accompanying drawings, in Which,

Figure lis a view of one corner of a fly screen constructed in accordance with my invention; Fig. 2 is a detached view showing the improved corner piece which I employ; Fig. y3 is a longitudinal section through the corner niece and one of the side members shown in Fig. l; Fig. l is a transverse section through one form of side member showing the wire netting and the wire holding molding in position; Fig. 5 is a transverse section through a side member of slightly modified construction; Fig. 6 is a similar view showing still another modification; Fig. T is a similar view illustrating a slightly different arrangement; Fig. Sis a section through one of the side members and illustrating a modified form of wire holding molding in positiontherein; Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8, showinga still further modified form of side member, and

wire holding molding; Figs. I10 and 11 are'I transverse sections showing 'slightly modified forms of molding; Fig. 12 is a similar View showingthe'molding illustrated 'in Fig 8; Fig. 13 is a fragmentary view showing the blank from which the side member" Patented Dec.` 15,1914.

shown in Figi 6 is formed; and, Fig. 14 is) a fragmentary view lof the blankl from which the" molding 'shown 4in F l0 is formed.l

Referring to the draw-ings indetail, I propose to construct a rigid screen frame of solidforged-or cast corner Vpieces .4X-B,- sheet'metal side members C, and sheet metal molding D. The' corner cial and peculiar'construction, and are illus-5 tratedin Fig. 2. These corner pieces each comprise portions A and B disposed atright' angles to'each other.v Along the 'inner and outer edges of the' corner pieces extend pieces are of sperounded beads 'l and 2,'which beads are `eX tended at each'end beyond the Abody portion of thecorner piece so arms l-2, lb-2b, preferably more or less tapered' at their ends; A web or body por; t1on'3 unites the beads land 2. This web as to form 'projecting is thickest at the corner'and gradually ta- I pers toward each end, where it terminates in a feather edge 3 and 3b. there is provided a boss 4', having a tapped hole 4: formed therein. The web 3 also has' a rivet hole 5 formed" adjacent each end At the Cornel"4 thereof. A shoulder G extends around the" sides and bottom of each member of the corner piece at a point between the rivet hole 5 and boss 4.

' Thefside members of my improved frame are formed' from a sheet metal blank in the i nature of a strip. They edges of this strip are turned up and thenibent over, as clearly' shown at 8 9, in Fig.' 4, so as to form a channel-shaped' element having aV fiat" bottom l0, and tubular or beaded portions eX- tending along each edge.` The bead at thef' outer edge, formed by the portion 8, is made slightly higher than the bead on the'inner edge, so as to be flush with the surfacev of the wire netting, as clearly shown in Fig. 4.

The extreme edges of the portions 8--9 may be secured to the bottom l0 of the channel as by soldering, and to this end these edges may be turned inward as indicated at 11 in Fig. 5. ln order to avoid soldering, the

side members may fbe formed as indicated at C2 in Fig.' 6. According to this construcgiel tion, the blank from which the member is formed is provided with two series of perforations 12, and the edges of the blank are furnished with teeth or prongs 13, which are adapted to pass through the perforations 12 and be riveted down, as clearly shown in Fig. 6.

With any of these constructions, it will be observed that the beaded or tubular portions of the side members are substatially rigid, while the bottom 10 is more orA less resilient. The wire holding molding is preferably in the form of a channel l), and is pressed down into the side members, as shown in Fig. 4, confining the wire netting E between itself and the beaded or tubular portions 8 and 9. The resilience of the bottom 10 of the side members permits the beaded portions to spring slightly apart so as to allow the molding to be forced between them; such molding is then frictionally gripped and will be held in position. This frictional holding of the molding will be rendered more eli'ective and certain if the side members are constructed as shown at C5 in Fig. 9. By reference to this figure, it will be seen that the edges of the blank are so folded as to form a channel, which is Wider at the bottom, as shown at 23, than at the top. It will be understood that this shape of channel may be readily employed with any of the forms of said members shown in Figs. 4, 5, 6, and 7. When a channel of this shape is used, the wire holding molding will, of course, be made flaring at the bottom, such molding being illustrated at D5 in Fig. 9.

To construct a frame, four corner pieces, such as shown in Fig. 2, are selected, and four side members, such as C, are cut to the proper length. The arms, such as laa, of the corner pieces are then inserted in the open ends of the tubular portions of the side members, and pushed in until the ends of the side members abut against the shoulders 6'. When so assembled, the web portion, such as 3b, (see Fig. 3) will rest upon the bottom of the channel C and rivets 7, or other suitable fastening devices, may be passed through the holes 5 and similar holes in the side members and the parts thus secured together. In order .to permit the corner pieces to be thus inserted in the `ends of the side members, it is necessary to slightly cut away the extreme ends of the turned-over portions 8 and 9, to accommodate the web 3, as will be readily understood. To increase the rigidity of the frame, the arms 1a, 2, etc. are preferably soldered or brazed into the tubular portions of the side members, and the web 3 may be similarly secured to the bottom of the channel. In some cases, the use of the fastening devices 7 may thus be rendered unnecessary.

After the corner pieces and side members s threaded openings 4 formed in the corner pieces. Thus, the raw edges are concealed and a neat and lfinished appearance produced. In order to still further insure the locking of the molding to the side members, I. may, in some cases, form the side members as indicated at C3, in Fig. 7. In this 'lig'.lre I have shown two series of openings 14, similar' to the openings 12, formed in the turned-over edges of the side members, and in connection with this there is employed the molding D, shown in Fig. 10, and having along its edges out-turned teeth or by means of screws 25, which engage the prongs 15, adapted to enter the openings 14,

as will be apparent. In Fig. 11, I have shown still another form of molding D2, which may be employed if desired in connection with any of the forms of side members, such molding having inturned edges 16.

In Figs. 8 and 12, I have illustrated'a slightly different construction of side member and molding. The side member C4 has the bead 21 on one side somewhat higher than the bead 22 on the other side and the wire is stretched over the lower bead. The inside walls of the beads are formed with perforations similar to 14 in` Fig. 7, adapted to receive teeth 19 and 2,0, struck out from the special forrv of molding D3, shown in Fig. 12. This molding is folded back upon y itself at 17, and is provided with a lip 18, adapted to overlie the wire .E and bead 22,

as shown in Fig. 8.- Also, as illustrated in this figure, the tops of the molding, bead 21 and lip 18 are preferably all in one planelso as to present a ilat, smooth appearance. It will thus be seen that I have provided several slightly different methods of constructing the side members and molding, but all of them are characterized by the fact that the side members have rigid tubular portions adapted to be engaged by the arms of the corner pieces, and a resilient bottom which permits the molding to be forced into position and frictionally gripped or held in place.

What I claim is:

1. In a screen, a frame comprising solid metal corner pieces, 'channel shaped sheet metal side members secured thereto, said corner pieces having a portion adapted to fit within the channel of such members, Wire fabric stretched over said frame, and a wire holding molding also lying within said channel shaped side members.

2. In a screen, a frame comprising side members having a pair of spaced tubular portions, corner pieces having armsadapted to enter the ends of such tubular portions, and thus unite said side members and corner pieces, Wire fabric stretched over said frame, and means for holding said fabric in position.

3. In a screen, a frame comprising channel shaped side members having the edges of their flanges turned over so as to form tubular portions, corner pieces having spaced parallel arms adapted to enter the ends of such tubular portions, and thus hold the parts in assembled relation, wire fabric stretched over said frame, and means for holding said Wire in position.

4. In a screen, a frame comprising channel shaped side members having the edges of their flanges turned over so as to form tubular portions, corner pieces having arms adapted to enter the ends of such tubular portions, and having an intermediate portion adapted to lie in the channel between the tubular portions, wire fabric stretched over said frame, and a Wire holding molding disposed in said channel shaped side members. v

5. In a screen, a frame comprising solid metal corner pieces and channel shaped sheet metal side members secured thereto, said corner pieces having a portion adapted to t within the channel of such members, said portion gradually varying in thickness,

and terminating in a feather edge, Wire fabric stretched over said frame, and means for holding such fabric in position.

6. In a screen frame, a side member made of a strip of sheet metal having both edges folded up and over upon themselves to form a channel-shaped element with marginal beads or tubes, said beads being substantially rigid, and the bottom of such channel bein resilient, and a channel-shaped molding tting between the beads, and held by the resilience of the bottom of said channelshaped element.

7. In a screen frame, a side member made of a strip of sheet metal having its edges folded up and over upon themselves to form a channel-shaped element With marginall beads or tubes, said beads being substantially rigid, and the bottom of such channel being resilient, said channel being Wider at the bottom than at the top, and a molding adapted to fit Within said channel, and held in position by the resilience of the bottom of said channel-shaped element.

i 8. In a screen frame, the combination with a channel-shaped side member, 'of a molding adapted to fit therein, said channel-shaped member having perforations along its sides, and said molding having a series of prongs adapted to engage such perforations and thus lock the parts together.

In testimony whereof I have aiiixed my signature, in presence of two Witnesses.

EDWARD T. BURROWES. Witnesses:

IDA F. MCNAIRN, ALICE M. GURNEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2563730 *Oct 10, 1945Aug 7, 1951Raleigh R MartinStorm window structure
US2585471 *May 10, 1947Feb 12, 1952Harry J KammererWindow structure
US3062280 *Apr 11, 1958Nov 6, 1962Kellogg & BurgerShower curtain unit for bath alcoves
US3127926 *Oct 14, 1960Apr 7, 1964Carl W AdeltBuilding construction
US3162414 *Apr 17, 1962Dec 22, 1964Francis J MaschekBag holding device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification160/381, 160/398, 160/394, 160/397
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/52