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Publication numberUS1121137 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1914
Filing dateJun 9, 1904
Priority dateJun 9, 1904
Publication numberUS 1121137 A, US 1121137A, US-A-1121137, US1121137 A, US1121137A
InventorsWilliam H Schoonmaker
Original AssigneeWilliam H Schoonmaker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal-combustion engine.
US 1121137 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. H. SOHOONMAKER. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE APPLICATION FILED JUNE 0.1mm.

Patented Dec. 15. 1914.

2 SHBETSSHEET 1.

50 #1 MMLM/L ATTORNEYS W. H. SOHOONMAKER.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 9.1904

1,121,137. Patented Dec.15,1914.

| I II III H I' 24* wmvss /NVENT0R MW 1/ B) W W ATTOR/VE WILLIAM H. SGHOONILIAKER, OF MONTCLAIR, NEW JERSEY.

INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 115, 11914..

Application filed June 9, 1904.. Serial lfTo. 211,803.

1 b aZZ whom it may com-em Be it known that 1, WILLIAM H. Someonnannn, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Montclair, in the county of Essex and State of New Jersey, have invented a new and Improved Internal-Combustion Engine, of which the following is a full. clear, and exact description.

The invent-ion relates to an internal combustion engine intended particularly for use in connection with a liquid fuel, and it provides for the employment of a receiver carrying a certain quantity of fuel through which air is forced, thus forming a vapor which is kept stored at a certain pressure in the receiver, the vapor or mixture of air and fuel being conducted to the engine cylinder and burned in the usual manner.

T he invention also involves the use as an auxiliary, of an independent means for mixing the liquid fuel and air so that the fuel mixture may be retained by these devices independently of and, if desired, in addition to the means first described for supplying the mixture;

'1 he invention also involves a certain novel construction of the engine cylinderwhercby air is compressed on the out-stroke of the piston, this compressed air being used in the formation of the combustible mixture above referred to.

The invention involves various other features of major or minor importance, as will be fully set forth hereinafter.

Reference is had to the accompanying drawings forming part of this specification, in which drawings like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several views, and in which Figure 1 is a side elevation of the apparatus with parts in section; Fig. :2 is a plan View of the same; Fig. 3 is a sectional view showing the three-way cock used in connection with a gasolene pump; Fig. 4: is a detail section showing the three-way cock used in connection with the air and fuel mixture pipes to control the flow to the engine; Fig. 5 is a sectional view on the line 55 of Fig. 6. particularly illustrating the compressor feature of the invention; Fig. 6 is a section on the line P6 of Fig. 5; and Fig. 7 is a horizontal section on the line T'( of Fig. 5.

10 indicates the base or frame of the engine, on which are mounted the cylinders 11. While I have here illustrated three cylinders it will be apparent that the number is not material.

12 indicates the pistons, and 1% the connecting rod, both of which may be of any form desired. it the outer or lower end of the c lindcr is formed a case 15, in which is arranged a slide valve 16 adapted alternately to cover two ports 17 and 18. The slide valve is held in position by cleats 19 attached to the case 15, and overhanging the slide valve as shown. The slide valve is formed with a central opening 20, through which the connecting rod it passes, and around the rod is arranged a semi-spherical member 21, the rod sliding through this member and said member being arranged to roll freely in the cavity 20, the walls of which correspond to the semi-spherical formation of the member 21, which latter is provided with trunnions 22 rockably mounted in boxes 23 attached to the slide valve 16. With this arrangement, as the connecting rod 1% swings from side to side during the operation of the engine, a reciprocal movement is impart-ed to the slide valve 16, cans lug the ports '17 and 18 to be alternately uncox cred. On the up-strokc of the piston the port 18 is covered and the port 1? uncovered and atmospheric air will then be drawn into the lower part of the cylinder. lfpon the down stroke of the pistonthe port 17 will be covered and the port 18 uncovered, thus forcing the air out from the lower part of the cylinder through the port 18. This structure provides an effective means for compressing the air, and at the same time it allows a much higher compression to be attained by utilizing the upper side of the piston. Since the lower part of the cylinder alone forms the compression chamber, and the contents of this being much less than the contents of the lower part of the cylinder and the crank case, it follows that a much higher compression is attained than in the form of engine in which the air or mixture is compressed in a closed crank case.

As shown best in Figs. 1 and 2, a pipe 24 is provided with branches communicating respectively with the port 18. Said branches have check valves 25 to prevent the return of the pressure to the engine cylinders. From the pipe 2% a branch 26 passes to an automatic inlet valve "27. This valve' 27 controls communication between the inlet pipe 28 and the atmosphere. Said pipe 28 passes by means of branches, as shown, to,

the valve will be closed, thus cutting off the.

air supplied to the pumping end of the cylinder or cylinders 11, and stopping the generation of'further pressure in the pipe 24 and its connections. When, however, this pressure drops below the predetermined point, the valve 27 opens and compression is renewed. The pipe 24 is provided with a check valve 29. on the opposite sides of whichare located pipes 30 and 31 both communicating with the pipe 24. Said pipe 24 continues into the receiver 32. the end of the pipe within the receiver being perforated as indicated at 33, whereby to finally dividethe air passing from the pipe. 34 indicates the gasolene or other liquid fluid pump, which is driven from the crank shaft 35 of the engine. Said pump communicates by a pipe 36 with the gasolene -tank 37. interposed in the pipe 36 is a three-way valve 38, which is so arran ed that upon the movement of the plug ot the valve the pump 34 will be placed in communication either with the gasolene tank 37 or the atmosphere, the latter through a connection so 39. This valve 38 is actuated by the hei ht of the gasolene within the receiver 32, t is being efiected through a connection 40 with a float located in a float case 41. Said pipe is in connection with the receiver 32 by a pipe 42 and with the pipe 24 by means of a branch 43.

Gasolene is supplied to the pipe 24 at the side of thecheck valve 29 adjacent to the receiver 32,:2s'nd consequently to the receiver, through the' pipe 31 which connects with the pump 3- by means of a branch 44. By this arrangement a certain bodyof gasolencfwill be maintained in the bottom of the receiver 32, and a current or currents of air will be forced continually through the pipe 24 into the receiver, thus carbureting the air. The vapor thus formed will be retained in the up er part of the receiver 32, and is drawn oi? from 'the same by means of a pipe 45 passing to the inlet port of the cylinder or cylinders as will be herein-. after explained. The vapor or explosive niixturepipe communicates with a pipe.

46 forming a continuationthereof, and leading to the inlet ports of the several cylinders of the en 'ne. This pipe 46 is provided with a thrott e 4:? by means of which the 7 engine may be controlled, and the pipe 46 is also provided with a three-way valve 48 as best shown in Fig. 4. Said valve communicates with the pipe 45 and with the pipe 30 leading from the pipe 24. By means of this valve the air pipe 30 may be cut of? completely, and the pi e 46 opened to full communication with t e mixture pipe 45, or the mixture pipe may be cut ed and v the air pipe 0 ened, as desired. From the pipe 4-4 a gaso ene pipe 49. passes,'this p pe extending to a casing 50 in communicatlon with thepipe 46 and containing a needle valve 51. These devices enable me to operate/the engine wholl from' the mixture derived through the pipe 45, the air. pipe 30 being cut ofi and the needle -valve5 l being in closed. position. If, however, it is desired for any reasonto vaporize the gasolcnc directly in the pipe 46,this'may be done by throwing the valve 48 to close the pipe -15, and open the airpipe 30, this pipe opening into the three-way valve 48. The air passing through the pipe 46 will atomize the gasolene passing the valve 51 and form an explosive mixture which may be conducted to the cylinders and compressed and burned inthe usual manner.

.32 indicates a gage for determining pressure. in the pipe 45 and receiver -32, and 53 indicates a nipple and valve adapted to be placed in communication with a .hand pump whereby the system may be primarily charged with air upon starting the engine.

From the foregoing explanation the manner of operating and using the engine will be apparent to skilled engineers.

Various changes in the form, proportions and minor details of my invention may be resorted to at will without departing from the spirit and scope thereof; hence I consider myselfentitled to all such variations as may lie within the terms of my claims.

Having thus described iny invention I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent: p 1. An internal combustion engine comprising a cylinder and piston and air compressor, a liquid fuel reservoir, a connection between said reservoir and the compressor, a connection between the reservoir and the engine cylinder, a three-We valve'in the last-named connection, an an pipe leading to the said 'valve, a valve controlled inlet into the last named connection adjacent to the three-way valve, and means for leading txllije liquid fuel to the said valve controlled i et. a

prising. a cylinder and piston and an air compressor, a liquid fuel reservoir, a connection between the compressor and the fuel reservoir, and a connection between the fuel reservoir and the cylinder, a three-way valve in the last named connection, an air pipe leading to said valve from the compressor, a valve controlled inlet into the last named connection adjacent to the three-wa valve, and a liquid fuel pipe leadin to said valve controlled inlet from the fue source.

3. An internal combustion engine comprising a cylinder and piston and an air compressor, a. fuel reservoir and means es- 1315 2. An internal combustion engine coInv and the admission tablishingcommunication between the compressor and the fuel reservoir, means establishing communication between the fuel reservoir and the engine cylinder, a fuel pump, a valve controlling the supply to said pump, and a float actuated by the height of the liquid fuel in the reservoir, said float operating said valve, a connection between the pump and the fuel reservoir, a connection between the pump and the communication between the fuel reservoir and engine cylinder, a three-way valve in said com munication between the said reservoir and engine cylinder, and a connection between the compressor and the three-way valve.

4. The combination with an internal coinbustion engine of a liquid fuel chamber, a source of compressed air, means for leading the compressed air to the liquid fuel chamber, whereby to maintain in the chamber a constant supply of fuel-vapor under pressure, means establishing communication between saidchamber and the admission port of the engine, and controllable air and liq uid fuel supplies leading into said communication between the liquid fuel chamber ort, whereby to, adjust the proportions of t e combustible mixture.

The combination with an internal combustion engine, of means for generating and maintaining a supply of explosive mixture under ressure of a quantity greater than a singl e charge of the engine, means establishin communication between said supply an the admission port of the engine, and means for supplying liquid fuel directly to said communication means.

'6. The. combination with an internal combustionengine of means for generating and maintaining a supply of combustible mixture under pressure of a quantity greater than a single charge of the engine, and means for establishing communication between said supply and the admission port of the engine, and controllable air and fuel supplies leading to said communication, whereby to permit of the adjustment of the proportions of the mixture.

'7, The combination with a two 0 cle internalcombustion en ine of means or generating and constanty maintaining a body of combustible mixture under ressure and of a quantity greater'than a single charge of the engine, means establishing communication between said body and the admission port of the engine, and controllable air and fuel supplies leading into said communication, whereby to admit of adjusting the proportions of said mixture on its way to the admission port.

8. The combination with an internalcombustion engine, of means for forming and maintaining a body of combustible mixture of air and fuel under pressure, means for conducting portions thereof to the admission port ofthe engine controllable means for supplying h drocarbon to such mixture on its way to t e engine, and controllable means for supplying air to' such mixture, whereby to regulate the quality of such mixture.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name-to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

WILLIAM H. SCHOONMAKER.

Witnesses:

Isaac B. Owens, J x0. M. Rrrran.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3677529 *Jan 17, 1968Jul 18, 1972Mary Zane JohnsonLiquid fuel and air mixture charge forming device
US3999526 *Nov 18, 1975Dec 28, 1976Asfar Khaled RVaporizing carburetor
US4007721 *May 17, 1974Feb 15, 1977Teledyne Industries, Inc.Fuel metering apparatus for a carburetor
US4074666 *Sep 17, 1975Feb 21, 1978Pierce Sherman LCarburetion system for an internal combustion engine
USRE30622 *Apr 17, 1978May 26, 1981Teledyne Industries, Inc.Fuel metering apparatus for a carburetor
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/559.1, 123/59.7, 123/74.00D, 261/DIG.510, 123/522
Cooperative ClassificationF02B39/04, Y10S261/51