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Publication numberUS1122972 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1914
Filing dateJan 31, 1914
Priority dateJan 31, 1914
Publication numberUS 1122972 A, US 1122972A, US-A-1122972, US1122972 A, US1122972A
InventorsEdward Maye
Original AssigneeEdward Maye
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Revolving internal-combustion engine.
US 1122972 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I 5'. MAYE; -R 'BVOLVING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

- APPLICATION FILED JAN.31, 1914. I r v Patented De0.29,1914.

2 SHEETS'SHEET l.

I REVOLVING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

ABPLIOATIUN rum; 1411.31, 1914'. l 122372. Patanted Bea-29,1914.

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ATENT oF -f- EDWARD MAYE, or annulus, AaKansAs.

REVOLVING INTERNALCOMBUSTION ENGINE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

. Application filed January 31, 1914. Serial No. 815,787.

I To all whom it'may concern: Be it known that I, EDWARD. MAYE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Barling, in the county of Sebastian and State sof Arkansas, have invented new and useful Improvements in Revolving Internal Combustion Engines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates-to internal combustion engines of the revolving or rotating type in which the cylinders of the" engine are arranged in an annular series'and rotatable around a common axis, the object of the invention being to produce a simple,re- '15 liable and economically manufactured .en-

With the above and other objects in view theQinvention consists in the novel constriiction, combination and arrangement of parts, as will hereinafter be more fully de; scribed, illustrated and claimed. In the accompanying drawings :Figure 1 is a longitudinal section through an engine embodying the present "through the same taken in line with the shaft. Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail section through the gas conducting rings. Fig. 4

is a detail face view of one of the stationary disks showing the cam groove therein. Rig.

5 is a detail perspective view of one of,the slides or links. 7

Referring to the drawings 1 designates a series of revolving cylinders or, in other words, a circular series of cylinders .ar-

' ranged radially with respect to each other and revolving bodily around -acommon center in which the engine shaft 2 is lo- Connecting all thie cylinders is a rotating ring 3 which revolves around a stationary .fringi, the ring 3 being formed with an an- V inulargas channel 5 from which tubular connections 6 extend to'the several cylin-' ders 1, there being a connection 6 for each of said cylin'ders. The stationary ring 4 is likewise formed at two places with channels 7 and 8, the channel 7 forming, for example, an intake gas chamber and-the 'channel 8 forming an exhaust chamber. g f I .One of the rings, for example the ring 4:, is provided in the .face which contacts with the ring 3 with annular grooves 9 arranged at opposite sides of the channels 5 and 7 and insaid grooves 9 are arranged acking rings or strips which form a gas-tight joint between the stationary ring and the r0- tating ring. 10 designates an intake. pipe leading from a suitable carbureter 11, and 1 2- designates an exhaust pipe, the intake pipe 10 communicating with the intake chamber 7 and the exhaust pipe 12 communicating with the exhaust chamber 8.

'Pistons, l3 are-mounted to reciprocatefin the cylinders 1 and connecting rods 14.- of

said cylinders are pivotally attached at15 to a corresponding number of runners 16, the said runners being pivotally connected .at 17 to the oppositely located heads or casing plates 18 which partially. inclosethe cylinders and revolve therewith.

Arranged centrally of the motor is an tionary and around which-the runnerslG travel in contact. At opposite sides of the invention, 5" 30 taken at right angles to the engine shaft;

Fig. 2 is a vertical-transverse section.

eccentric 19 are stationary disks-20 each of PatentedDec.29,1 914a .elliptical cam or eccentric 19 which is sta- 5 which is provided with a cam groove 21 corresponding to the general shape ofthe eccentric 19. .Each of the runners 16 is,85

provided with studs 22 which ,work in the cam grooves 21 and serve to insure the runner's following their proper path andworking in sliding contact. with the stationary eccentric 19, the runners 16 being preferably curved from end to end as shown in riphery of the eccentric 19.

By reference to Fig. 1 it will be observed that when an explosion takes place in a cyl-" inder, the piston rod in traveling toward the center of the engine thrusts against the JF-ig. 4 so that they will follow the peother, continuous rotary motion is thus parted to the series of cylinders, the casing which partly incloses said cylinders and therevolving ring f3. The iiitak'e...and ,cxe'

', haust chambers of the stationary ring are so situated as to admit of explosive mixture successively to the cylinders as they pass the same and the exhaust from the same is successively and periodically released into the exhaust chamber Bypassing therefrom through the exhaust pipe 12. The shaft 2 passes through the eccentric 19 and also through a suitable supporting base 23. to which said eccentric is fastened and said shaft is also fastened'to the casing of the engine so that the rotary movement of the casing is transmitted to said shaft.

The engine hereinabov'e described is of very simple construction, dispensing with the usual crank shaft at present in use in the Gnome engine and others of a similar type and also dispensing with the usual valves. Thiscorrespondingly reduces the liability of the engine getting out of order and particularly adapts it for aeronautical uses. The enginealso dispenses with the necessity of using gear vvheels of any kind and by reason ofthe construction shown and described, the engine may be easily-taken down and reassembled in a comparatively short period of time. By using the eccentric 19 in place of the ordinary crank shaft, four complete piston strokes are obtained in each cycle of operation thereby obtaining an explosion and impulse in each cylinder for each complete rotation of the engine.

lVhat I claim is 1. An internal combustion engine comprising a stationary supporting base, a circular series of cylinders all revolving around a common" center and having their longitudinal axes radial to the engine shaft, a non-rotating eccentric located centrally of said series of cylinders, pistons movable radially to the engine shaft and mounted for reciprocatory movement in'said cylinders, inwardly extending connecting rods for said pistons, and runners located between the inner ends of said cylinders and traveling around in sliding contact with said eccentric, each runner bingpivotally connected at one point to one of said connecting rods and pivotally connected at another point with said series of cylinders. 3

2. An internal combustion engine comprising a stationary supporting basella circular series of cylinders all -revolving around a common center and'hav ng their a central casing revolving with said cylin-yders, a non-rotating eccentric located ceIi-' longitudinal axes radial to the engine shaft,

" trally of said seriesof cylinders, pistons movable radially to the engine shaft and" mounted for reciproeatory movement 1n said cylinders, inwardly extending connect ing rods for said pistons, andrunners located between the inner ends of said cylin= ders -and traveling illOllUfl-H-r'fiiffiilTIQ con- 3. An internal combustion engine com-' prising a stationary supporting base, a circular series of cylinders all revolving around a common center and having their longitudinal axes radial to the engine shaft,

-a non-rotating eccentric located centrally of said series of cylinders, pistons movable radially to the engine shaft and mounted for reciprocatory movement in. said cylinders, inwardly extending connecting rods for said pistons, runners located between the inner ends of said cylinders and traveling around in sliding contact with said eccentrio, each runner being pivotally connected at one point to one of said connecting rods and pivotally connected at another point With said series of cylinders, and an annular gas conduit consisting of' two concentric sections one of which is carried by said cylinders and the other stationary, both of said sections having channeled meeting faces, the revolvingsection communicating with the cylinders and the stationary section embodying intake and exhaust chambers. I V

4. An internal combustion engine comprising a stationary supporting base, a cir-- cular series of cylinders all revolving around a common center and having their longitudinal axes radial to the engine shaft, a non-rotatingeccentric located centrally of said series of cylinders, pistonsv movable radially to the engine shaft and mounted for reciprocatory movement in said cylinders, inwardly extending connecting rods for said pistons, runners'located between the inner ends of said cylinders and traveling around in sliding contact with said eccentric, each runner being pivotally connected at one point to one of said connecting rods and pivotally connected at another point with said series of cylinders, an annular gas conduit consisting of two concentric sections one of, which is carried by said cylinders and the other stationary, both of said sections having channeled meeting faces, the revolving section communicating with the cylinvdersand the stationary section embodying intake =and exhaust chambers, and packing strips interposed between said meeting faces.

An internal combustion engine comprising a'stationary supporting base, a circular series of cylinders all revolving around a common center and having their longitudinal axes radial to theengineshaft,

a non-rotating eccentric located centrally of said series of' cylinders, pistons movable radially to the engine shaft andmounted tor "-reciproca tory movement in said cylinders,

inwardly extending connecting rodsfor said pistons, runners located between the inner ends of said cylinders and traveling around in 'sliding coi1tact.with said eccentric, each runner being pivotally connected at one point to one of said connecting rods and pivotally connected at anothenpoint with said series of cylinders, oppositely arranged stationary disks formed with eccentric grooves, and studs on said runners Working in said grooves.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses. EDWARD MAYE,

' Witnesses:

J. H. GRIFFITH, V

DONA V. HACKLERQ

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2720843 *Feb 4, 1952Oct 18, 1955Fred MiddlestadtHydraulic drive
US3179016 *Aug 3, 1961Apr 20, 1965Trump Engineers LtdHydraulic wheel
US4381740 *May 5, 1980May 3, 1983Crocker Alfred JReciprocating engine
US4387672 *Oct 8, 1981Jun 14, 1983Crocker Alfred JEnergy transfer apparatus
US4653438 *Feb 14, 1986Mar 31, 1987Russell Robert LRotary engine
US4974553 *Feb 12, 1990Dec 4, 1990Jerome L. MurrayRotary internal combustion engine
US5090372 *Jun 26, 1991Feb 25, 1992Jerome L. MurrayRotary internal combustion engine
US5211138 *Mar 20, 1992May 18, 1993Jerome L. MurrayRotary internal combustion engine
US5228294 *Apr 10, 1992Jul 20, 1993Murray Jerome LRotary internal combustion engine
US5343832 *Nov 16, 1992Sep 6, 1994Murray United Development CorporationCombination rotary internal combustion engine and ducted fan
US8087487Nov 12, 2008Jan 3, 2012Rez MustafaHybrid turbo transmission
US8191517Sep 25, 2008Jun 5, 2012Rez MustafaInternal combustion engine with dual-chamber cylinder
US8235150Jun 9, 2009Aug 7, 2012Rez MustafaPneumatic hybrid turbo transmission
US8336304Nov 23, 2009Dec 25, 2012Rez MustafaHydraulic hybrid turbo-transmission
US8490584Apr 8, 2010Jul 23, 2013Rez MustafaAir hybrid engine with dual chamber cylinder
US8622032May 15, 2012Jan 7, 2014Mustafa RezInternal combustion engine with dual-chamber cylinder
US9074527 *Jan 3, 2011Jul 7, 2015Del WolvertonCounterpoise engine
US9080498Nov 26, 2013Jul 14, 2015Mustafa RezCombustion engine with a pair of one-way clutches used as a rotary shaft
US20080121196 *Dec 22, 2005May 29, 2008Luciano FantuzziInternal-Combustion Engine With Guided Roller Piston Drive
US20090313984 *Apr 9, 2009Dec 24, 2009Rez MustafaHydraulic hybrid turbo transmission
US20090313990 *Dec 24, 2009Rez MustafaPneumatic hybrid turbo transmission
US20100064675 *Nov 23, 2009Mar 18, 2010Rez MustafaHydraulic hybrid turbo-transmission
US20100071640 *Sep 25, 2008Mar 25, 2010Rez MustafaInternal combustion engine with dual-chamber cylinder
US20100116578 *Nov 12, 2008May 13, 2010Rez MustafaHybrid turbo transmission
US20100192878 *Aug 5, 2010Rez MustafaAir hybrid engine with dual chamber cylinder
US20110162599 *Jul 7, 2011Del WolvertonCounterpoise engine
EP2032801A1 *Dec 21, 2005Mar 11, 2009Dezmotec AGRotary piston engine
WO1990006424A1 *Nov 15, 1989Jun 14, 1990Jerome L MurrayRotary internal combustion engine
WO2004085813A1 *Mar 26, 2003Oct 7, 2004Mones JaafarInternal combustion engine with hydraulic transmission and valveless distribution, which is supplied by an oxygen generator
WO2006067205A1 *Dec 22, 2005Jun 29, 2006Key Partner Holding S AInternal- combustion engine with guided roller piston drive
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/44.00E, 91/496, 123/44.00R, 92/66
International ClassificationF02B57/08, F02B75/18
Cooperative ClassificationF02B2075/1816, F01B2009/065, F02B57/08
European ClassificationF02B57/08