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Publication numberUS1124001 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1915
Filing dateOct 9, 1913
Priority dateOct 9, 1913
Publication numberUS 1124001 A, US 1124001A, US-A-1124001, US1124001 A, US1124001A
InventorsEdgar P Elzey
Original AssigneeEdgar P Elzey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roofing-tile and the like.
US 1124001 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. P. ELZEY.

ROOFING TILE AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED 001*. 9, 1913 Patented Jan. 5, 1915.

E. P. BLZEY.

ROOFING TILE AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED OCT. 9, 1913.

Patented Jan. 5, 1915. l

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E P. ELZBY. v ROOFING TILE AND THE LIKE. APPLICATION FILED OUT. 9, 1913.

Patented Jan. 5, 1915.

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EDGAR P. ELZEY, OF PARKEBSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA.

ROOFING-TILE AND THE LIKE.

Application filed October 9, 1913.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, EDGAR P. ELZEY, a citizen of the United States, residing at Parkersburg, in the county of 'Wood and State of lVest Virginia, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Roofing-Tiles and the like, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to certain improvements in roofing tiles and the like; and the objects and nature of the invention will be readily understood by those skilled in the art in the light of the following explanation of the accompanying drawings illustrating what I now believeto be the preferred embodiments from among other formations, constructions and arrangements within the spirit and scope of my invention.

An object of the invention is to provide certain improvements in the structure of clay or other material tiles and the like, whereby a single tile or integral body will present the appearance of several separate units or tiles, and yet can be readily cut or separated into separate units, with certain resulting advantages to the manufacturer and user.

A further object of the invention is to provide tiles and the like with improved means for the drainage of water from overlapping portions of the tiles and to prevent the leakage of water and snow through the joints between the tiles.

A further object of the invention is to provide tiles and the like with improved means to reduce to the minimum the liability of snow and water being driven upwardly between the overlapping portions of the tiles of adjacent courses.

A further object of the invention is to provide certain improvements in formation and in details of construction whereby a highly satisfactory tile and the like, will be produced overcoming certain defects incidental to the construction of clay and the like tiles now in use.

The invention consists in certain novel features in construction and in matters of formation as more fully and particularly set forth and specified hereinafter.

Referring to the accompanying drawings: Figure l, is a top plan showing portions of two courses of superimposed tiles of my invention. Fig. 2, is a plan view of the under or bottom faces of portions of several interlocked tiles of a course. Fig. 3, is a vertical Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Jan. 5, 1915.

Serial No. 794,272.

or longitudinal section through several tiles of adjacent courses. Fig. 4, is a top plan of portions of two interlocked tiles of a course. Fig. 5, is a cross section taken in the plane of the line 5--5, Fig. 4.

In the drawings, I illustrate my inven tion applied to approximately flat and rectangular tiles or shingle-tiles pressed from clay, or like material, by suitable dies, and then suitably fired or burned to approximately the desired degree of hardness.

The body 1, of the tile is of a generally flat formation at the portion of its top surface that is intended to be exposed. The lower end of the tile is formed with an imperforate depending flange 2, extending throughout the width of the flat top face of the tile. This flange 2, forms the butt or lower closed end of the tile; that is, the portion of the lower end or edge of the tile that is adapted to be exposed. This depending butt flange 2, is straight and of uniform vertical depth throughout its length, in the particular example illustrated, although I do not wish to so limit all features of my invention. In the particular example illustrated, the tile approximately throughout the length of the edge of its upper end or head, is formed with a depending straight flange 3. The under surface of the tile is formed with a number of spaced parallel depending ribs 4, each extending throughout the length of the tile from the butt flange 2, to the head flange 3. The lower edges of the flange 3, and ribs 4, are adapted to form the bearing faces of the tile against the roof or other support to which the tile is secured.

At the under side of the lower or butt end portion of the tile, 1 provide a depending flange or rib 5, spaced inwardly or upwardly a distance from but parallel with the butt flange 2, and joining the lower end portions of the several ribs 4. This flange 5, traverses and depends below the lower longitudinal edges of the several ribs 4, so that its vertical depth exceeds that of said ribs. However, the vertical depth of said flange 5, is less than that of the butt flange 2.

The corner portions of the head or upper end of the tile are formed with nail holes 6, for the passage of the nails by which the tile is secured to the roof, and I prefer to form elevated bosses 7, on the top surface of the tile through which said holes are punched.

The lower or butt ends of the tiles are arranged over and rest on the heads or upper ends of the tiles of the next course below, and the upper faces of the heads of the tiles are formed to cooperate with the flanges of the butt ends of the superimposed tiles in providing wind or weather breaks against the passage of water, snow and dust between the tiles and to the roof surface covered by the tiles. To this end I provide the outer or top face of the head of the tile with a pair of parallel ribs, elevations, breaks, or dams 8, arranged transversely of and across the tile and approximately parallel with the butt flange 2, of the tile. 1 also provide the top. or head edge of the tile throughout its length with a darn, rib or elevation 9. The rib or flange 9, is preferably parallel with the ribs 8, and is spaced a distance therefrom, thereby providing a basin or depression intervening between flange 9, and the ribs 8, to trap water, snow and dust, While the flange 9, serves to prevent the passage of water from said depression over the top edge of the tile to the roof surface. The transverse ribs or elevations 8, 9, can be connected by several ribs or elevations 10, 11, arranged longitudinally of the tile to form end walls of the depression between ribs 8, 9. The ribs 10, are arranged at the side edges of the tile to preventfiow of water from said depression and over the side edges of the tile, While the elevation 11, joins intermediate portions of the ribs 8, 9, and traverses an intermediate portion of said depression. In the example illustrated, the intermediate longitudinal elevation 11, is arranged ap proximately along the longitudinal center of the tile and is of excessive width with respect to the elevations 10, as will more fully appear hereinafter. The two ribs 8, are adjacent to each other and are separated by an intervening drainage channel or gutter 12, traversed by the walls or elevations 1O, 11. In the example illustrated, this gutter is V-shaped in cross section and the ribs 8, are formed with transverse drainage openings or passages 13, to said gutter from the said depression and from said gutter to the top surface of the tile downwardly beyond said ribs. The drainage openings in one rib are arranged out of alinement with the drainage openings in the other rib. The top face of the tile is, in the example illustrated, formed with several elevations i l, forming stops rising from the surface of the tile downwardly from or below the lowermost rib 8.

The butt ends of the tiles of an upper course overlap the heads of the tiles of the next course below with the butt flanges 52, of said upper course resting on the top surfaces of the tiles of the lower course downwardly below or beyond the ribs 8, of the said lower course tiles and held spaced a distance therefrom by the stops 14, and with the under edges of the ribs 5, of said upper course tiles approximately abutting the top edges of ribs 8, of the under tiles. The butt flanges resting on the tiles below form a joint or wind and weather break against flanges. If rain and snow should be driven past the r1bs 8, the depressions between said ribs and the head flanges 9, will tend to trap the same, and said head flanges 9, will serve to prevent flow of water over the top edge of the tiles to the'inner roof surface. The passages 13, and gutters l2, permit the free drainage of water from said depressions and from the spaces below the butt ends of the upper tiles to prevent the water overflowing the flanges 9, to the inner roof surface. The stops ll, limit the upward adjustment of the upper course tiles on the lower course tiles, to prevent the butt flanges 2, be ing brought into engagement with the ribs 8. It is desirable to leave free drainage spaces along the top surfaces of the lower tiles between the butt flanges 2, of the upper tiles and the ribs 8, of the lower tiles particularly to prevent the butt flanges freezing to the ribs 8 and choking the drainage passages.

By providing each tile head with several parallel ribs or elevations 8, to cooperate with the inner weather break or flange 5, of the butt of an upper tile, longitudinal adjustment of the upper tiles on the lower tiles is possible without destroying the weather excluding functions of the ribs 8 and flanges 5. The flanges 5, can register with either the upper or the lowermost ribs 8, or the gutters between them and yet cooperate therewith to form a weather break.

The tile is suitably formed at its side edges to interlock with similar tiles in the same course, forming approximately water tight joints between the tiles. To attain this result, one side edge of the tile is formed with a depressed laterally projecting 1ongitudinal shelf 16, at its lower end terminating short of the butt flange of the tile whereby the lower left hand corner of the tile (in top plan), is formed with a notch 17. The upper end of this shelf is closed by a vertical transverse wall 18. The top face of this shelf is longitudinally depressed or channeled to form a longitudinal drainage trough or channel 19, between the flat side edge 20 of the tile and the elevated outer edge portion, tongue or rib 21, of the shelf. The portion of the top face of the shelf, between the bottom of trough 19, and the elevated edge or tongue 21, is formed with a longitudinal depressed step or shoulder 22, to provide vertical longitudinal edge Walls or a stepped formation between the bottom of the trough 19, and the top edge of the tongue. The under surface of the opposite side edge portion of the body of the tile, is formed to correspond to and seat down on the top surface of shelf 16, of the next tile of the course. The side edge 20", of the tile corresponds to the opposite tile edge 20, and is adapted to abut the edge 20, of the next tile. The depending longitudinal tongue 21 of the underside of the tile body corresponds to and is adapted to fit down in the trough 19, of the next tile, While the step-like longi tudinal formation 22, of the under side of the tile body corresponds to the formation 21, 22 of the shelf and is adapted to receive the same (see Fig. 5). The tongues 21 and 21*, are formed narrow with respect to the longitudinal depressions receiving the same to permit limited lateral adjustment of the tiles of a course while being laid without detracting from the capacity of the side joints between the tiles to drain off water and exclude the same from the inner surface of the roof. The troughs of the shelves will catch the water driven down between the edges 20, 20 of the tiles and discharge the same over the lower ends of the shelves onto the top surfaces of the heads of the course of tiles below, while the tongues 21, 21, and intervening engaging stepped portions are designed to prevent water and snow being driven transversely from the tongues and shelves to the inner surface of the roof. These tongues and stepped surfaces form double wind and water breaks.

The upper right hand corner of the tile (in top plan) is formed with a notch 2 1, to receive the vertical transverse wall 18, of the next tile of the course, and this notch 24 is located at the upper or head end of the side edge portion of the tile formed with tongue and stepped portions 21 22. The opposite or butt end of said side edge portion terminates at the inner side surface of the right hand end (in top plan} of the butt flange or closed end 2, of the tile. This right hand end portion of a tile enters the notch 17 of the next tile of a course to prevent a break in the continuity of the tile butts or closed ends of the course and to conceal the front end of the side shelf of said next tile so that the water drains from the lower end of said shelf onto the top surface of the tile below and immediately behind said portion of the butt flange. The tiles of a course transversely overlap or interlock at their heads and butts, inasmuch as the transverse wall 18, of each tile extends into the notch 2 1 of the next tile and hence limits relative upward longitudinal movement of said next .tile; While the right hand end of the butt flange 2 ofeach tile extends into the notch 17 of the next tile and hence limits relative downward longitudinal movement of said next tile. These features are of advantage and utility in laying and lining up the tiles.

I show a tile of the standard or ordinary length, but of extra width, for instance, each tile is in width equal to two standard or ordinary tiles, but the desired artistic effect or design of many roofs would be spoiled should such extra width tiles be employed without means to conceal the real proportions of such tiles. However, the number of such extra width tiles to cover a given roof area can be manufactured and laid far more economically than the ordinary width tiles needed to cover the same area, without considering the advantage in the reduced number of joints and locks between tiles in a given area covered by the large tiles, and the reduced number of securing nails required.

I overcome the artistic objection to the large or extra size tile, by providing each large tile with means to imitate the joints between tiles of standard or ordinary size so that the roof covered by the tiles of my invention will appear as though covered by tiles of standard size. In the example illus trated, I attain this result by pressing a groove a, in the top face of each tile, extending longitudinally thereof from the head to the butt of the tile and continued across the closed end or butt flange of the tile and arranged approximately midway between the side edges of the tile, so as to give the one tile the appearance of two adjacent units or standard size tiles and the intervening side lock or joint between such two units. Furthermore, this groove a, is of such depth and formation as not only to imitate the side joint between two tiles or units, but also to form and constitute a drainage gutter, as well as a separation or cutting line whereby the one tile can be readily separated into two individually complete tiles or units. Such standard size tiles or units are required in finishing certain portions of the work where my full size tiles are employed for roof coverings. I usually arrange the groove a, over and in the plane of an extra wide rib L as indicated by dotted line Fig. so that the tile when separated into the two unit forming sections, will separate midway the width of such rib. I also continue said groove a, across the top face of the head of the tile longitudinally of the elevation 11, and midway the side edges thereof, whereby when said tile is separated into sections each section will have the water and snow trapping depression on the upper face of its head closed at the ends by elevations 10 and 11, allowing each unit so made to form half tiles of right and left hand, respectively, with necessary side grooves or locks therefor. Each large size tile is pressed with four bosses 7, two for each possible section thereof, but only the two bosses at the corners of the tile have the r nail holes 6, punched therein, so that but two nails will be required to secure the tile. However, should the large tile be separated, out or parted preferably, while green, to provide the two units or ordinary size tiles, holes 6, can be punched through the sec tions at the remaining bosses 7, to provide each unit with nail holes at both upper corners completing such half tiles.

It is evident that various changes, modifications and variations might be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention and hence I do not wish to limit myself to the exact disclosures hereof nor in fact to the inclusion of all the various features of my invention in one tile or series of tiles.

What I claim is;

1. A roofing tile having a flat exposed top surface, and a depending butt flange throughout the length. of its lower end said flange having a straight lower edge, the under side of the butt end of said tile having a straight-bottom-edge-depending guard flange parallel with, spaced from and vertically shorter than said butt flange, the upper side of the head of said tile formed with a straigl1t-top-edge transverse elevation ex tending thereacross and spaced from the top edge of the tile, the side and top edge portions of the tile above said elevation formed with guard flanges, said transverse elevation formed with an intermediate longitudinal drainage gutter and with transverse drainage passages arranged out of line and extending to said gutter from the flat top surface of the tile above said elevation and from said gutter to the flat surface of the tile below said elevation, the top face of the tile having a butt-flange stop rising therei from downwardly from said elevation, the

butt flange of a superimposed tile adapted to rest on the flat top face of the under tile below its said stop with its guard flange engaging the top edge of said elevation .above or below said gutter, substantially as described.

2. A roofing tile at its lower end having a depending transverse butt flange, said tile having one longitudinal edge portion formed with a laterally-projecting depressed longitudinal shelf and a vertical longitudinal flat edge 20 above said shelf, the top face of said shelf formed along its inner portion with a longitudinal drainage trough the inner wall of which is formed by said edge 20 and along its outer portion with a longitudinal rib 21, and with a longitudinal depressed step 22, between said rib and the bottom of said trough, said shelf terminating at its lower end short of the plane of said butt flange and at its upper end having a transverse elevated wall, the opposite longitudinal portion of said tile being notched at its upper end and having a vertical longitudinal flat edge 20, and at its under surface approximately from said notch to said butt flange longitudinally formed with a trough, rib, and step approximately corresponding to said formation of the top face of the shelf.

3. A roofing tile at its lower end having a depending transverse butt flange and at its under side having spaced parallel depending longitudinal ribs extending to said butt flange, one of said ribs located approximately midway the width of the tile being of double thickness the top face of said tile having a longitudinal groove extending throughout the length of the tile and arranged directly over said double thickness rib, the top surface of the head of said tile formed with complete snow and water traps at both sides of said groove.

l. A roofing tile having a depending butt flange and a depending guard flange parallel. with, spaced from, and vertically shorter than said butt flange, the upper side of the head of said tile formed with a transverse elevation having an intermediate longitudinal drainage gutter and with transverse drainage passages arranged out of line and extending to said gutter from the top surface of the tile above said elevation and from said gutter to the surface of the tile below said elevation, the top face of the tile having a butt-flange stop rising therefrom downwardly from said elevation. the butt flange of a superimposed tile adapted to rest on the flat top surface of the under tile below its said stop with its guard flange engaging the top edge of said elevation above or below said gutter without interlocking therewith, substantially as described.

A roofing tile having the top surface of its head of the tile surrounded by longitudinal and upper and lower transverse elevations to form a water and snow trap, the lower transverse elevation having drainage passages from said inclosed top surface to the main top surface below, said tile having a butt flange stop below said lower transverse elevation, said tile having a depending butt flange to rest on the flat surface of an under tile and below said stop thereof and also having a depending transverse guard flange spaced from and vertically shorter than the butt flange and having its lower edge arranged to rest 011 the top edge of said lower elevation, substantially as described.

6. A roofing tile at its lower end having a depending transverse butt flange and a depending guard flange spaced from said butt flange, the top face of said tile having a longitudinal groove extending throughout the length of the tile and approximately midway between and parallel with the opposite side edges of the tile, the top surface of the head of said tile formed with complete snow and water traps at both sides of said groove, substantially as described.

7. A roofing tile having a depending butt flange across its lower end, the under side of the butt end of said tile having a depending guard flange vertically shorter than the butt flange and having a fiat lower edge, the upper side of the head of the tile having an elevation extending across the tile a distance below the upper end of the tile and having a flat top edge and an intermediate longitudinal drainage gutter and transverse drainage passages extending from the upper top surface of the tile to said gutter and from said gutter to the top surface of the tile below said elevation, the flat top edge of said elevation being approximately at least twice the width of the flat bottom edge of said guard flange, the butt flange of a superimposed tile adapted to rest on the top surface of the under tile with the fiat bottom edge of its guard flange engaging either portion of said flat top edge of said elevation above or below said gutter, said tile having an elevated stop below said elevation to engage the butt flange of the superimposed tile and limit the upward adjustment of said superimposed tile on the lower tile to prevent the butt flange engaging the elevation, and permitting adjustment of said tiles to bring the lower edge of said guard flange into approximate engagement with the portion of the elevation above the gutter or with the portion of the elevation below the gutter.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

EDGAR P. ELZEY.

Witnesses:

E. S. Moons, K. Snooormss.

Qopies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

' Washington, D. 0.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2899716 *Jun 29, 1956Aug 18, 1959 Woodward
US3579940 *Jun 13, 1969May 25, 1971Stepan Chemical CoRoofing tile
US4514947 *May 18, 1983May 7, 1985Embelton-Grail, Inc.Roof tile and tile composition of matter
US4731969 *Sep 12, 1985Mar 22, 1988Redland Roof Tiles LimitedRoof tiles
US7596919 *Oct 18, 2003Oct 6, 2009Robert Vande HeyLightweight composite roofing tiles
US7980037 *Oct 27, 2006Jul 19, 2011Exteria Building Products, LlcDecorative wall covering with improved interlock system
US8074417Jun 17, 2011Dec 13, 2011Exteria Building Products, LlcDecorative wall covering with improved interlock system
US20060130419 *Feb 18, 2004Jun 22, 2006Modco Technology (Canada) Ltd.Roofing panel system
US20080098683 *Oct 27, 2006May 1, 2008Nailite InternationalDecorative wall covering with improved interlock system
DE1609924B1 *Feb 8, 1966Aug 26, 1971Braas & Co GmbhBetondachstein
DE3708274A1 *Mar 13, 1987Sep 22, 1988Martin PehlDachfalzziegel
DE8703827U1 *Mar 13, 1987May 21, 1987Pehl, Martin, 8904 Friedberg, DeTitle not available
DE8703828U1 *Mar 13, 1987May 21, 1987Pehl, Martin, 8904 Friedberg, DeTitle not available
DE8703829U1 *Mar 13, 1987May 21, 1987Pehl, Martin, 8904 Friedberg, DeTitle not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/533
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/265